Tips How To Save Your Energy Bills

Compliments From First Utility - Britains biggest independent energy firm

21 to 37 of 37 messages
06/01/2014 at 14:43

Unless you live in a tower block...

06/01/2014 at 15:02

Yeah but come on who does?

06/01/2014 at 16:03

Somebody must, I see lights on at night 

Blisters    pirate
06/01/2014 at 16:19

Just a thought about that suggestion of opening the oven door.

Whether the temperature inside the oven equalises with the kitchen quickly or slowly is utterly irrelevant. The same heat will dissipate into the same kitchen. The money's already been spent on heating up the air.

What the article did omit was the real opportunities to save money. I am ignoring the sex argument here, because we all know that ends up being hideously expensive.

1- Draught sealing, if your windows allow enough air in that your curtains move, then there's too much leakage.

2- Close the curtains once the temperature starts to drop, not just when it goes dark.

3- That old fridge in the garage? The one containing a bottle of white wine and 4 beers? Unplug it and open the door.

4- If you've got TRVs fitted to radiators, checks whether you really have got a reasonable balance of heat in the different rooms. A tiny toilet room doesn't need to be roasting, nor does a hallway. A kitchen doesn't need radiator heat output if you actually cook in there. If you've got a conservatory, and don't use it in winter, just put frost stat level of heating into it, and lock the door.

5- wear a vest

06/01/2014 at 16:33
XFR Bear wrote (see)

You could organise a shower sharing scheme with a neighbour

 

it might soon be forced upon you by the govt if you dare to claim benefits.

06/01/2014 at 18:15
Blisters wrote (see)

Just a thought about that suggestion of opening the oven door.

Whether the temperature inside the oven equalises with the kitchen quickly or slowly is utterly irrelevant. The same heat will dissipate into the same kitchen. The money's already been spent on heating up the air.

It depends where your oven is situated. If the oven backs onto the party wall with next door (e.g. the oven has to go there because the gas pipe into the kitchen is there), you would probably lose more heat to next door through the back of the oven if you leave the oven door closed after using it, than if you opened the oven door and let the residual heat out into your kitchen.

 

 

 

XX1
06/01/2014 at 21:32
Screamapillar wrote (see)
Blisters wrote (see)
XX1 wrote (see)

Here's an idea that's cheaper than microwaving...  Two days a week, in the morning wrap your left-overs in foil and pop them on a radiator...  Come the evening they'll be plenty warm enough to eat.

 

Yeah, nice one, a great suggestion for developing rampant cultures of food poisoning bacteria......or have I been suckered by an obvious troll, XX1 (or should I say Lit)?

I think it may have been a joke.

 

Indeed it was intended as a joke; however, I have it on good authority that Burgess Cooper (whistleblower in the Dowty Rotol fraud case) really did used to do this.

XX1
Blisters    pirate
17/01/2014 at 18:03

Rest in Peace

17/01/2014 at 22:34

That old fridge in the garage? It'll be far more efficient if you put more wine and beer in it.

XX1
18/01/2014 at 19:57

Blisters -- you could save on your energy bill by wearing a toupee and turning your heating down 

XX1
08/02/2014 at 00:50

Don't store your hot water at 50C unless you want to increase your likely hood of legionnaires disease....60C minimum

08/02/2014 at 09:11

How the feck do first-time posters even dig up these old threads?

08/02/2014 at 17:28

Its bollocks anyway there is no instances of legionella in domestic water systems, its a ploy by the water treatment firms based on misinterpretation of the the risks since a few infamous cases 

Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
09/02/2014 at 12:08

I'm probably going to get hammered for this post with all the flood water around in England but there really are easy ways to save money - we have saved literally hundreds over the past few years by not chucking water away. We re-use waste water from washing up and from the washing machine for outdoor stuff such as cleaning the steps, the patio and the dog runs, also use it down the toilets instead of flushing which uses up to 40 litres of fresh water each time. Last time our water meter was read the council guy was very suspicious at the low reading, he obviously thought we were fiddling the meter somehow,

09/02/2014 at 19:59

How do you get the water out of the washing machine?

Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
11/02/2014 at 11:48

Simple - we have the waste water pipe feeding into a large water butt instead of down the drain. There's a tap low down on the side of the water butt so we can fill up a bucket from there.

11/02/2014 at 20:44

Thanks, I had images of trying to bucket the water out of the front of the machine!!!  It's a good idea


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