Why do the majority of the great British public...

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12/09/2012 at 11:52
Stevie G . wrote (see)

It's an easy question for the likes of us on here to ask, as we're the other side of the unfit-fit boundary.

I remember being very unfit, and it's all such tough work on the buildup.

Once you are fit, it's  easy to keep motivated and stay that way.

 


I think that's pretty much it, same goes for attitude to food. If you've always lived on convenience food or takeaway, then it's going to seem like a lot of effort to buy fresh produce and prepare healthy meals.

And all those little things like getting used to reduced portion sizes, not having three courses every time you go out for a meal, ordering americanos instead of mocha-bomb-caramel-explosion-with-extra-whipped-cream when you go to Starbucks ... it all takes time and effort to start with, and a lot of people just can't be arsed.

12/09/2012 at 12:00

I actually know a guy (with much more money than sense) who paid for gastric band op because he wanted to lose weight. I asked him if he had considered losing weight through changing his diet and exercising first, and he said that he couldn't be bothered. He didn't like exercising and he didn't like grocery shopping so lived on takeaway or ate out in restaurants.

He had the money for the operation, so he had the money to pay for a personal trainer and even one of those ridiculously expensive services that deliver healthy prepreared meals to you every day. But he didn't have the motivation or willpower to lose weight that way so had the operation, now he has lost weight purely because he physically can't eat too much - it's pretty miserable if you ask me.

12/09/2012 at 12:13

It's a chore, and it always will be.  People have better things to do with their time than dragging an already-tired carcass out in the rain to run, cycle, swim x miles a week.

12/09/2012 at 12:18
kittenkat wrote (see)

make the lifestyle choice to ignore any need to be healthy or fit in an active lifestyle?

It's a buzz, not a chore surely?

There's a difference between an active lifestyle, and being active during 'leisure' time. For most people, work nowadays doesn't involve physical activity as it would have done for generations past. And even for those who are active, the composition and availability of foods are not the same as they once were. Energy dense, fat laden products are at hand pretty much anywhere you go, so the level of activity needed to compensate for consumption of such foods far exceeds what most people do in the day to day, and even in modest leisure time activity. 

I've said it before, but it's a very complex issue that involves features that the individual has little control over, or are restricted by income. 

12/09/2012 at 12:23

As someone who has been obese, I might have looked as though I was ignoring the need to be active, but inside I was burning up with shame at the size I had allowed myself to become, and the fear of the changes that I was going to have to make to get my life back.

While it may seem as though getting out and exercising is the obvious answer for people who find themselves overweight and suffering with health problems, there are often unhelpful, negative, destructive emotions bubbling away beneath the surface. People have to be in the right frame of mind to start implementing life changes, and it can be difficult to get to that point.

It doesn't help that exercise is so much more difficult when you are carrying extra weight- as anyone who has ever tried to run while obese or overweight will verify. Imagine running with a sack of potatoes on your back, except they don't stay in one place but jiggle and ripple and chafe and sweat and bounce with every step that you take. Thank God these are now memories and not present day...

12/09/2012 at 13:11

There are so many factors in determining behaviour - psychological, emotional, social, financial, physical, knowledge, past experience, local amenities, skill... Personal choice is influenced by all of them. I'd love to take up surfing, but I can't simply choose to do so and make it happen. For a start, I can't afford it. Then there's the issue of not living near the sea, living in an environment that doesn't really lend itself to good conditions for the sport, and not having the first clue as to how to surf. I could make it happen, but I'd need to invest a lot of time and money into doing so, and with working conditions and pay what they are, that just isn't going to happen. 

I know there are lots of other options over surfing, I'm just using it to illustrate a point. Plus I'd quite like to learn to surf

 

12/09/2012 at 16:15

It's easy to overeat. It's easy not to exercise. Becoming a fat slob is the default position unless a person develops a strategy to produce some other outcome for themselves.

12/09/2012 at 16:43
Stevie G . wrote (see)

It's an easy question for the likes of us on here to ask, as we're the other side of the unfit-fit boundary.

I remember being very unfit, and it's all such tough work on the buildup.

Once you are fit, it's  easy to keep motivated and stay that way.

 

Pretty much what this guy said!

l dont think there's anybody out there who genuinely prefers to be overweight and unfit. Even the most idiotic person out there knows that an under active lifestyle combined is dangerous and a fast pass to an early grave.

l first took up exercise when l started feeling size 34 jeans getting tight, when people in my local pub started taking the piss about the weight l was putting on and when l looked at myself in the shower and could no longer see the end of my 10" pecker*

It was excruciatingly difficult for the first month, l ached like a bugger everytime l woke up the morning after a night at military fitness training and l thought my lungs and chest were about to collapse if l attempted to run more than a quarter of a mile.

People as a general rule are not prepared to look past that first month and as we live in a society where everything and anything is available in an instant people are no longer willing to wait to see results for something.

Regular exercise is the mirror opposite of never budging from the sofa. They both become a habit the longer you do them for and breaking either habit takes a lot of effort and people struggle to adjust to the opposite of what they're used to.

The longer you leave it before actuallly getting your arse off the couch, the worse you begin to look and eventually, the older you get, the more likely you are to just accept that you will remain in a state of incactivity.

*One of the 3 statements above is incorrect

12/09/2012 at 23:48

I guess we need a National Fitness & Health Day then, when everyone pursues healthy life choices in terms of diet and exercise for 24 hours.

Slogan, "Do it for a day, then do it for a lifetime."

12/09/2012 at 23:53

And how would that be enforced? 

 

12/09/2012 at 23:54

....or even encouraged?

Edited: 12/09/2012 at 23:54
13/09/2012 at 00:27

It wouldn't be enforced. This is a free country.

It would be encouraged through the media. 

13/09/2012 at 08:20

Haven't we got something like it that the Government is doing, Change for Life?

13/09/2012 at 08:31
The government an do all they like. People aren't physically sick they are mentally thick.
13/09/2012 at 09:11
300m to school. The bird over the road takes the car. And she goes home after
13/09/2012 at 10:38
kittenkat wrote (see)
Colin McLaughlin wrote (see)

It's easy to overeat. It's easy not to exercise. Becoming a fat slob is the default position unless a person develops a strategy to produce some other outcome for themselves.

But it's not easy to overeat unless you've trained your body to overeat.

But people have been doing exactly that for years! Show the average British person how big (small?) one portion of pasta or meat is supposed to be and watch their jaws drop in disbelief.

I'm not sure about these government health slogans - look at the way 5 a day has been appropriated by food manufacturers. There are so many products emblazened with stickers announcing they contain "1 of your 5 a day" (baked beans, cheese and tomato pizza, flapjacks, carbonated fruit flavoured drinks) that I wouldn't be surprised if some people thought they were getting their 5 a day without ever going near a piece of fresh fruit or vegetable!

13/09/2012 at 11:02

...because towelling jogging bottoms and tracksuits are so comfy.. ?

But, look around properly - it's becoming the norm now.  The 'Great British Public' are bigger than they were, and it's only the extreme examples that are now subject to comment.

13/09/2012 at 11:11
kittenkat wrote (see)
Colin McLaughlin wrote (see)

It's easy to overeat. It's easy not to exercise. Becoming a fat slob is the default position unless a person develops a strategy to produce some other outcome for themselves.

But it's not easy to overeat unless you've trained your body to overeat.

It's really, really not hard - a second helping here, a couple more roast potatoes there, pudding after dinner, a few Pringles while you watch the tv.  Another Stella

It soon adds up, and the weight goes on, and on.

13/09/2012 at 11:23

Portion size is interesting. I know a few folk who when measuring out pasta or rice have way more than I'd ever use even when carb loading.

In fact many have questioned how I can train for marathons on so little food, as they assume due to the portion sizes they eat that you need to consume tons of food to be able to run for that long. In fact I'd say a classic new runners mistake is often over fuelling. I know I did when I first started running.

I say that as someone who is really greedy and a food lover too. I do love to stuff my face, but I do think that running helped me understand what I need to eat to fuel myself rather than what I thought I needed.

I'd also say government information on food is appalling. The five a day campaign is a joke. There is no science behind it and even worse if that five is all fruit the sugar levels would be through the roof. Just look at people having "healthy" smoothies. They may want to check the sugar content of that "healthy" drink. Sure it's got vitamins, but it makes full fat coke look like the diet option.

13/09/2012 at 11:42

So a pear, an apple an orange, a grapefruit and a tomato a day would lead to massive weight gain?

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