Design faults in everyday objects.

41 to 58 of 58 messages
Blisters    pirate
25/02/2013 at 23:22

If I want to turn my computer off, I have to press the tab labelled "Start".

Have you ever tried drinking from one of those classic triangular martini cocktail glasses? Try moving without the entire contents jumping straight out.

Ladder style heater towel rails? It takes the patience of a Saint to thread a towel onto them.

Modern draught proof letter boxes? They are impenetrable to letters, yet still allow freezing cold draughts to permeate.

The buttons on a Blackberry phone. You need two hands to operate it to get the upper functions, and most human fingers cover an area of 9 buttons anyway.

25/02/2013 at 23:51

My legs.  Don't move quickly enough and refuse to take hints from training or instruction.

 

kittenkat    pirate
26/02/2013 at 05:56

You're doing fine 40!

26/02/2013 at 07:54

those metal tea pots at service stations/little chef etc, its impossible to pour them without it going everywhere,

26/02/2013 at 08:48

+1 with 40mins (how ya doing fella?? long time no see)

someone on the radio this morning said "you have to listen to your body" - mine keeps telling me to feck off....

27/02/2013 at 11:53
27/02/2013 at 12:30

KK - Me being slower than you may fit your definition of fine...

FB - Doing fine thanks.  I keep getting links to your recruitment of interesting-sounding people on linkedin.  Only problem at the moment is keeping up with that kitten!

 

27/02/2013 at 13:28

most of the doors in my office are fitted with alarms that emit a high pitched tone if they're open for more than about 10-15 seconds. This is to prevent doors being left open and unauthorised people walking where they're not permitted. They're all slightly weighted so they close by themselves, but the one nearest my desk also has a catch that allows it to stick in the open position, which means about half the people who go through it open it the full way, hitting the catch, followed by a high pitched squeek about 10 seconds later. This, all day long, about every 10 minutes.

27/02/2013 at 13:33

My Garmin 205... where it is just too easy to accidentally stop the watch or start a new lap when adjusting my sleeve.

27/02/2013 at 13:43

Speaking of watches...

Why do most watches (men's analogue ones anyway) seem to come with a bunch of tiny dials set into the watch face? Seems like you'd struggle to read them, even if you knew what they were for.

28/02/2013 at 12:00
goldbeetle wrote (see)

Im impressed musketeer has cup and saucers

Of course we have got saucers - what else would we drink from?


 

28/02/2013 at 20:29
Tom77 wrote (see)

Speaking of watches...

Why do most watches (men's analogue ones anyway) seem to come with a bunch of tiny dials set into the watch face? Seems like you'd struggle to read them, even if you knew what they were for.

i'm not a fan of chronograph either (used to be), but you dont actually need to read them on the fly, its a stop watch of sorts, my breitling has chrono but i'm selling it to buy a nicer clean faced omega, 

03/03/2013 at 16:23

Car wheel nuts, on one side of your car the momentum tightens them on the other it can potentially loosen them

kittenkat    pirate
03/03/2013 at 16:29
40 minutes wrote (see)

KK - Me being slower than you may fit your definition of fine...

FB - Doing fine thanks.  I keep getting links to your recruitment of interesting-sounding people on linkedin.  Only problem at the moment is keeping up with that kitten!

 

How was the half today? I did 13.5 with Cole, it should have been longer but I've had a head cold and couldn't be arsed. Hopefully I can get to the long run on Sat, but I haven't looked to see what D's shifts are yet. I also know we still owe you a can of paint. I will get onto it...

03/03/2013 at 16:39

The Caps Lock key on this keyboard is in the wrong place and I keep hitting it when I want Shift instead.

19/10/2013 at 14:16

I have a Timex Ironman Sleek150-lap Tapscreen watch. Cost £100 three years ago. The one year warranty is specific about what is and is not included. The strap is not included but if a new one is required Timex may charge the customer.

Two weeks ago I noticed that the plastic wrist strap was partially torn from the edge to one of the holes for the buckle. The jeweller sent it to Timex who said it could not be repaired but Timex would sell me a new one for £20 off the current price for same model. I said no thanks.

Apparently the reason that it cannot be repaired is that it is a strap moulded around the watch face. To my mind that contradicts the warranty specific to the watch which states a new strap would be at the customer's expense. However many "sports watches" nowadays have moulded straps, surely the watch does not become obsolete for want of a new strap?

It does cross my mind that a new strap and labour may cost as much as a new watch. If so, that in itself would be a poor design for any watch or suggest that the watch is cheap.

I may try melting the plastic to repair the tear and let it go once the battery runs out.

21/10/2013 at 18:59

Cashpoints. They're always busy thanking the previous customer. It's a bit of a waste of time, as the previous customer has already gone. It just means that the next person has to waste time waiting to put their card in the slot.

21/10/2013 at 20:16

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