dodgy brazilian

1 to 20 of 31 messages
21/08/2013 at 10:25

Do you really care if a dodgy Brazillian who was clearly being used to transport classified information which could impact on national security to his boyfriend who happens to be a journalist of a national paper is stopped and detained. 

I would expect nothing less of the police/intelligence agencies and they should be given a pat on the back. 

As for the journalist/his boyfriend/ and the national paper they knew what they were doing and got caught. Get over it and grow a pair !

21/08/2013 at 10:39

He may or not have been carrying stolen data but either way the police had to act if they had infomation suggesting he did. They'd have been in deep doo doos if they hadn't stopped him.

21/08/2013 at 10:44

"Dodgy Brazilian", I thought you meant something else...

21/08/2013 at 10:53

Step away from the razor!

21/08/2013 at 11:08
Runnin man wrote (see)

Step away from the razor!

 Wax is far better 

21/08/2013 at 11:22

Hair is far better

21/08/2013 at 11:32

Only on your head.

21/08/2013 at 11:38

What's dodgy about him?  No one's dodgy because they may or may not be carrying encrypted data.  It was merely the US & UK flexing their muscles because Greenwald is a thorn in their sides.

21/08/2013 at 11:58
Slowfoot Going Goofy wrote (see)

Do you really care if a dodgy Brazillian who was clearly being used to transport classified information which could impact on national security to his boyfriend who happens to be a journalist of a national paper is stopped and detained. 

I would expect nothing less of the police/intelligence agencies and they should be given a pat on the back. 

As for the journalist/his boyfriend/ and the national paper they knew what they were doing and got caught. Get over it and grow a pair !

What's dodgy is that it was clear harassment because they're pissed off. Plus the fact that they're avoiding national laws by detaining him in the 'outside the law' area of the customs area at an airport. It's actually very worrying and completely disgusting, not least because we are simply acting as a puppet to our American masters.

21/08/2013 at 12:06

The more I think about it the more I'm inclined to move to a secure messaging platform, or start looking in to using something like PGP.  Then again, I can't be arsed.

21/08/2013 at 12:51

Here's an eloquent piece on why it matters

http://www.theguardian.com/world/defence-and-security-blog/2013/aug/20/david-miranda-detention-journalists-sensitive-information

21/08/2013 at 12:52

Detaining people unethically (but lawfully) is no more dodgy than what they are doing, which is effectively transporting and releasing damaging information, both actions are wrong but both are within the legal frameworks, you can't cry ethics when what you've originally done is just as devoid of ethics.

I would be more critical of our intelligence and police if they stood by taking this. 

21/08/2013 at 13:01

Runnin man - what damaging information was he transporting, and what damaging information has he released?

21/08/2013 at 13:02

Investigative journalism that uncovers law-breaking by governments (which is what the Snowden thing is all about) is not unethical. And one of the points about this is that it's a pre-emptive strike against all journalists who dabble in this area, saying 'we shall hassle you and your family'. Disgusting.

Edited: 21/08/2013 at 13:04
21/08/2013 at 13:21

He was interviewed in the belief that he had highly sensitive or stolen information. He stayed with a known film maker who was working on this issue, and is the boyfrind of the guardian reporter, he admitted carrying journalistic materials, and so there was more than reasonable suspicion that would allow him to have been arrested under the Official Secrets Act or some other legislation.

Fair play to the security servcies

21/08/2013 at 13:32
Runnin man wrote (see)

He was interviewed in the belief that he had highly sensitive or stolen information. He stayed with a known film maker who was working on this issue, and is the boyfrind of the guardian reporter, he admitted carrying journalistic materials, and so there was more than reasonable suspicion that would allow him to have been arrested under the Official Secrets Act or some other legislation.

Fair play to the security servcies


except that if you do hold someone for any time you should be very sure what legislation you do it under. You cant just hold someone and then pick and choose your grounds after. It was anti-terror legislation they used.

21/08/2013 at 14:18
David Miranda's detention had no basis in law, says former lord chancellor

 

So, yes, it does bother me that the police use anti-terror legislation to detain people who are clearly not terrorists. If they thought he'd broken the law (Official Secrets Act or anything else) then they should have arrested him.

21/08/2013 at 15:19

A lot of the stuff being published by the Guardian is about surveillance of communications. If blowing the whistle on how it is done could help terrorists evade surveillance, then anti-terrorism legislation is appropriate here, yes?

In any case, given the company he keeps and the stuff he was carrying, he was pretty dumb to fly via the UK.

21/08/2013 at 15:54
Runnin man wrote (see)

He was interviewed in the belief that he had highly sensitive or stolen information. He stayed with a known film maker who was working on this issue, and is the boyfrind of the guardian reporter, he admitted carrying journalistic materials, and so there was more than reasonable suspicion that would allow him to have been arrested under the Official Secrets Act or some other legislation.

Fair play to the security servcies

No he wasn't. If he had that stuff on him, it would have taken them much less time to find it. It was a clear misuse of anti-terrorism legislation, a warning shot to the media and harassment of someone involved with the journalist who is working on the story. We should all be very clear how dangerous this move is.

21/08/2013 at 15:56
Tom77 wrote (see)
David Miranda's detention had no basis in law, says former lord chancellor

 

So, yes, it does bother me that the police use anti-terror legislation to detain people who are clearly not terrorists. If they thought he'd broken the law (Official Secrets Act or anything else) then they should have arrested him.

Quite.

1 to 20 of 31 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW Forums