Grammar pedants?

Is "I was sat" correct?

81 to 100 of 127 messages
03/07/2013 at 15:22

I don't believe that this generation are any worse than any previous generation. Bad grammar and spelling has been popular among the less academic for all time.

The difference is that this generation of the less well educated have to fill out forms and submit CVs to get their shit jobs, rather than turn up at the factory gates, and the evidence of their grammar is more prevalent.

seren nos yn canu    pirate
03/07/2013 at 15:41

true Nicky.........

a CV doesn't tell you a lot aboput someone now...........those with bad skills will just pay someone else to do it for them if they have the money.....and it will get cheaper and cheaper to get one done and before long we will have 100's of identical generic CV's .all with perfect punctuation and grammar that will tell you nothing about the person who is applying......or their skills...........

 

03/07/2013 at 15:51
seren nos wrote (see)

true Nicky.........

a CV doesn't tell you a lot aboput someone now...........those with bad skills will just pay someone else to do it for them if they have the money.....and it will get cheaper and cheaper to get one done and before long we will have 100's of identical generic CV's .all with perfect punctuation and grammar that will tell you nothing about the person who is applying......or their skills...........

 

You seem to be forgetting that the content will be different. Exam grades, experience, interests etc. It's possible to weed out the bullsh*t if you read them carefully enough. 

I read one once where a bloke who made a living putting up posters on the underground felt he would be an ideal candidate for a job as a copywriter. There was nothing wrong with the CV, there was also nothing whatsoever in it that could back this claim up.

And if all else fails an aptitude test can can sort out the men from the boys.

03/07/2013 at 15:52
Screamapillar wrote (see)
And if all else fails an aptitude test can can sort out the men from the boys.


You're not allowed to be ageist or sexist in recruitment  you know.

03/07/2013 at 15:58
Nicky McNamerson wrote (see)
Screamapillar wrote (see)
And if all else fails an aptitude test can can sort out the men from the boys.


You're not allowed to be ageist or sexist in recruitment  you know.

And the women from the girls 

 

Actually, with forms, it is fill out or fill in? That's one I've alway wondered about...

03/07/2013 at 16:19

I think maybe the British fill a form IN, and the Americans fill it OUT.

03/07/2013 at 16:23

Why the overuse of apostrophes everywhere?

It's not GCSE's or CV's or even PB's.

Teachers get this wrong so often that I'm sure the extra apostrophes are here to stay.

03/07/2013 at 16:29
Wilkie wrote (see)

I think maybe the British fill a form IN, and the Americans fill it OUT.

Could be. In makes more sense to me as it suggests the addition of something. After all, you fill a gap in, you don't fill it out.

03/07/2013 at 16:31

I can't believe I missed this whole thread. Must have been actually working or something. Anyway, I would say that the reason it would be difficult to teach spelling, punctuation and grammar adequately in schools is that many teachers will be my age (30s) or younger, and we weren't taught it when we were at school either. Many university students who graduate with a 2:1 aren't that good at it, and they will be the ones who go on to do PGCEs and become teachers. They have plenty of other excellent and relevant skills, but not necessarily that one.

Split infinitives are fine, though.

03/07/2013 at 16:34

Using the word "fill" for a form at all doesn't feel right. I would prefer "complete", "filling" things sounds like there should be something more tangible than information in there.

03/07/2013 at 16:48

I have a feeling there are some gramma in jokes going on here about split infinitives and ending sentences with prepositions, etc, though I dont know what.

03/07/2013 at 22:30

Without the equivalent of the Acade'mie Francaise or Cymdeithas yr Iaith Gymraeg, I'm afraid English is at the mercy of custom and practice, innit.

Edited: 03/07/2013 at 22:32
04/07/2013 at 09:22

I always used to ask for an expresso at a coffee bar until someone told me I was using the wrong word. I'm happy to be corrected by people. Life is a learning process.

04/07/2013 at 13:01

"So although I do not see spelling or grammar as an absolute measure of intelligence, nor do i think that poor spelling is a sign of a lack of intelligence, I do wonder how some of these Degrees were earned."

I don't think it's necessarily about levels of intelligence - I think it has more to do with laziness and trying to be cool.

And for the "should of" debate - it is incorrect and lazy.  If I were an employer I would not consider a candidate who could not be bothered to write 'should have' - or worse, did not even know that this was wrong.  Perhaps I'm being pedantic, but ultimately it's about standards - personal presentation isn't just about what you wear.

Pudge    pirate
04/07/2013 at 13:03

Correct, it's about HOW you wear it Beth.

Not many people can pull off a chino/brogue/tank top combo.

04/07/2013 at 13:06

Picture please.....!

04/07/2013 at 13:12

That's true Beth, I think it is laziness more than anything.

As SR pointed out earlier, if you genuinely believe it's "pacific" and someone points out it's "specific" how hard has that been to learn? How much will it cost you to remember it? All that's happened is that you've been saved from looking a prawn in front of someone else.

Lose/loose is my pet peeve. It's so illogical. If you think "lose" is spelled "loose" then how do you think "loose" is spelled?  "Looose"? 

04/07/2013 at 13:16

'loosse', I should think, as the vowel sound is similar but the s is different. Though actually it's pretty logical to spell 'lose' as 'loose', since the oo sound is actually longer in 'lose'.

Pudge    pirate
04/07/2013 at 13:19

Screamapillar wrote (see)

 

Lose/loose is my pet peeve. It's so illogical. If you think "lose" is spelled "loose" then how do you think "loose" is spelled?  "Looose"? 


No - duh.

It's Lousse.

Which it obviously is, because that's how Mousse is spelled (save for the 'M').

The English language is fucked up in so may ways, it is small wonder that mistakes are made.  That goes for everybody, Wilkie included.

04/07/2013 at 13:23

Mousse is French though Pudge 

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