Most dangerous Job/Sport/Hobby

21 to 40 of 46 messages
20/03/2013 at 11:25
seren nos wrote (see)

I believe horse riding is statistically the most dangerous per numbers who participate

 

I would agree, after working with horses for 15 years, with the last 3 retraining problem horses I would have to say this is a very dangerous sport - mostly due to peoples stupidity! I used to play Polocrosse and during the 4 years I played, I saw a scary amount of people seriously injured compared to the low number of players in the UK. (once again this goes back to my previous comment os stoooopidity! lol)

EKGO wrote (see)

UK had approx 170 work fatalities last year, and 49 were in Construction but there were 2000 people killed on the roads, and a third 660 approx were driving either company vans or cars. So the job most likely to kill you is a driving job. 

Also agree with this! The roads are a bliming dangerous place to work!

Edited: 20/03/2013 at 11:27
20/03/2013 at 13:06

How's about mountain rescue - that's got to be pretty dangerous.

Or rope access. I knew a bloke that did rope access, he was copmpletely nutty. He worked on oil and gas installations in the middle east and africa. When he came back to England he'd go skydiving. We lost contact, but I wouldn't fancy his chances.

Mind you, give me that over being an 'Egyptian hot air balloon tourism operative' anyday.

seren nos yn canu    pirate
20/03/2013 at 14:25

snap....there have been no fatalities at all amongst egyptian hot air balloon operatives.........

so a safe job i think......compared to driving in egypt

21/03/2013 at 11:17

According to one website

 

1. Fisherman

2. Farm Worker

3. Oil/Gas rig workers

4.Construction

5. Commercial Lorry Driver

Probably about right.  So why do we always here about firemen or Policemen risking their lives to save others when in reality it's a pretty cushty job by a fishermans standards?

122 people died cycling in 2012? Thats got to be up there as cycling on the road is one thing that scares the s**t out of me

21/03/2013 at 11:31

Probably right DF, but London cyclists don't help themselves by wearing headphones and that complete fool last week, actually cycling along in Southwark on the phone. Most too are colour blind with the inability to differentiate between red and green at those pretty light thingees.

21/03/2013 at 11:45
seren nos wrote (see)

maybe because with only about 30 grand prix drivers at the time 1 death made the statistics a bit high.........

 

I always think its trange to have charities for todays fishermen and soldiers who lose their lives doing their jobs............you never see a charity to help builders  and construction workers who lose their lives doing their jobs..........

is it just from a historical point that these charities were set up.............now adays when no one is made to do any job..where people chose the jobs because of their love of it or becuase they think the rewards out weigh the risks..........why do people give to the charities  .. when if others die then there is no charity to help.........isn't it up to evryone to make provisions for their loved ones in case they die

seren nos wrote (see)

maybe because with only about 30 grand prix drivers at the time 1 death made the statistics a bit high.........

 

I always think its trange to have charities for todays fishermen and soldiers who lose their lives doing their jobs............you never see a charity to help builders  and construction workers who lose their lives doing their jobs..........

is it just from a historical point that these charities were set up.............now adays when no one is made to do any job..where people chose the jobs because of their love of it or becuase they think the rewards out weigh the risks..........why do people give to the charities  .. when if others die then there is no charity to help.........isn't it up to evryone to make provisions for their loved ones in case they die

There is one for construction workers... http://www.lighthouseclub.org/

21/03/2013 at 13:35
David Falconer 3 wrote (see)

I reckon most of those cyclists probably died in London. You must be mad to cycle in London. Im forever dodging vans just randomly reversing into narrow streets, and thats just walking.

 

14 of them were in London so statistically pretty high. 

21/03/2013 at 14:31

"Both his legs got severed by the wheels of the freight car. After this accident he was hospitalized"

Thank goodness, two Bandaids and a drop of Savlon can only do so much !

21/03/2013 at 14:38

I'd say that being a trawlerman has to be the most dangerous occupation. Working in rough seas where if you fall in the water during the winter you'd die from hypothermia in minutes.

Blisters    pirate
22/03/2013 at 22:37

Here are some things to think about when reviewing these statistics. The numbers themselves may be accurate, I don’t know, but the basis behind any analysis can be flawed.

Let us take BASE jumping. They quote 9 deaths annually in Norway. Why is that, when Norway has got a population in that particular region of just 20,850? (National population estimated 5M.) If we compare it to Wales, population estimate 3M, should we expect 6 per year?

I see on the BASE jumper’s website http://base-jumping.eu/base-jumping-fatality-list/

100 recorded deaths, their location and their reason. The time period is 1981 to 1991, across the whole world.  4 were recorded in the UK, and none in Belgium, Ireland or Netherlands.
Does this make BASE Jumping in the UK safer than Norway? Er, no. The jumps in the UK are terrifyingly short. There are some buildings in London, some very short cliffs in Cheddar or elsewhere, and some High Voltage pylons near to the Severn Bridge. I don’t recall seeing any cliffs or skyscrapers in Belgium or Netherlands. So is it safer to jump off a short building in Belgium? References to the European Commission may have validity at this point.

In Norway the cliffs are nothing if not huge. They are also well known within the BASE brotherhood. So people travel to jump them.

-

I was always told that one of the most dangerous activities was cave diving. The Vicar asserts that proper planning prevents p poor performance. Yes, but when it goes pear shaped, the thing about cave diving is that you CAN’T just float up and get a rescue. That’s what you do when Open Water diving. Even in a wreck you may have to back track to get out, and that could mean turning around in an impossible space. With cave diving you are combining the hard work of caving, with navigating unexplored underwater passages in pitch black and zero visibility. The underwater river could go into spate. Radios don’t work. Rescue is pretty much impossible.

http://www.cavediver.net/forum/showthread.php/4759-Cave-Diver-fatalities

Varying statistics appear: 1:1125 dives, or 1:14 cave divers die doing the sport. Apparently an experienced cave diver is 39 times more likely to survive a dive than his counterpart from 26 years ago.  I recall being told that the death rate was 1:3 cave divers around that time.

-

On another note, I don’t see any entries for some other hazardous activities:
-golf (primary risk is lightning strike, secondary risk is unconnected heart failure)
-angling (risks again are lightning, contacting overhead power with carbon fibre rods, and finally drowning)

I’m off to play with numbers....

Blisters    pirate
22/03/2013 at 22:57

Here's an interesting consideration for you. This is factually accurate, I know because I was there. In 1984 to 1986 Maggie's second army, ie the construction business, went down to the Falklands to build her a brand new strategic airfield. Or civil airport as it was called. In that 2 year period the average number of employees on site was 2000, and we went through about 7500 in total, most of them surviving the experience, just employee churn. The total number of man hours was estimated for the period, and the UK accident rate utilised as a basis for calculating how many coffins we needed to take. The answer was 6. Interestingly, in the two years that I was there we indeed suffered 6 deaths, but not all needed coffins, as 2 were lost overboard on the transit sailing to South Africa. Arguably, they don't count. Arguably, 2 others don't count as they were off-duty and alcohol related. The remaining 2 were definitely on site.

Just a question, what's the death rate for the Army infantry? What about SAS? How specific do we want to be?
In construction, there are sub divisions. Motorway cone washing is dodgy. Those guys can't get life assurace or mortgages. They all know someone who's not there now.

In today's traffic conditions, the live carriageway of any highway is a very dangerous place to work.  An Oxford University study ranked it as the 16th most hazardous occupation in the UK.  In 2005 HTMA reported 5 deaths and 12 major injuries - more than twice the number of fatalities of any of the previous five years.  And all the fatalities were caused by workers being struck by oncoming vehicles.Between 2003 and 2008, 11 road workers were killed and 104 were seriously injured on motorways and major routes in England (Source – Highways Agency)
Blisters    pirate
22/03/2013 at 23:10

Please

Next time you drive through a set of road works, if it says 50 limit, please go at the speed limit, even if you can't see anyone. They may be up ahead, just setting it out, or waiting to walk across the live motorway with a 6 foot square sign. The road is narrow and you need space to be able to have some reaction time.

And don't think that those crash cushion lorries are like having an impact with a feather bed. When hit from behind, the IPV driver typically needs hospitalisation and 3 months off work for the physical damage. The mental damage is permanent.

23/03/2013 at 12:13

Roadworks! I couldn't injury anyone at roadworks if I was a trained sniper! there's never anyone there

Blisters    pirate
23/03/2013 at 14:21

Troll

 

23/03/2013 at 14:37

Blisters. Read every word. Valid points.

Blisters    pirate
23/03/2013 at 20:31

I reckon that anyone caught speeding through roadworks should be made to stand inside the "safe zone" for 30 minutes. For information of the unenlightened, that places your feeble frame of intantly destroyable skin, bone and blood a mere 4 feet away from the live traffic.

Can an engineer please calculate the kinetic energy carried by a 1500kg car travelling at a mere 50mph? What about a 40T truck?

What is the stopping power of a 1m high plastic road cone? (Clue: it's zero).

If I was harsh and vindictive I'd say that culprits should go out on a debris cleansing duty after a fatal incident. But I think that may be too much. The people that do that duty are what we call "Battle hardened".

23/03/2013 at 21:04

The most dangerous thing I have ever done, and I still go on doing, is surfing.  I have nearly drowned once and got pulled up a rock face once.  I am always wary, constantly sussing the conditions and the currents.  Respect the sea. 

 

Workwise, Blisters you have my respect!

23/03/2013 at 21:25

I have been loking on the internet.  In 2002 57 million people died.  5% from AIDS/HIV, that is 2.35 million people (Manchester and Liverpool, ans everywhere in between).

24/03/2013 at 07:07
Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)

I think if you do a dangerous hobby it's your concern and good luck with it. A dangerous job, well you have a choice, so don't do it, it's not going to be worth it in the end. We all have a duty to family to keep ourselves away from danger

Some people will do anything for money. They want money more than they want life itself.

Its like when the character played by Clint Eastwood asked the bounty hunter why he did it, the bounty hunter said "just making a living", Eastwood replied, "Dying ain't much of a living".

Edited: 24/03/2013 at 07:10
OW
24/03/2013 at 08:50
A friend took a job truck dring in Iraq. Huge pay, high risk.

I think Blisters makes some very good points about standing next to cones when cars fly past at high speed. I used to have a v poor attitude to driving through roadworks but when they brought in average speed cameras I changed (am ashamed it was that that changed my behaviour) It's one speed camera I'm pleased exists. It's hard to ignore the temptation to speed when the rest of the traffic is flying past. This makes me ..and everyone else

I think many people doing high risk jobs do them for either money or the thrill seeing. There is a difference between road construction, nursing (believe this is good job to get assaulted in!) and diving/mountain rescue as cause or motivation
OW
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