Something for the Grammar Nazis

quiz in The Gruaniad

1 to 20 of 44 messages
06/02/2013 at 14:11

Guardian grammar quiz.

Managed 12 out of 14, with some educated guesswork.

Can someone explain the answer to number 8, and also what a "gerund" is?

06/02/2013 at 14:17

no 8 - unless you know what abstract and collective mean, you're pretty bolloxed!

 

06/02/2013 at 14:18

I got 14 (do we have a smug emoticon?)

Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

A gerund is a verb in the participle form (-ing) but operating as a noun. As in, what do you think of my running? (I think that's right, someone smarter or more pedantic will be along shortly).

cougie    pirate
06/02/2013 at 14:21
10. I don't remember any of this from school. I suspect none of it was invented back then.
06/02/2013 at 14:22

Yoohoo, Wilkie, over here sweetie

06/02/2013 at 14:25
Muttley wrote (see)

Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

Facepalm.

I forgot sometimes words have two meanings.

06/02/2013 at 14:29
Tom77 wrote (see)
Muttley wrote (see)

Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

Facepalm.

I forgot sometimes words have two meanings.

that would make you a bit pissed - or maybe pissed.... 

06/02/2013 at 14:36

The answer to number 8 is because "Pride" can be both a collective noun (as in a pride of lions), or an abstract noun (as in pride before a fall).

I had to have 'gerund' explained to me. Apparently it's a noun that can be used as a verb e.g. Teacher becomes Teaching.

 

Oops... cross post with all of the above.

Edited: 06/02/2013 at 14:38
06/02/2013 at 14:38

Which is pretty much what I said, innit?

06/02/2013 at 14:39

some people are just too slow these days eh Mutts??

06/02/2013 at 14:40

There were only 2 posts when I strated typing

 

06/02/2013 at 14:42

JF gets a good gerundive spanking for not paying attention

06/02/2013 at 14:57
Muttley wrote (see)

 

Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

 


D'oh!  12, because I was only considering a single meaning of pride (as in take pride) and trying to work out whether it was both abstract and collective, and because I didn't know what a gerund was until I Googled it just now.

Arse!

06/02/2013 at 15:00

13 - I wasn't sure about the gerund either.

And to be pedantic....  is the first question really about grammar?  Is it not just understanding of what a word means?

06/02/2013 at 15:07

Wilkie, I declare you a second-degree grammar nazi, taking a grammar quiz to task!  (Can you imagine how many times they checked this article before it went to print?!)

06/02/2013 at 15:16

In the first question you have to identify the word that is in the role of antonym, so yes I would argue that it is a grammar question.

06/02/2013 at 15:29

I suppose, I'd overlooked the fact that you do have to know what an antonym is!

06/02/2013 at 15:34

Stray comma there, Wilkie

06/02/2013 at 15:40

The 'I suppose' was saying that I agreed with you (I suppose you are right), the rest of the sentence was why I agreed with you.

 

06/02/2013 at 15:52

13 out of 14. Fuck you, Lynne Truss.

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