Inappropriate language

Grrr

1 to 20 of 55 messages
Blisters    pirate
01/10/2012 at 12:42

I was cooking for some friends of my younger daughter. One said, "Hey, this pizza's really lush!"

Oh I'm terribly sorry, I'll take it away then.
My garden is lush. With all this rain the lawn is really overgrown.

Obviously I am aware that language does change, but not on my watch. It isn't like I was going to ask them if they had a gay time at the children's party.

01/10/2012 at 12:51

I think someone needs to take some chillout pills

seren nos yn canu    pirate
01/10/2012 at 12:53

sound like an old man blisters..........unless you walk around talking in shakespherean language then you have no reason to moan at the evolution of the language.....you are just as guilty

cougie    pirate
01/10/2012 at 13:02
Pizza ?? You allow modern food into the house ???
01/10/2012 at 13:11

When I read the title of the thread, this is not the content I expected!

"Lush" is a great word. Maybe Gavin & Stacey  (a popular BBC situation-comedy television series, broadcast in the noughties* ) helped popularise it.

 

* Is "noughties" allowed?

01/10/2012 at 14:31

Perhaps it was used as an abbreviation of LUSCIOUS?

01/10/2012 at 14:51

Or luxurious?

01/10/2012 at 15:20

Lush has been used in that context for years in Bristol and the South West.  Since long before Gavin and Stacey.

Gert Lush makes it even better.

 

01/10/2012 at 15:28

Mouse I concur

Gert Lush that's very common

 I come from Surrey where we speak proper though ;-)

Another one from down here. Instead of saying 'Where is it' They say 'Wheres it to?' That really grates on me lol I always find the need to correct them

01/10/2012 at 15:34
Now for me Lush is a person usually an older woman who has a bit of a drink problem!
Edited: 01/10/2012 at 15:35
bburn plO.dder    pirate
01/10/2012 at 15:35
M..o.use wrote (see)

Lush has been used in that context for years in Bristol and the South West.  Since long before Gavin and Stacey.

Gert Lush makes it even better.

 

Mr plodder is from Bristol and has been calling my cooking "Gert Lush" for years

01/10/2012 at 15:41

I'm sure we said this at school waaay back in the seventies. 

What is beginning to annoy me... and I am afraid I am also guilty of it, is that terrible inflection at the end of sentences? Makes everything you say sound like a question even when it's not? Or maybe makes you sound a bit Australian? 

 

01/10/2012 at 15:44

The rising inflection really annoys me. It's completely unnecessary? And very irritating? Why are all Australians so quizzical?

Something I've noticed since moving up north is people saying, for example, '12 while 3' meaning from 12pm until 3pm. While? I don't understand!

01/10/2012 at 16:00

The AQI (Australian Quesioning Intonation) has been a linguistic marker used to track language development for the last 20 odd years (I know, cos I wrote an essay on it once )
The other linguistic oddity that was mapped in the same way was the "non-prevocalic r" - the over pronunciation of an r in words (a bit like what we might think of as the English South West burr) that was perceived to be more prevalent in the upper-middle classes in 1950s America, so it was forcibly adopted into aspirant working class accents.

There is also a feminist paper that argues that the AQI has increased in frequency as women have become more powerful and successful as it is a "femine" softening of a statement - make it seem like you are asking a question/seem unsure, when in fact you are giving a straight instruction, for example. Don't know how much I subscribe to that idea.

LIVERBIRD    pirate
01/10/2012 at 16:03

Through.

They say 12 through 3 here.

I am NOT American.

I checked

01/10/2012 at 17:20

Australians probably developed that 'questioning intonation' as a result of so many of them having ascended from the criminal classes. Having been apprehended by the law; again, the response was in answer to a typical leading question, eg." Afternoon Bruce, why do you think I arrested you this time?", "er, because you think I stole these sheep?". 

01/10/2012 at 17:33

To me Lush is a shop selling fancy and very heavily fragranced cosmetics. Spend five minutes in the place and you come out smelling like a whore's handbag.

Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
01/10/2012 at 17:37

Americans have that inflection too.

I hate it when you ask someone how they are and they reply "I'm good"

01/10/2012 at 17:39
RicF wrote (see)

Australians probably developed that 'questioning intonation' as a result of so many of them having ascended from the criminal classes. Having been apprehended by the law; again, the response was in answer to a typical leading question, eg." Afternoon Bruce, why do you think I arrested you this time?", "er, because you think I stole these sheep?". 

If a copper should happen across someone with sheep in the Outback the conversation will probably go more like:

"G'day Bruce, you shearing?"
"No mate, I'm keeping these little beauts all for myself."

01/10/2012 at 17:53
Wilkie wrote (see)

Perhaps it was used as an abbreviation of LUSCIOUS?

It's completely this...what's the problem Blisters!?

 

It's not like that nonsense where bad or wicked mean good.

It's not the tedious overuse of words random or the loathsome "banter"

And it's certainly not the moronic copying of black american patois saying things like "was good" (what's good...ie what's up...ie how are you), or "all de girl dem", or similar nonsense.

1 to 20 of 55 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW Forums