Any vets around?

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26/04/2013 at 20:31
CheesyRider - Born to be Mild wrote (see)

Just be aware that as I found out the hard way, taking on insurance after you have already had treatment for 'something' could make future claims invalid. I am sure you can work that out, but .... was the trapped nerve ANYWHERE near where he is stiff?

If it is, insurance could well be a waste of money.

 

Take it to a different vet who doesn't know what previous treatment it's had ?   

kittenkat    pirate
27/04/2013 at 07:20

Thanks everyone for the kind replies, and yes it is in his back end where the trapped nerve was.

 

27/04/2013 at 11:52
popsider wrote (see)
Screamapillar wrote (see)

I have always had pet insurance. I can't understand why anyone wouldn't TBH.

 

Because it's expensive.  

Too right - when the cat began to cost more than the car to insure I went for a cheaper version.  Very annoying you don't get no claims bonus with a cat, he's never been ill in his life but they know we are all suckers... the insurance companies that is, OBVIOUSLY cats know we are suckers that's why they domesticated us in the first place.

KK hope your dog is better soon, maybe he needs sports massage?

27/04/2013 at 11:58

What breed /size is your dog ...........have you looked into hip dysplasia?

27/04/2013 at 12:41

 

popsider wrote (see)
Screamapillar wrote (see)

I have always had pet insurance. I can't understand why anyone wouldn't TBH.

 

Because it's expensive.  

But not as expensive as when your pet gets a serious injury or chronic condition, that's the whole point.

If KK's dog does have an arthritic condition, long term management of it could cost a fortune.

Still, I suppose that sort of thinking is why some people don't bother with home or travel insurance either....

Edited: 27/04/2013 at 12:52
kittenkat    pirate
27/04/2013 at 12:52
Screamapillar wrote (see)

 

popsider wrote (see)
Screamapillar wrote (see)

I have always had pet insurance. I can't understand why anyone wouldn't TBH.

 

Because it's expensive.  

But not as expensive as when your pet gets a serious injury or chronic condition, that's the whole point.

Still, I suppose that sort of thinking is why some people don't bother with home or travel insurance either....

The insurance companies make shed loads of profit, so aren't the odds in your favour if you don't? I remember my cat had an expensive operation (the one that removed his dick for those of you that remember). That cost nearly £800 but how much would we have paid out over his 11 years if we'd had him insured. I think you pay the money either way.

But yeah, you're right it's an expensive gamble possibly depending on severitude of problem and length of treatment.

 

 

kittenkat    pirate
27/04/2013 at 12:57
roeby wrote (see)

What breed /size is your dog ...........have you looked into hip dysplasia?

As far as we know he is a Border Collie. He was rescued at 3 months old from a farm in Ireland, the whole litter was neglected and the farmer was going to drown them. he charged the charity to take them away. Cole was covered in mange with virtually no fur on his face. He was so nervous that the manager of the Blue Cross in Tiverton took him into his own home. He was ours 2 weeks after that.

So we have no real knowledge of his history. I have been told by every vet that he's a very well put together healthy dog. He does tend to be a bit neurotic, and he does get scared easily. Mr overthinker.

He will be 3 in September.

27/04/2013 at 12:57

"It's an expensive gamble"

Spot on.

But I'd rather pay a manageable monthly or annual bill I'm expecting than a massive one I'm not.  The worst case scenario is that you have to choose between giving the animal treatment and having it put to sleep because you can't afford it - I'd never want to be in that position

 

kittenkat    pirate
27/04/2013 at 13:07
Screamapillar wrote (see)

"It's an expensive gamble"

Spot on.

But I'd rather pay a manageable monthly or annual bill I'm expecting than a massive one I'm not.  The worst case scenario is that you have to choose between giving the animal treatment and having it put to sleep because you can't afford it - I'd never want to be in that position

 

That position wouldn't happen to us as I know we would be lent the money by someone close who could afford it.

I will look at pet insurance but I've had bad experiences when I have had it. We'll see, generally I would be more inclined to insure an older animal (before they get so old that there's a massive price hike)

K80
30/04/2013 at 15:12

How's Cole KK?

We used to rescue / foster Great Danes. The first one crippled us financially with vet bills so we got the others insured the minute we picked them up.

Petplan were fabulous but pricey. Nowadays we have a lurcher and Argos pet insurance. We haven't needed their services but i've heard good things.

30/04/2013 at 17:35

I took him out for a walk before work and he seems fine. I guess we're just keeping an eye on him, I did a gentle 5 mile run on Sunday with him. I think that running is fine, it's the jumping, twisting and turning which is not so.

So he's banned from his ball and flinger!

30/04/2013 at 21:01

Hi there,

If the dog exercising fine and having no trouble with general mobility then it's likely to be more a soft tissue problem - perhaps a pulled muscle, strain or sprain.  Rest and painkillers (NOT human ones) often sort it out.  It could be suggestive of a spinal problem as well though, so that would need to be investigated if conservative management didn't work.

Arthritic dogs are usually a bit slow and stiff on getting up then warm out of it with exercise so things get better with activity.  Collies aren't that prone to HD but it's not impossible.

I would definitely recommend insurance.  I work at a vets and all staff pets are insured.  We can do so much more for animals nowadays but the technology and expertise doesn't come cheap and it's nice to have all options available for treatment and not just be limited by finances.  For those suggesting go to another vet, that doesn't work because you need to declare it to the insurance company and a good vet will always get previous vet details to ensure there are no issues to be aware of with the pet's health.

It is a gamble but it's also peace of mind.  I knew a lady who took out insurance for her older cat.  He developed a thyroid condition and needed radioactive iodine treatment which involved 3 weeks hospitalisation (because the cat is radioactive!) and a lot of blood testing. The total cost of treatment was about £2000.  Two days after being released from hospital, the cat broke its leg and was promptly sent back.  It was a complicated fracture and cost a further £2500.  I would say that the £12/month on insurance was well spent! 

Hope your wee dog is back to full speed soon!!

 

kittenkat    pirate
30/04/2013 at 21:10
Tommygun2 wrote (see)
kaffeeg wrote (see)

Ohhhhhh, forgive me, I'm over the age of 12 and use actual words. 

Or you could be said to be "out of touch"

I sense some angry sarcasm in your post Keffeeg.

 

Rubbishrunner wrote (see)

Hi there,

If the dog exercising fine and having no trouble with general mobility then it's likely to be more a soft tissue problem - perhaps a pulled muscle, strain or sprain.  Rest and painkillers (NOT human ones) often sort it out.  It could be suggestive of a spinal problem as well though, so that would need to be investigated if conservative management didn't work.

Arthritic dogs are usually a bit slow and stiff on getting up then warm out of it with exercise so things get better with activity.  Collies aren't that prone to HD but it's not impossible.

I would definitely recommend insurance.  I work at a vets and all staff pets are insured.  We can do so much more for animals nowadays but the technology and expertise doesn't come cheap and it's nice to have all options available for treatment and not just be limited by finances.  For those suggesting go to another vet, that doesn't work because you need to declare it to the insurance company and a good vet will always get previous vet details to ensure there are no issues to be aware of with the pet's health.

It is a gamble but it's also peace of mind.  I knew a lady who took out insurance for her older cat.  He developed a thyroid condition and needed radioactive iodine treatment which involved 3 weeks hospitalisation (because the cat is radioactive!) and a lot of blood testing. The total cost of treatment was about £2000.  Two days after being released from hospital, the cat broke its leg and was promptly sent back.  It was a complicated fracture and cost a further £2500.  I would say that the £12/month on insurance was well spent! 

Hope your wee dog is back to full speed soon!!

 

Thanks for the reply, yes since this thread I've found myself considering insurance! It's also interesting that despite being very experienced dog owners, we've had to 'read' dogs all over again as this is our first Border Collie. We have always had German Shepherds, and collies are so different!

kittenkat    pirate
30/04/2013 at 21:10

Ha, that other quote came from another thread.

30/04/2013 at 21:17

My insurance is up for renewal around 340 for a 6 year old Labrador, does that sound about the going rate?

kittenkat    pirate
30/04/2013 at 21:19
booktrunk wrote (see)

My insurance is up for renewal around 340 for a 6 year old Labrador, does that sound about the going rate?

Just give him/her a facelift and tummy tuck. Could pass as 2 easily

30/04/2013 at 21:24
booktrunk wrote (see)

My insurance is up for renewal around 340 for a 6 year old Labrador, does that sound about the going rate?

I pay about £220 for a 4 year old labrador cross if that helps. I shop around every year when the renewal comes through.

30/04/2013 at 21:49

I pay about £42/month for a 6yo medium size dog.  It's lifetime cover with £6000 of vets fees per year, with no time limit on any conditions. 

Saffy - shopping around is only any good if your dog has never been unwell as, even if you never claimed, a condition is pre-existing if your dog has seen a vet for it. Furthermore, you're usually not covered for anything that arises in the first 2-4 weeks of a new policy - can't tell you how often this comes up in practice.   Also, all companies and policies are not created equal!!

Internet only policies are ones to be very wary of - they often have a lot of terms and conditions attached and it's these types of policies that cause frustration with pet owners.  Also, cheaper policies tend to have 12 month cover only so fine for an acute problem but not so good for arthritis or recurring skin disease or diabetes or anything that lasts longer than 12 months!!  Some policies will pay a certain amount per condition with no time limit - a "maximum benefit" policy.  These can be good but only if the benefit is high - minimum £6000.

As a general rule, the companies that have been around the longest are the most reliable.  I would be wary of a company that purports to be  "friends of animals" (they're quite high in comparison sites) and another that has an associate with horses in the title. 

Some companies have cheap headline prices then you find you're paying a £150 excess and 35% of all vets fees anyway so perhaps a false economy if money is a bit tight.

I've seen so many wonderful recoveries of pets that just wouldn't have been possible for people to afford without insurance.  There is no NHS for pets so if you think that a large unexpected bill might be a struggle financially then insurance is definitely worth considering.

Have a look at www.insureyourpet.co.uk for nonbiased information - it's written by a vet and it's not selling anything so you can get a good idea of the different types of policy.

Sorry for the long winded answer - this is an area that catches so many people out and it's horrible for pets and owners when that happens.  The FSA deemed it illegal for veterinary staff to advise on specific policies so, even though we know which ones are good and bad, we're not allowed to pass this on!

My own dog is insured with Petplan.  This is not advice, merely a statement of fact

30/04/2013 at 21:52

KK: Collies and GSDs - yes, completely different but at least both intelligent dogs Both should be good for running, I would think.  Collies are usually a bit healthier than GSDs overall.

Staffies are popular where I work - lovely dogs but not much between the ears except a big thick skull ;)

Edited: 30/04/2013 at 21:52
30/04/2013 at 21:56

Good post, thanks Rubbishrunner 

Yeah, good point about the previous illnesses.  I forgot about that!  I am very careful about comparing policies, i don't just go for the cheapest, but i will check out the link you've included above.

Cheers!

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