1 to 10 of 392 blog posts

Why everything hurts in the morning, according to science

By Sarah Klein on in Health
Your muscles and joints really are stiffer and more sore when you get out of bed. Here’s why.

You know the feeling: you fall asleep feeling fine - good, even - and wake up with the sense that it’ll take a crane to get you out of bed. Everything hurts in the morning, and it’s not just because you slept in a wonky position or on a lousy pillow. Turns out, ... 

Do ice baths really fight inflammation?

By Alex Hutchinson on in Health
A new study questions the logic of post-workout cooling.

Sports science, circa 2005, was pretty confident that ice baths accelerate recovery by fighting the inflammation in muscles after a hard workout. The actual evidence that ice baths really hastened recovery was admittedly ambiguous, but the idea that cold fights inflammation seemed self-evident. By 2015, the message was less certain. Yes, ice ... 

How your breathing can help you run faster with less effort

By Lisa Buckingham on in Health
Getting oxygen to your working muscles is the most natural thing in the world, but with the right training you can boost your performance with every breath you take.

You’re standing outside waiting for a GPS lock. You haven’t taken a step, but in your brain a preparation process has already been triggered. ‘Your respiratory centre is found in an area of the brain called the hypothalamus,’ says Dr John Dickinson, Head of the Respiratory Clinic at the University ... 

What to do when a cold threatens your big race

By William O. Roberts, MD on in Health
It's unfortunate that cold-and-flu season coincides with the autumn marathon season. Here's how to cope.

I'm running my first marathon this weekend, and I've come down with a cold. Can I run with it? Is it safe to take a cold medication if it’s bothering me on race day? This is an important issue for runners, especially for those racing longer distances. And it is very ... 

Should you drink that post-run beer?

By Liz Applegate, Ph.D. on in Health
Regular exercise has a surprising effect on alcohol consumption.

Runners love their post-run beer. So much so that sometimes they’ll drink it mid-run, trying to accomplish the notorious beer mile. Mixing alcohol with exercising tends to get a bad rap. Often, runners will reduce or abstain from drinking while training for a goal race. But, is having a beer (or ...  ... 

Don't let acid reflux ruin your running

By William O. Roberts, MD on in Health
These nutritional strategies and medications can help prevent acid reflux.

I'm a marathoner who always get acid reflux during races. I need to eat and drink to keep my energy up, but doing so makes me feel so bad. Any advice? Completing a marathon is a huge physical challenge - and experiencing mid-race acid reflux will certainly make that feat even ... 

6 weird things that happen to your body while running

By Selene Yeager on in Health
Running blasts stress, strengthens your heart and gives you great legs - but it can have some strange side effects.

The benefits of aerobic exercises such as cycling or running are unmistakable. But a few of its odder side effects - like tasting blood during a race, maybe - could be mistaken for symptoms of problems. Relax: strange as these physiological reactions to exercise are, they generally aren’t cause for alarm, says sports medicine doctor Jordan Metzl, author of The Athlete’s ...  ... 

Why iron is essential for runners

By Cathy Fieseler on in Health
It’s vital for energy and good health, but many of us are low in iron. Here’s what you need to know.

Why is iron important? A trace element in the body, iron is involved in the function of the immune system, but its most critical role is in getting oxygen to your muscles. So iron is needed for the body’s metabolism and oxygen transport system to function properly – and this is ... 

A runner’s guide to hip impingement

By Michelle Kight on in Health
Get an inside look at this painful hip injury.

What is hip impingement? Hip impingement - also known as femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) - is caused when the thigh bone (femur) and the hip socket (acetabulum) produce too much friction in the hip joint.  This causes hip pain and reduced mobility in one or both hips, and can damage surrounding cartilage. ... 

Why it's time to say goodbye to BMI

By Selene Yeager on in Health
Research shows the Body Mass Index doesn’t yield the most complete information when it comes to an athlete's health.

Since the mid-nineties, health care professionals have used Body Mass Index (BMI) - a measure of how much mass someone has relative to their height - to identify whether a patient is at a healthy weight. A BMI between 18.5 and 24.99 is considered normal; 25 to 29.9 is overweight; ... 

1 to 10 of 392 blog posts

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