MMR jab

1 to 20 of 22 messages
25/04/2013 at 18:28
I actually think it's really selfish not to get your kids immunised. Your kids may be fine getting measles but loads of other people they mix with won't be. I think we now take immunisation for granted a bit in the west and forget that it was only relatively recently that people died from things we assume no longer exist. I also find it weird how people trusted the opinions of one mad doc who was discredited by most of his profession and when the jabs had been thoroughly tested. But on the other side people are only too willing to buy remedies off the net containing god knows what that have never been tested properly or certified. Had all 3 kids done, didn't really think twice about it but I have lots of friends who didn't.
25/04/2013 at 18:31

Are there parents 'still' not getting their children vaccinated when it's offered?

I believe the current outbreak in South Wales is due to the fall in vaccinations a few years ago, with the link to Autism controversy, but assumed concerns over that had sufficiently been dealt with.

I suppose there will still always be parents who choose to decline, which is unfortunate for their own children, and the overall population.

K80
25/04/2013 at 18:50
My son is 15 years old and has not had the MMR vaccination. At that time there was a lot of negative press about possible cause of some form of autism and bowel problems. There was also a prominent doctor telling the media he wouldn't get his child vaccinated.

My son and god son were born were within weeks of each other. My godson had profound mental and physical disabilities. I was emotionally unable to make a decision that could potentially have an adverse impact on my perfect baby. I did ask to pay for the 3 vaccinations separately but that wasn't an option.

My son has now chosen to have the vaccination himself.
25/04/2013 at 19:03

of course everyone should have their children immunised.

but I do have some sympathy for the parents who didn't. there was a lot of conflicting information at the time. The BBC, for example, have since admitted that this was an example of an occasion where they gave equal weight to both sides of the argument (usually a laudable aim) when they probably shouldn't have.

sometimes you can be too balanced.

25/04/2013 at 20:22

I understand the local media in South Wales ran a scare story about the combined vaccination some years ago

26/04/2013 at 06:37
Measles is a horrible and potentially life threatening disease.
Get those kids jabbed.
26/04/2013 at 09:14
K80 wrote (see)
There was also a prominent doctor telling the media he wouldn't get his child vaccinated.

By prominent doctor you mean an idiot that everyone in the science community was laughing at and who has since been stuck off.

Never trust the media as a source of science findings. The average journalist doesn't understand how to critique and review a science journal. They only want to pull out bits of information with no context that make good headlines.

26/04/2013 at 09:19

The prominent Doctor was a clown - his work has been proved wrong by others. He just tried to make a name for himself.

26/04/2013 at 09:25

The local media all over the UK ran scare stories.  Fortunately, Wakefield has since had his badges taken away and has had a right kicking in the medical community, and deservedly so.

26/04/2013 at 09:56

Haven't we had this same thread about 2 weeks ago ?

26/04/2013 at 17:46
purpletrilady    pirate
27/04/2013 at 19:57

here's my story....

My brother (now 56) was effected by the wooping cough vaccine, he was born fine. He started having fits within 24 hrs of receiving the vaccine. He was left mentally handicapped.

when I has my children I did a lot of research and spoke to a few doctors. I was told that the injections had changed and been developed and that it would be safe for my children to have them. My eldest had all her injections no problem.

My son was fine until the MMR. 2 days after the MMR he developed a fever and then started to fit. You can imagine what was going through my mind. He was hospitalized for 48 hrs as the doctors were having a problem keeping his temperature down.

The doctors at the the hospital and my GP all said the fever was not connected to the jab. I simply did not believe them. My son had no more injections after that.

Roll forward 20 years. It is now accepted that MMR can cause high fevers and febrile fits and doctors now give advice how to deal with it. What made me angry was how dismissive the medical profession was as to my concerns. Nobody was prepared to even listen to me for five minutes. They all said it can't be connected as it was 48hrs later.

So I can understand the mistrust. The medical professions has a lot to answer for.

I'm glad I do not have to make the decision again. And if my children asked me for their kids ? I would probably say don't.

 

27/04/2013 at 22:46

I didn't have the whooping cough vaccine because of a scare about it causing fits. I got whooping cough instead and nearly died.

28/04/2013 at 04:12

Vaccinations: What they are aimed at versus potential side effects.

A man was asked once; even though he'd never met with an accident, why it was he choose to walk in the middle of the road.

He replied that the only time he'd heard of someone getting killed by a car, was while they were walking along the pavement.

Its a rational response to a situation. But also irrational. 

Depends on your view point.

28/04/2013 at 09:17

You stole that from David Carradine.

28/04/2013 at 10:43

Although the media promoted Wakefield's opinion a lot, it was one person against the rest of the medical profession.  There were plenty of articles on reputable and easily accessible health web sites such as the NHS and the Health Protection Agency which presented the other side of the story.  You didn't need to be a medical expert or read scientific journals to be able to make an informed decision.

With the exceptions of the few people, some of who told their stories above, who have had personal bad experiences with vaccines there was no reason for anyone not to get their child vacinated.  I'm tempted to say that those who chose to get their 'fact's from the newspapers deserve all they get, although that is a horrible thing to say as it wasn't them who suffered but their children.

To my mind the deeper question is why are we as a society so inclined to listen to sensationalism in the media rather than using common sense?  All the time we base our opinions on what the media tell us.  It is unfortunate that in this case the situation is one of live, death or disability rather than on which washing powder to use.

28/04/2013 at 10:51

To be fair the paper has about a dozen authors named on it and was published in the Lancet - and as noted in the previous thread the former chief medical officer seemed to think it was worth taking seriously.  Even the PM Tony Blair refused to say whether his kids had had MMR.   At least one major autism charity was taking it seriously too. 

Set against that the fact that measles was very unusual back then and it wasn't really such a straighforward decision.      

Fastforward to now - the paper has been discredited, measles is on the rise and it's easy to argue it was just one rogue doctor saying this at the time egged on by the media - but it wasn't.   

K80
28/04/2013 at 11:28
Eggyh73 wrote (see)
K80 wrote (see)
There was also a prominent doctor telling the media he wouldn't get his child vaccinated.

By prominent doctor you mean an idiot that everyone in the science community was laughing at and who has since been stuck off.

Never trust the media as a source of science findings. The average journalist doesn't understand how to critique and review a science journal. They only want to pull out bits of information with no context that make good headlines.

James B 73 wrote (see)

The prominent Doctor was a clown - his work has been proved wrong by others. He just tried to make a name for himself.

Well obviously if he'd had a sign hanging round his neck saying "idiot" or was wearing a curly wig and red nose I wouldn't have taken him seriously - unfortunately he wasn't but he did have far more knowledge of medicine than I did.

 

Intermanaut wrote (see)

The local media all over the UK ran scare stories.  Fortunately, Wakefield has since had his badges taken away and has had a right kicking in the medical community, and deservedly so.

 

SuperCaz wrote (see)

With the exceptions of the few people, some of who told their stories above, who have had personal bad experiences with vaccines there was no reason for anyone not to get their child vacinated.  I'm tempted to say that those who chose to get their 'fact's from the newspapers deserve all they get, although that is a horrible thing to say as it wasn't them who suffered but their children.

16 years ago we didn't have access to a computer or google to become qualified armchair experts. 

That's an outrageous thing to say supercaz, would you say it to their faces?

 

Edited: 28/04/2013 at 11:33
28/04/2013 at 11:46

I'm not afraid of saying things to people's faces, although I am careful about how I chose my words.  My husband used to say how I could get away with saying the most honest and horrible things to people but that they tended to like me and respect me for it

28/04/2013 at 14:40

An article in the Lancet is hardly "the newspapers" is it.    

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(97)11096-0/abstract

You are rewriting history to make it sound as if some quack made a claim that was picked up by the Sunday Sport.  

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