General advice new to running

not new to fitness

5 messages
27/08/2013 at 12:11

Hello, i'm not new to fitness I do and have done resistance training 4 days a week for quite some time however I am new to running and have decided that during my cut it would do me good to get my Cardio outside as opposed to on a treadmill staring at myself in one of them oppressive full length mirrors they seem to like putting in front of cardio equipment.

I have also fancied having a go at one of the 'tough mudder' type events. so on Saturday I laced up my trainers and went for a run to try and assess my capability, my target was not speed just simply to reach fatigue, in 40mins I had covered 5.5km and my legs had had enough. now this is more than I had expected to complete given that i'm not built like a runner and i don't 'do' cardio exercises and i'm Asthmatic but my cardio system was happy to carry on, my legs however were done.

 

I'm not sure where to progress from here, I want to run Wednesday and Saturdays with my weight training being M,T,T,F (legs on Monday to allow some rest period.

 

I'm thinking tomorrow being my first mid week run I should aim for a 2k at a decent pace, is this the right chain of thought? or should I go for the 5k route again? my 'goal' to be able to complete 10k by the start of the new year so that I can happily enter some events next year.

27/08/2013 at 12:31

Further before faster. 

Increase your longest run by 10% each week until you can comfortably run your target distance (10k) and maybe then think about speedwork on your shorter runs. 

27/08/2013 at 12:50

OK thanks.

I'll do the same route I did at the weekend again tomorrow then and extend it a bit for next week and so on. my short term goal is just to do it i'm not particularly fussed how quickly I do it it'd just be nice when I turn up at an event not to be the one flagging at the back of the pack.

01/09/2013 at 12:17

The problem with being fit is that you can run further than is good for your legs. Running is high impact and takes getting used to. You probably wont recognise that you have run too far or too fast until that eventful moment when your legs refuse to react to something. Could be a rock on your path, a kerb, an uneven surface. That's when something will twist or complain or you'll trip. You will have felt fine until then. The lungs working and the legs ticking over.

That's why it's important to build up slowly and not over do things. You work your legs in the gym and they are strong but not used to the impact.

10k in the new year it a good starting target. Don't worry about speed work until you are comfortable with the distance. There's all sorts of speed sessions that you can do to stop you getting bored.

 

05/09/2013 at 12:54

Hello there, sorry I didn't come back on until today.

 

thank you for your advise, I completely understand what you mean about the impact - it probably doesn't help that I weigh 205lbs but im between 15-20% bf. I also tore my anterior ankle ligament November last year which still swells up and aches after a while so I need to be mindful of that but I manage it with weight training and I know my limits though running is a different challenge I know to take care of it as its a weak spot for me.

 

So far my runs have been

Week 1: Saturday 5.5K, Wednesday 5K

Week 2: Saturday 6.5K Wednesday 2.5K (was short on time)

Week 3: will be this Saturday and I have mapped out a 7K route but I may just do the 6.5K route again as I had to slow down and walk a few times last week, just couldn't get into the 'flow' and find my pace.


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