#Handsoverhearts at London Marathon

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17/04/2013 at 23:40

Dear Runners of Runner's World,

I just wanted to let you know about a campaign we have started called #Handsoverhearts. The campaign urges runners of this Sunday's London Marathon to cross the finish line with their hands over their hearts in tribute to the tragic events that unfolded in Boston on Monday.

 

Running is a solitary sport, yet as runners we are greater than the sum of our parts, we are a proud community enabling, motivating and supporting one another to achieve greatness. The tragedy that unfolded at The Boston Marathon reminds us of the importance of our community and the love, compassion and camaraderie of runners across the globe.

 

This small personal gesture will act as a mark of respect and a demonstration of a running community united in tragedy. Photographers capture every marathon runner’s finishing moment and we are asking runners to dedicate that moment of personal achievement to those lives whose lives have been irrevocably changed by events at Boston Marathon.

 

Please spread the message and follow on twitter #Handsoverhearts

 

Best Wishes,

 

Lucy Fraser-Macnamara

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1088946/thumbs/a-HANDS-OVER-HEART-640x468.jpg?6

 

18/04/2013 at 09:15

I thought the runners were being asked to take part in 30 seconds silence and wear a black ribbon - although not running, I know in the days when I did run marathons the last thing I was thinking about when I finished was making a gesture of any kind.  Good luck though a nice idea.

seren nos    pirate
18/04/2013 at 09:17

agree grendel .....crossing the line is a very personal thing......

18/04/2013 at 09:24

Why do people try to get folk to all do something?  There was some other poster wanting people to all wear a race medal to work next Monday!

Do they want to feel they've influenced events or something?

I feel that the black ribbons, and a 30 second silence are enough.

18/04/2013 at 09:34

Agreed, crossing the line is a very personal thing, and would have been for all those runners in Boston who didn't make it past the finish line, for those who were injured or lost their lives watching that personal moment.

30 seconds silence and a black ribbon could be seen as an obligatory arrangement by the race organisers, #Handsoverhearts is not. It's a personal gesture made by runners if they choose (and remember) to do so.

We want to get people all to do something to show our solidarity as a running community, our love. compassion and commitment to our sport. A running community united in tragedy.

The #Handsoverheart campaign was also started before any official confirmation of ribbons and silence, it’s a runner's reaction to a very personally affecting tragedy.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Lucy

18/04/2013 at 09:35
Are you going to show people where their heart is before hand ?

Few Yanks seem to know
seren nos    pirate
18/04/2013 at 09:35

i personally think the silence is enough........I am uneasy with mass shows of anything....not sure why but to me grief and remeberance is more of an individual thing.......it seems that others need an obvious outward sign that they are affected by it.........a bit like telling everyone that you give lots of money to charity...

 

18/04/2013 at 09:38
seren nos wrote (see)

agree grendel .....crossing the line is a very personal thing......

 

I agree too. I think if you are doing a race in memory of someone close you probably think of them, otherwise you are wrapped up in your own pain/triumph/disapppointment/relief. 

Both times I've crossed the line my main thought was that I survived and thankfully could stop at last. 

It's a nice idea but solidarity with those in Boston is, quite rightly, for expressing at the start, not the finish.

Edited: 18/04/2013 at 09:39
seren nos    pirate
18/04/2013 at 09:46
Lucy Fraser-Macnamara wrote (see)

 

The #Handsoverheart campaign was also started before any official confirmation of ribbons and silence, it’s a runner's reaction to a very personally affecting tragedy.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Lucy

so peoples reaction should be an individual thing....once everyone starts doing the same thing.they are doing it because someone has told them to do it and they are being made to feel guilty if they do not........
if someone does a gesture because they have been told to do it.to me it just loses all meaning...it loses the emotion and the meaning.......

 

18/04/2013 at 09:46
Lucy Fraser-Macnamara wrote (see)

...

30 seconds silence and a black ribbon could be seen as an obligatory arrangement by the race organisers, #Handsoverhearts is not. It's a personal gesture made by runners if they choose (and remember) to do so.

...

 

How can giving a ribbon to runners be seen as making wearing it obligatory?  Complete nonsense.

Pudge    pirate
18/04/2013 at 09:50
Lucy Fraser-Macnamara wrote (see)

Agreed, crossing the line is a very personal thing, and would have been for all those runners in Boston who didn't make it past the finish line, for those who were injured or lost their lives watching that personal moment.

30 seconds silence and a black ribbon could be seen as an obligatory arrangement by the race organisers, #Handsoverhearts is not. It's a personal gesture made by runners if they choose (and remember) to do so.

We want to get people all to do something to show our solidarity as a running community, our love. compassion and commitment to our sport. A running community united in tragedy.

The #Handsoverheart campaign was also started before any official confirmation of ribbons and silence, it’s a runner's reaction to a very personally affecting tragedy.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Lucy

My personal feeling on this is that your opening sentence sounds like something of a guilt trip.

I'm not sure I 'get' what you are trying to acheive to be honest.

18/04/2013 at 10:10

No guilt trip intended and there is nothing to ‘achieve’ in doing this.

Runners will choose whether or not they make the gesture making it an individual statement but communities and solidarity are about groups of individuals coming together.

I respect everyone’s opinions and only hope that we can as a community show our respects in as many ways as possible, gestures, ribbons and silences.

Best wishes,

Lucy

18/04/2013 at 10:15

I would of thought anyone with a genuine sense of grief over the events of Boston would have already considered making a "gesture" without being corralled into some organised gesture.

Why not do something useful like donate blood say rather than a bleedin heart look at me and my caring ways self aggrandising gesture? Why not just run the race as an act of defiance and cameraderie?

18/04/2013 at 10:27

if you have to tell someone to make a personal gesture, and then tell them when to make it, and what that gesture should be, then it's not a personal gesture at all.

I'm sure your intentions are kind and the sentiment is well meaning, but as with the Kony2012 campaign last year, this type of flashmob organised sympathy comes across as self-aggrandising.

18/04/2013 at 10:38
AgentGinger wrote (see)

if you have to tell someone to make a personal gesture, and then tell them when to make it, and what that gesture should be, then it's not a personal gesture at all.

 

I think that's a little unfair.  The whole point of the gesture is a show of solidarity, which is only going to be recognisable by having many, many people (voluntarily) doing the same thing.  Which is beside the point - there's certainly more choice in something like this than with the officially observed 30 seconds silence.  I'll be observing the silence out of respect for other people's sensibilities. I won't be joining in this campaign (with respect I think it will be the last thing on my mind when I cross the line on Sunday) but I respect other people's choice to do so. 

To the OP - I've got no problem with you publicising this campaign, but I would be careful with any language or approach which may meet accusations of emotional blackmail or cajoling - words like "urge" for example.

Edited: 18/04/2013 at 10:40
18/04/2013 at 10:53

Lucy, can I ask if you are a runner?  You talk about the running community but you have never posted on runners world before?  Are those your words in the original post or have you cut & paste them from somewhere else?

Also the "we" behind this campaign - are they runners?  As a few others have mentioned, at the end of the marathon most people are struggling to remember their names, never mind remembering to perform a symbolic gesture.  I honestly can't tell you what I will do as I cross the line (except for stopping my stopwatch) - in my last marathon I gave a seemingly nonchalant wave as I only had enough energy to raise my hand to just above waist height

I sympathise with the motivation behind this campaign, but the language makes me uneasy and it doesn't seem to understand the challenges of marathon running.  

 

18/04/2013 at 11:36

stutyr - if you google her name, then you will find links to various charity fundraising pages for her showing she is a runner and doing VLM this year

 

 

18/04/2013 at 11:37

Hi,

 

I can confirm I am a runner and will be running on Sunday at The London Marathon. This is not my first marathon or other running event.I am part of a running community/running club in London and also volunteer with a not-for profit charitable organisation who use running to engage young homeless people. The 'we' is runners, runners in our community and the running scheme for young people.

 

I'm sorry if the language doesn't suit all, I'm no communications or marketing expert just a runner speaking passionatly too far way away from an incident to be able to feel like I can physically help (ie giving blood).

 

Best wishes and good luck to all running on Sunday,

 

Lucy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18/04/2013 at 11:47

Whilst I've got sympathy with the OP.... who's heart is clearly in the right place, I am pleased to see that people are prepared to reject the idea - even though it sounds cruel to do so.

I recoil at this sort of thing - for all the reasons that others have expressed.

In recent years, there seems to have been a fashion for emotional inflation, where everyone has to outdo the previous high way that a tragedy has been marked.

For example, I watch football and when a 17yr old fan tragically died (natural causes), and a minute's silence was not considered enough. There was a campaign for everyone to clap throughout the 17th minute of a match.  The club backed it... and announced it at the appropriate time during the match.   It was strange, because after about 10 minutes, people were clock-watching.  And during the minute's applause, it was like the players didn't quite know what to do, as the match continued.  

I know there are differences here, but I think there is a time and a place for remembrance....   and in sport, that place is definitely pre-race / pre-match.  Once the event is underway, it is good for the human soul for people to let off steam, get on with the game and move on with life.

18/04/2013 at 11:51

Well said RW, that's how I see it.

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