Why do the majority of the great British public...

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13/09/2012 at 11:47

No, but drinking a litre carton of fruit smoothie every day (250ml is good for you, so of course 1000ml must be four times better for you) and then thinking that because you've been so healthy with your smoothie so you can treat yourself to a donut mid-afternoon will lead to weight gain. I sit opposite someone who does exactly that every day!

13/09/2012 at 12:08

Smoothies are a different matter, but Eggyh73 seemed to say that eating 5 pieces of fruit a day would be incredibly bad for you.

13/09/2012 at 12:13

Smoothies are very high in sugar content, so if you're aim is to lose weight they are a bad option. Eating lots of fruit, which I do enjoy myself is good for vitamin intake but most fruits are naturally high in sugar.

The five a day thing falls over as there is no scientific logic that can be applied to it. It's really just marketing. For instance an average sized orange contains more calories and sugar than a two finger kitkat. Is an orange healthier? Well yes, as it provides vitamins that the body needs. Will eating an orange rather than a kitkat aid weight loss? No, it wouldn't. Also look at the marketing hype on many store products that have massive "low fat" labels. Low in fat sure, but for many then go compare the sugar content versus the full fat version. Pretty much without fail the full fat version is lower in sugar.

No wonder people get confused when they are bombarded with "healthy" and by healthy they really mean weight loss aiding products that aren't actually going to aid weight loss.

EDIT: I'm not saying fruit is bad for you. What I'm saying if your goal is weight loss then many popular fruits aren't the best option. There would be far less calories and sugar in pretty much any vegetable than there would be in fruit. The point I'm making is we are selling a flawed concept with this five a day, which companies have picked with and now brand their products with such as smoothies.

Edited: 13/09/2012 at 12:18
13/09/2012 at 12:22

It is easy to overeat, KK. That's the problem. 2000/2500 calories doesn't go far if you're spreading it over three meals in a day. Unless a person is being careful, they will overeat.

13/09/2012 at 12:40
Can I get one of those viscous cycles?
13/09/2012 at 12:43

Are they a little more substantial than a vicious cycle?

13/09/2012 at 12:53
Eggyh73 wrote (see)

I'd also say government information on food is appalling. The five a day campaign is a joke. There is no science behind it 

Actually, there's significant evidence that increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is beneficial to health. The five-a-day campaign is based on the science behind fruit and veg consumption, and also on dietary patterns of the population. Ideally, you'd eat at least 12 a day - of fruit and veg. But considering that the public, on average, only ate 2 portions of f&v a day, then the figure of five was used as an achieveable goal. Better to increase somewhat then set a target that many would see as unachievable and not even bother to attempt. 

kittenkat wrote (see)
But isn't it a viscous cycle, if you learn to overeat you will overeat. People have lost connection with their natural appetites.


Appetite and hunger are actually quite different things. The problem is that people have developed an appetite for energy dense, high fat, high salt, highly palatable, easily accessed 'food'. And they've lost touch with experiencing hunger. If you're interested in the subject, Brian Wansink has written widely on 'Mindless Eating'. It makes for very interesting reading

13/09/2012 at 13:06

Also you can't really knock the official 5-a-day campaign for misinformation.  Any time I've actually read official information about it, nowhere does it state you can stay in perfect health by drinking five glasses of orange juice per day.  I presume there are standards applied to which products are allowed to state "contains one of your 5-a-day"?  I don't think it's the responsibility of each manufacturer to label their processed foods with information like "actually, put this down and buy a cabbage instead."

kittenkat wrote (see)
 

But isn't it a viscous cycle, if you learn to overeat you will overeat. People have lost connection with their natural appetites.

I dunno, I think I've got a pretty healthy diet and I'm currently the leanest I've ever been (mainly thanks to a shit load of exercise) but if I ate according to my appetite and for the pleasure I get from eating food, no expense spared, and it wasn't bad for me, I'm pretty sure I would end up eating at least twice the amount I do at the moment.  Maybe other people find it easier to eat according to their appetite and this keeps them at a healthy weight according to their current lifestyle.  Bully for them! 

13/09/2012 at 13:06
kittenkat wrote (see)
, it can be as simple as taking the stairs, not the lift in work. I'm not talking about huge amounts of exercise I'm talking about wanting to be more active.

.... or not driving to the nearest space to the door at the supermarket? People are lazy by default... that's why they're fat and unfit.

 

13/09/2012 at 13:13
PhilPub wrote (see)

Also you can't really knock the official 5-a-day campaign for misinformation.  Any time I've actually read official information about it, nowhere does it state you can stay in perfect health by drinking five glasses of orange juice per day.  I presume there are standards applied to which products are allowed to state "contains one of your 5-a-day"?  I don't think it's the responsibility of each manufacturer to label their processed foods with information like "actually, put this down and buy a cabbage instead."

The five-a-day campaign specifically states that juice only counts as one portion, and it advises to eat a variety of fruit and veg. It's a pretty good campaign on all accounts. 

As for food manufacturers - they have highjacked the five-a-day message somewhat in their labelling. The refer to it as the 'health halo'. Label a product as containing one of your five f&v portions, and people believe it to be a healthy option. The fact that the portion is from a few raisins in a fat and sugar laden flapjack is another matter... And it's not regulated at all. 

13/09/2012 at 13:14

OK, ignore the word pleasure.  I very, very rarely stop eating because I feel full. I stop eating because there is no food left on the plate.

Buffets at parties are very dangerous territory for me. 

  And I take your point on food labelling, the (mis)information conveyed can be very cheeky.  Not sure what the answer is other than better educating people about the basics, that "low fat" can often mean high sugar content etc., as people have already commented on.

Edited: 13/09/2012 at 13:16
13/09/2012 at 14:36

Yes, the goverment 5 a day message does say that you can only count juice as 1 of your 5 a day but it has been hijacked by food manufacturers and they apply their own standards to it. How many average people are going to look at all the finer points of the campaign and how many are going to just pay attention to the big label that tells them that something is healthy?

It's good that people are encouraged to eat more fruit and vegetables, but there is a huge element of willingly allowing ourselves to be deceived by it. When there are products like fruit loaf, pizza or a sausage & chips in onion gravy ready meal proudly claiming that they "contain 1 of your 5 a day" then something has gone wrong! Fine to eat those things just because you fancy them, but don't pretend you do it because they are "healthy"!

I just had a look on a few supermarket websites about how much fruit/veg makes up 1 of 5 a day and the standard line is "80g of fruit or vegetables is one portion and contributes to one of your five a day"

but the lawyer in me is asking why they have worded it as "contributes to one of your five a day" - probably because the product contains 80g of overprocessed, sugary, salty, pureed pulp that used to be a vegetable in a former life, and that doesn't really count as one portion the way the original campaign intended it!

13/09/2012 at 14:47

I loved the story that Mars have disowned the deep fried mars bar because "deep-frying one of our products would go against our commitment to promoting healthy, active lifestyles"

13/09/2012 at 14:56
kittenkat wrote (see)

I think Mars next TV advert should feature a deep fried bar and several heavily drunk people, I might just come up with a slogan...

A Mars a day gives you something to barf up with your hangover.

Marketing genius me. Who's hiring?

might win them a slice of the donner kebab market.

13/09/2012 at 15:43

Ok this thread looks interesting but I can be arsed reading it.I have serious exercis and stuff to do Jezza Kyles on too

The drive through in our local Mc D's is rammed packed the queue is normally 30 cars long but the car park is empty.LOL people are so lazy they cant be bothered to park and walk into the place.

13/09/2012 at 15:52

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/h3RzinJ-j4nkCfblSi9pJgtbPrF1881aY9gGZu07YiBx0bqrIdEepsDtrzHHKoP48NA9iezgMg9Ilr21zINNkjiv13oSRYf5AM_h1ine9c5Lj1NTRw

13/09/2012 at 16:32

Love the escalator, irony at it's best

13/09/2012 at 16:47
PhilPub wrote (see)
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/h3RzinJ-j4nkCfblSi9pJgtbPrF1881aY9gGZu07YiBx0bqrIdEepsDtrzHHKoP48NA9iezgMg9Ilr21zINNkjiv13oSRYf5AM_h1ine9c5Lj1NTRw

So only people who are able to walk up a steep flight of stairs should be allowed in?

(and the bloke on the escalator is actually walking up it....perhaps he's in a hurry)

13/09/2012 at 17:43

Guys, it's really easy to put on weight. How many of us piled the weight on when we got an injury?

It isn't all people stuffing Maccy Ds into their face.

If you eat one digestive biscuit too much a day over what you have burnt off you will put on a stone in a year. However by the opposite walk 20 minutes every day you will lose a stone over a year.

Gaining weight is often a sloww process such that you or your friends don't really notice until you become a lard arse.

 

13/09/2012 at 17:46
If becoming lardarse doesn't put people off then nothing will
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