Answer this and then I'll tell you why I've asked it.

1 to 20 of 33 messages
27/01/2013 at 16:33

7 3 4 6

27/01/2013 at 16:47

Bit of a random puzzle?

27/01/2013 at 16:52

7 3 4 6

27/01/2013 at 16:58

A + B + C + D = 20

A = B+4

B = C-1 is the same as C= B+1

D = B+B

Replace A, C and D in the first giving

B+4 + B + B+1 + B + B is the same as 5B + 5 = 20 is the same as 5B=15 is the same as B=3

So A = B+ 4 = 7,B = 3, C=B+1=4,D = 2xB=6

Simples

27/01/2013 at 16:59

If the numbers were higher they wouldn't add up to 20!

27/01/2013 at 17:10

Are you going to pay us to supply you with the 11+ answers as well? 

27/01/2013 at 17:32

who mentioned beer!!
As Old Colin set out - that was how I calculated it as well.

Not sure if an 8 year old is supposed to work it out that way though!!
I was nearly stumped by some questions my 6 year old g'daughter had recently  - it's all different to when I were a lad 

27/01/2013 at 17:46
B+(B+4)+(B+1)+2B=20
5B+5=20
B=3
therefore B+4=7, B=3, B+1=4,2 x B=6.
27/01/2013 at 18:03

I got it right but didn't bother to dredge up my algebra skills (which I'm fairly sure I didn't have when I was 8!). Try this instead:

Pile 1 has 4 more coins than pile 2, so it has to have at least 4 coins in it. That would make it 4+0+1... oops, can't have 2x0, so that's not the answer and doesn't use all the coins anyway.

Try again with 5 coins in pile 1. 5+1+2+2 works okay except they don't add up to 20.

(By this point she'll probably be happy enough to skip stage 3..., but obvs it's 6+2+3+4=15)

Then try it with 7 coins in pile 1 and it works AND adds up to 20, so you can stop.

27/01/2013 at 18:04

And to think I nearly did A-level further maths. It'd probably take me all day to do one question using the 'try everything till it works' method!

27/01/2013 at 18:58
Try everything is the approach my garage uses when they try to fix my car.
27/01/2013 at 19:14
literatin wrote (see)

And to think I nearly did A-level further maths. It'd probably take me all day to do one question using the 'try everything till it works' method!

I did do further maths (for the life of me I have no idea why now) and most of the things they taught you are pretty much try it until it works 

For 20 try it until it works is as good, I started at A=6 as B was 4 less and aimimg at 20.

The daily mail mindbender 1st question is always good practice for those sort of questions, rubbish for news great for puzzles.

27/01/2013 at 19:59

I did (started) normal A-level maths, in a pointless attempt to be different from my sister (who did English literature). At the same time as the maths class, all my friends had English and were clearly having way more fun. The job I have now mainly involves literary criticism and no maths at all. Grr.

Having said that, though, this is kind of fun. Kittenkat, does your daughter have any more homework?

27/01/2013 at 20:23

I can honestly say that I've never had to use Pythagorus' thereom.

27/01/2013 at 21:22
Never built a barbeque?
28/01/2013 at 08:30

I have always thought that there should be a certficate for basic numeracy, which teaches you all the stuff you need in life including weights and measures and monetary stuff like budgets and APR's etc. and then a separate, optional, subject for the rest of maths for people that are into that sort of thing.

If I'd known, when I was 8 and crying because I couldn't understand long division that I would never need to use it and, similarly, being bored to tears by algebra at 15, I would have been devastated  

I am actually quite bitter that I was forced to spend all that tme learning that stuff when I could have been doing something more useful and interesting. 

Same goes for English too - grammar, spelling how to write letters, how to write a CV etc. - leave the essays on Shakespeare for the enthusiasts.

 

 

Cheerful Dave    pirate
28/01/2013 at 09:33
Screamapillar wrote (see)

Same goes for English too - grammar, spelling how to write letters, how to write a CV etc. - leave the essays on Shakespeare for the enthusiasts.

When I were a lad we had separate O Levels for English Language (which was compulsory and covered grammar, spelling, how to write letters etc) and English Literature (optional, essays on Shakespeare for the enthusiasts).  Is it different these days?

Cheerful Dave    pirate
28/01/2013 at 09:47
kittenkat wrote (see)

Ok, so 2 people have got the same answer, so I'm assuming it's right... But here's the next question, do any higher numbers solve the puzzle?

You can make the 'numbers in each pile' logic work for any total number of coins that's a multiple of 5.  Although it's a bit dubious when the total is 5 because the number in each is 4 0 1 0.

Edited: 28/01/2013 at 09:47
Nurse Ratched    pirate
28/01/2013 at 09:49

My head hurts

K80
28/01/2013 at 10:59
Cheerful Dave wrote (see)
Screamapillar wrote (see)

Same goes for English too - grammar, spelling how to write letters, how to write a CV etc. - leave the essays on Shakespeare for the enthusiasts.

When I were a lad we had separate O Levels for English Language (which was compulsory and covered grammar, spelling, how to write letters etc) and English Literature (optional, essays on Shakespeare for the enthusiasts).  Is it different these days?

I asked my daughter's English teacher why she received an A for one of her essays that was littered with grammatical errors. Her teacher said they weren't marking on grammar or spelling - it was for creativity

 

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