Is using a gym beneficial

20 messages
05/03/2013 at 12:29

Hi guys. I'm fairly new to running and took place in my first race on sunday. I came last, but I'm just glad I managed to finish. I find my legs feel tired before I run out of breath.

Is this something I can work on at the gym with some strength training? I don't currently have a gym membership and don't want to waste the money if it isn't going to be beneficial to getting my endurance levels up.

Anyone have any ideas?

cougie    pirate
05/03/2013 at 13:08
Well done on your first race !

Some people swear by strength exercises in the gym for their legs. I think thats a 'nice to have' rather than the most important part.

For me - the best thing to train for running is by running.

Get a decent plan and understand why you are doing each session.

Do them at the right pace and the right amount and you will improve.

Consistency is the key and avoiding injuries.

If money is an issue I'd not bother with the gym, just ask questions on here and do your own thing.
cougie    pirate
05/03/2013 at 13:18
Indeed. You need to be comfortable in running over the race distance. (unless its something stupid like a marathon as recovery takes too long to be of benefit).

Most of your runs should be done at a pace you could chat at. As you get fitter you'll be able to chat at a faster pace. I hate it when people are chatting away in races though - the gits.
05/03/2013 at 13:23
cougie wrote (see)
 I hate it when people are chatting away in races though - the gits.

I don't mind at all, unless they overtake and beat me. Only run one race but there was what I assume was a couple chatting away, I streak past (okay, pass them after a fashion), a couple of miles later while I'm struggling they saunter on by, still deep in conversation, and beat me handily.

05/03/2013 at 13:29

Ok, thanks everyone. I will continue what I'm doing. I normally run 4/5 miles every tues & thurs and the same on sundays. I really need to push myself on the sundays and try going further but slower don't I. I just find it so hard to motivate myself when I'm running by my self.

05/03/2013 at 13:33

I almost prefer running alone, especially on long runs, I find it gives me time and space to think.

It's like taking a long bath, you can just let your mind wander. It's "Me time". Once you're into a rhythm, and if you're running slow and long, running doesn't really take much additional mental effort. Your legs might complain a bit, just ignore them (unless they really hurt, then listen).

05/03/2013 at 13:36

Check out park run (google it,every saturday morning) as a park near you will have timed races over 5k,plenty take part and you may meet someone to go running with

Well done for entering your first race and completing the distance forget postions

05/03/2013 at 13:37

I found adding strength training/ gym workouts to my training week made my running easier - but you don't have to fork out for a gym membership - a few small free weights and maybe an exercise DVD to mix it up a bit

Edited: 05/03/2013 at 13:37
05/03/2013 at 13:42

Rebecca - strength training may help and certainly doing core exericises are useful.  There was a thing recently in the mag about exercises that you could do at home I think so have a hunt on this website and you'll find it.  You certainly don't need a gym membership unless you really think you'll use it lots for other things. 

Pace will come with time so don't worry too much about that just now. Definitely look into parkrun they are fantastic.

WiB
05/03/2013 at 13:46
Warkie wrote (see)

Check out park run (google it,every saturday morning) as a park near you will have timed races over 5k,plenty take part and you may meet someone to go running with

Well done for entering your first race and completing the distance forget postions

Park runs are every saturday morning... You don't actually have to Google it every Saturday morning Unless Warkie has a secret tip to share?

WiB
XX1
05/03/2013 at 14:26
WiB -- How are you defining "near"? I think the closest parkrun to me is about 30 miles away!
XX1
WiB
05/03/2013 at 14:33

I am not defining near. In fact, I never suggested a likelyhood of distance at all. My sympathies that parkrun is so far away.

WiB
WiB
05/03/2013 at 14:40

DF3 - You have been lecturing people on quotes in other threads and now you don't pay attention when I use one! Come on, you are better than this.

WiB
XX1
05/03/2013 at 14:42
WiB -- Ah yes, apologies, my question should have been aimed at Warkie.
XX1
05/03/2013 at 14:43

I've had a look and no parkruns near me. Unless I went and made a day of it, which I guess I could do every once in a while.

I guess I will just keep pushing on with what I am doing and hope to see an improvement. I think I'm just getting impatient. I managed to get up to 4 miles pretty quickly but now I don't seem to be making any progress

WiB
05/03/2013 at 14:43

No worries TD.

Edited: 05/03/2013 at 14:47
WiB
06/03/2013 at 06:57
Taxi Driver wrote (see)
WiB -- How are you defining "near"? I think the closest parkrun to me is about 30 miles away!

 

Taxi Driver wrote (see)
WiB -- Ah yes, apologies, my question should have been aimed at Warkie.

Whoops.. not everyone have a park run near them  then ....

XX1
06/03/2013 at 09:03
RC3 -- There are various magazines -- Runner's World, Women's Running, Running Fitness, etc -- that every now and again do articles on exercises that can easily be done at home... It might be worth checking them out for a couple of months before rushing to the gym. Is there any particular distance that you are looking to race at? Also, are all your training runs done at the same pace?
XX1
06/03/2013 at 10:39

In terms of specfically trying to improve strength in your legs - running up hills with do this.  You don't need to do killer hill sessions though (at first anyway) - just make sure there are a few on your normal route.

 

You also cannot beat squats and lunges for leg strength and push ups for your core and arms - you don't need a gym for any of those.

06/03/2013 at 11:32

Taxi Driver: I have a 10k coming up at the end of March. So far I have done 5.5 miles but it's a flat course so I have no doubt I can't push myself up to 6. I also have a half marathon in Oct & would potentially like to run a marathon next spring. Is this realistic? I have been doing sporadic kettle bell workouts, but I think I will knuckle down & get myself a good programme to follow with them and just concentrated on my running.

GymAddict: Ok thanks, I will add some hill training into my running. I have been using kettle bells occasionaly but I guess I should find a proper workout using these focusing on my legs & core and start incorporating this into my weekly schedule. Do you have anything you could reccomend?

Thanks


We'd love you to add a comment! Please login or take half a minute to register as a free member
20 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW competitions

RW Forums