Skincare products: Just a rip off?

Or do any of them work?

41 to 60 of 103 messages
02/11/2009 at 17:43

As I understand it moisturiser is mostly a mixture of oil and water (forming an emulsion).  It works by forming a layer on the skin which traps the moisture and stops the skin drying out.  This is the same whether you get an expensive or cheap product. 

 When they throw in the sciencey bit they do things like add collagen as was mentioned before.   This works by helping tighten the skin and reduces fine lines.  The way it does this is quite simple, when in the pot you can think of it as a along stretched out spring.  Yet when you slap it on your face the collagen starts to dry out and this causes the spring to shorten, thus tightening your skin. Additionaly some companies add various vitamins or whatever, while some of these have proven clinical effects the amounts that can legally be added to cosmetics are next to useless.

02/11/2009 at 17:52

The way for ladies to keep wrinkle free is to keep out of the sun - end of.









Its why my butt is wrinkle free.

02/11/2009 at 17:52
Pics available on request.
02/11/2009 at 17:54
Hoose - years ago people had rubbish skin - that'd be the smallpox then.
02/11/2009 at 18:01
02/11/2009 at 18:10

interesting Vixx -just wonderin' who funded this study?

another danger was suggested. If there is an active ingredient, what gets sold in the shop may not contain enough of it. However, when it is seen to contain the active ingredient at whatever level, a product would sell well.

Edited: 02/11/2009 at 18:10
02/11/2009 at 18:12

I know.  From what I understand from a research study I read a while back, apparently the expense of the cream didn't matter as long as it was predominantly Vitamin A within it.  Cheaper creams did the same as the expensive ones. 

I use natural products from Origins.  They are expensive but have to be used sparingly, so they last longer but have no petrochemicals in them.

02/11/2009 at 18:20
It's a good point Hoose - the problem is I have so many journals and studies, I can't remember where I read it first.  The BBC page was not the first thing I read.
02/11/2009 at 18:23
02/11/2009 at 18:24

I guess the key thing is to find something that feels and smells nice and doesn't irritate your skin whilst having a bit of sun protection.  Oh, and something sweat proof would be nice although impossible.

I struggle to be honest. Always end up being sandpapered with salt after a run and pick up freckles after running in the worst weather but if I use anything with an spf in it I end up sweating even more than normal. 

I use an origins one from time to time - white tea somethng or other. Really nice composition and seems to keep the wind off a bit (if that makes sense).

Nothing beats teenage spot cream even as an almost 40 something

02/11/2009 at 18:25
and does anything really beat a bit of botox or juvederm?  even my dentist has had it  and looks fab! 
02/11/2009 at 18:26
May have been a good study Vixx but these days you have to wade through hype and marketing and find original and the funders before you get the real story. Most peops dont get beyond the hype.
Edited: 02/11/2009 at 18:27
Farnie    pirate
02/11/2009 at 18:27
Sorry if someones already posted but I am on a carp connection. Didn't that nice lady proffessor with the gorgjus shoes do something on this which led to boots running out of protect and perfectbecause she proved it worked
02/11/2009 at 18:28
If I have a teenage spot GA, I nurture it
02/11/2009 at 18:30

Hoose - reading this made me wonder how 'independent' the researchers were.....

http://edition.cnn.com/HEALTH/9804/23/skin.vitamins/index.html

02/11/2009 at 18:32
bit sus that
02/11/2009 at 18:35

Seems that the study mentioned in the BBC article isn't clearly reported.  From looking it up online they added retinol to a regular moisturiser with none in ie the reserachers made their own cream.  So they dont show the effect using over the counter moisturiser. Its discussed here

Retinol and skin care

However creams containing high levels of retinol are only given if you have a prescription.  So the question becomes, are the levels of retinol high enough in over the conunter creams to do any good? My guess is probably not.

02/11/2009 at 18:36

Its all snake oil and flim-flammery!

- Johnny Blaze

(Filmed with lash inserts, enhanced in post-production)

02/11/2009 at 18:57
ALDI - day & night cream, only £1.99. Came out top last year when tested alongside other brands. Well, it works for me, and quite happy to slap it on and carry spare for gym. I do use no 7 for their sun facial cream though and have for years, as it softens my skin on holiday and doesn't run into my sensitive (contact lens) eyes when I'm sweating.
02/11/2009 at 18:58
An industry source tole me its laced with monkey spunk...
41 to 60 of 103 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW competitions

RW Forums