Shortlisting for a job, what stands out on a CV/app form

17 messages
03/07/2012 at 10:36

Once had a CV from a young lady, Not only did she tick all the right boxes when it came to filling the advertised post, listing her hobby as part time glamour model got her an instant interview....

... and although perfect for the role, she would have been very distracting around the office !!

03/07/2012 at 10:52

Depends on the job for me (intern, manager).  In the world of social media/linkedin/xing - i dont think the CV plays such a big role anymore as they can get more information out of google but some initial no-no's for me are:

- Formatting. If it's not easy to the eye and readable - I think it says a lot about the person

- Colours. I've received one CV that was on psychedelic paper. For a Managing Director Position it just gave off the wrong impression

- Spelling errors/gross gramatical errors (you're, your, their, there)

03/07/2012 at 11:19

Spelling and grammar for me as well. Apart from being a general bugbear, I think it says a lot about a person if they don't go to the effort to make sure their CV is spelt correctly with apostrophes in the right places.

03/07/2012 at 11:45

Spelling and grammar a real issue for me as well.  I also don't think adding Socialising as a hobby or interest adds too much to an application. We have a telephone interview as first interview for my office and that is an incredibly good filter for some types of job

Nam
03/07/2012 at 12:15

We don't accept CVs.

We get a lot of applications by people who can not evidence that they meet the person spec, so those get binned.  For God's sake read the bloody person spec.

Beyond that, a general inability to string a coherent sentence together gets my goat as most of the jobs I'm involved with recruiting involve quite high level report writing.

03/07/2012 at 12:26

Spelling and grammar (you just knew I'd say that, didn't you?!)

If people can't be bothered to check the spelling, or ask someone to do that for them, it says a lot about their attention to detail.

If they can't be bothered on their CV or application form, when will they be bothered?

 

03/07/2012 at 12:31

Phew - from what you've all said so far my CV is at the very least coherent, well presented and not on horrible coloured paper so I'm a quarter of the way there!

Distracting myself from my next round of applications by clearing up the flat.

03/07/2012 at 13:17
Nam wrote (see)

For God's sake read the bloody person spec.

 

as a recruiter, that's the one thing that's guaranteed to ge on my tits as it's wasting my frigging time - I could give you loads of others but that would take to long but let's just put things like spelling, grammar, dates, layout, pictures and family details on there as examples.  seriously, I don't need to know how many kids, their names, ages, where they go to school etc.

what stands out?  those that meet the job spec and can construct a decent profile as to why they think they are right.  they'll get a call from us

03/07/2012 at 13:51

ahhh the spambots felt left out...poor loves.

03/07/2012 at 17:10

Hello!  Thanks for all these tips!  They are very helpful!  I'm actually from the states (Texas) and have been really, really, really wanting to work in the UK for quite some time now.  I have sent out a bunch of CV's in England (and of course resumes here too).  I was definitely curious as to what is noticed more on a CV.  Would anyone on here be willing to receive my CV and circulate it if you have time?  I just graduated in May with a Bachelor of Science in Communication (Hons).  Thank you very much!!!

Edited: 03/07/2012 at 17:12
Dark Vader    pirate
03/07/2012 at 17:44

Pretty much all of the above...   plus leaving out the obvious point of why they want the job and why I should give it to them...!

 

03/07/2012 at 18:04

Overly flowery personal statements, which flatter the intended organisation to a laughable degree are a real turn off...... "I've wanted to work in XXXXXXX since I was 6 months old, it has always been my dream job to work in your centre of exceleeence......."

03/07/2012 at 20:19
I do not currently recruit though i have in the past and I have often looked over cvs from applicants to mrs puffy.

Neat and tidy, well presented. Concise clear statements of skills abilities and training go far, Demonstration that the applicant has read the job description and understands the role.

Don't care about hobbies interests and social life, that's for interview.

The last time I got a job through a recruiter, they completely stripped my cv down before presenting it to the employer. Ive never bothered with the irrelevances since and I have always been interviewed for the jobs I applied for.
03/07/2012 at 20:30
All the above, plus an indication that they have done some homework on what your organisation actually does. And agree - hobbies and interests aren't that relevant, unless you're someone straight out of school/university with no work experience to speak of.
04/07/2012 at 09:26
MeghanTM wrote (see)

Hello!  Thanks for all these tips!  They are very helpful!  I'm actually from the states (Texas) and have been really, really, really wanting to work in the UK for quite some time now.  I have sent out a bunch of CV's in England (and of course resumes here too).  I was definitely curious as to what is noticed more on a CV.  Would anyone on here be willing to receive my CV and circulate it if you have time?  I just graduated in May with a Bachelor of Science in Communication (Hons).  Thank you very much!!!

Meghan - one thing that may hold you back from getting a job in the UK will be your UK visa status.   we work in permanent recruitment and get loads of applications from non-UK nationals - unless they have the right to work in the UK on a permanent basis (EU national, ancestry visas, Tier1 etc) then frankly our clients aren't interested.   if your visa is temporary it may also have restrictions on the type of work you can do and of course how long you can work.   so if applying for jobs, only apply for ones appropriate to your visa status.

05/07/2012 at 00:37

Thank you for that advice!  Unfortunately, I am still in the states right now with no visa or permit to work in the UK.  I do understand that many places will not consider a candidate unless he/she already has a work permit/visa, but I also believe that I cannot get a visa without a job offer.  It's a catch 22.  This is of course just based on the little I know about visas and what not.  I may be wrong here though.  Do you think it would be better to already be in the UK and then look for the job/visa or would it not matter?  Thank you again!!

Dark Vader    pirate
05/07/2012 at 07:51

Meghan..  I think you need to get here and get a visa sorted first...  and then look for work..

When I was working as a tour manager, I had to get the work visa's organised for the non-European's in the band and crew.  Its not a hard task, but there is a lot of paperwork involved and a fee to pay and it can take ages...!!    One of the questions on the form is something like  "why do you need to work in UK?"  and another is  "is it unlikely that your chosen job could be offered to a UK resident?".  Not precise words but something like that and I hope you get the point...  and there are taxation issues too..

These are not easy questions to answer...    so..  I suggest you find a way to get here and get some kind of work visa and then look for a job...

 


We'd love you to add a comment! Please login or take half a minute to register as a free member
17 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW Forums