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5 things sports doctors are talking about right now

By William O. Roberts, MD on in Health
Our expert gives us a rundown of highlights from the American College of Sports Medicine's annual meeting.

I have compiled some highlights from the 2016 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) annual meeting, which was held recently in Boston. I hope this information improves your running and your overall health. 1/ Running is still good for you - and your heart. There has been a fair amount of press ... 

Dietitians reveal the most misguided weight loss advice they’ve heard

By Caroline Praderio for Prevention on in Health
This is the stuff they wish people would stop repeating.

When it comes to bad weight loss recommendations, dietitians have heard it all from their clients. Here are the tips they wish you’d stop believing, plus some proven strategies to use instead. “Stop eating gluten.” Unless you have coeliac disease or non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, there’s no reason to eliminate gluten from your diet, and there’s no evidence that doing ... 

Should you run further or faster to boost your aerobic energy?

By Alex Hutchinson on in Health
Maximising the 'powerhouses' of your cells can boost your performance, but how should you do it?

During aerobic exercise, most of the energy your muscle cells need is supplied by the mitochondria, a cellular component often referred to as the "powerhouse" of the cell. That’s why one of the key benefits of training is that you develop more and better-functioning mitochondria to fuel your efforts. At last ... 

Why you should improve your gut health to run better

By Sam Murphy on in Health
If you’re looking to improve your running, go deep – a tune-up for your digestive system could boost your performance and your health.

It’s the day of your big race. You’ve done the training and you’re toeing the line injury-free. Things go well for the first few miles, but then the rumblings begin. Your stomach begins to gurgle, bloat and cramp. You try hard to run through it, but there’s no escape – ... 

Hip weakness and knee pain

By Alex Hutchinson on in Health
Which is cause and which is effect?

If you've got knee pain, you might need to strengthen your hips. That's an increasingly common prescription these days, thanks to a bunch of research over the past decade or so linking conditions like runner's knee (also known as patellofemoral pain, or PFP) and more recently iliotibial band syndrome to sub-par hip ... 

Training your nervous system for a better running performance

By James Witts on in Health
A neurological master class in conditioning your nervous system for improved running performance.

Any coach or training plan will readily extol the performance-boosting benefits of improving your cardiovascular system and strengthening your musculature. But while you may already be working hard on your VO2 max and addressing your quad/hamstring imbalance, you probably haven’t given a second thought to your neurological system. Which is ... 

Is SPF 15 enough sun protection for runners?

By William O. Roberts, MD on in Health
A broad-spectrum sunscreen with a higher SPF is the best choice for preventing skin damage.

Sunscreens are very helpful for preventing sun damage and reducing the risk of skin cancers. But there are so many skin-protection products available now, it can be confusing as to what to use. First, what is SPF and what does it measure? SPF is short for “sun protection factor." It is an ... 

Running in the sun: Pros and cons

By K. Aleisha Fetters on in Health
Research reveals surprising perks of running in the sun - if you take care out there.

A runner’s relationship with the sun is complicated. You love soaking up its warmth and energy, but you hate when it leaves its mark – age spots, tan lines, painful burns – and you dread the long-term damage that may result. There are, of course, reasons to be wary, especially ... 

Which matters more, muscle or fat?

By Alex Hutchinson on in Health
A new study looks beyond BMI to assess health and heart disease risk.

Researchers at UCLA recently decided to explore a stubborn riddle. Why is that some studies suggest that being a little bit heavier than “ideal” can translate into lower risk of death from heart disease and other factors, an observation often called the “obesity paradox”? Their hypothesis was that the effect may ... 

How accurate is your activity tracker's calorie count?

By Alex Hutchinson on in Health
New study compares 12 wearable devices to “gold standard” calorie measurements.

We used to wonder how accurate the calorie count on treadmills and ellipticals was. (The answer: not very.) Now we have more sophisticated devices that track our every move, but the question is still the same: how much can we trust the numbers? Researchers at Japan’s National Institute of Health and ... 

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