Gait analysis, as waste of time?

21 to 40 of 186 messages
19/12/2013 at 09:54

^^ +1 The Grinch ^^

My only addition is that gait analysis should be done outside, rather than on the treadmill as no-one runs with the same technique and stride pattern on a treadmill.

Unless (I guess) you know you will do 100% of your running on a treadmill, then it may make more sense...

19/12/2013 at 14:00

I've had numerous shoes that fit well and feel comfy, yet have given me problems. I've done numerous assessments to ensure my running form is as good as it can be, yet I've still had problems. I've had less problems when getting shoes after gait analysis.

Gait analysis is not totally accurate but I do feel it can be a useful guide, so get frustrated when people make such sweeping generalisations that it's a con.

19/12/2013 at 14:32

Why don't they call it footfall analysis. Since it isn't gait analysis.

19/12/2013 at 20:11

A couple of points have to be made.  

While more research is needed on gait analysis, we at least have to acknowledge that its key advocates in the industry are sincere.  Sweatshop invest an enormous amount of money on training their staff to do gait analysis.  Their full time staff do three courses in Biomechanics at RoehamptonUniversity, with all travel, accommodation and fees paid by the company.  If they manifestly believed that they were selling snake oil, then they would simply train the staff sales techniques in shop for a fraction of the cost. 

I worked for Sweatshop two years ago, so my information might be out of date. 

The 30day return policy allows you to run in a pair of shoes for 30 days, and if they don’t work out in that period, you get to exchange them for a pair of equal value or pay the difference.  I was however instructed to give people their money back if I could not find a shoe that worked, or if I thought it was necessary to insure fairness for the customer. 

Trade price for a pair of running shoes is approximately half or recommended retail price, so a pair that costs £80 at rrp would likely cost Sweatshop £40, and give them a £40mark up.  If a customer returns a pair of shoes under the 30 day return scheme, then they effectively charge the customer £80 and loose two pairs of shoes worth £40.  In other words, the best they can hope for is to break even.  If the shoes were sold at a reduction in the sale, or if the customer comes back for a third pair, then Sweatshop make a loss on the transaction.  It is only fair to say that the 30 day scheme is a pretty strong statement of confidence in their system. 

19/12/2013 at 20:20

It isn't gait analysis. You don't even know what gait analysis is do you Ben? It isn't videoing  a foot dropping on a treadmill. 

19/12/2013 at 20:21

Do you ever read what other people post Ben? Bloody Hell!

19/12/2013 at 20:45
The Grinch wrote (see)

It isn't gait analysis. You don't even know what gait analysis is do you Ben? It isn't videoing  a foot dropping on a treadmill. 

Thank you, I know exactly what gait analysis is. 

I would venture to say much better than you do. 

The fact that you think that what running shops do is not gait analysis, suggests that you perhaps do not understand exactly what they do. 

It is not the foot that you are looking at. 

19/12/2013 at 20:56
The Grinch wrote (see)

Do you ever read what other people post Ben? Bloody Hell!

I read what people write very carefully, but please do not assume that I will find what you write exceptionally profound. 

19/12/2013 at 21:55
Ben, did Sweatshop make you try and sell the orthotic things to every customer?
19/12/2013 at 22:20
Millsy1977 wrote (see)
Ben, did Sweatshop make you try and sell the orthotic things to every customer?

That was coming in as I left. 

It got a bit silly!

 

19/12/2013 at 22:21

I don't want to get into a slanging match but there are some people who are too stupid to see beyond the end of their nose. I guess if you walk round with your fingers in your ears going blah blah you can believe anything.

19/12/2013 at 22:31
The Grinch wrote (see)

I don't want to get into a slanging match but there are some people who are too stupid to see beyond the end of their nose. I guess if you walk round with your fingers in your ears going blah blah you can believe anything.

Your argument being?

19/12/2013 at 23:27

Argument being you don't want to consider the evidence. Makes you pretty useless Ben. Stick your fingers in your ears and go blah blah if you like. You can't persuade people who act plain dumb.

20/12/2013 at 19:00

With that Sweatshop 30 day exchange thing what's the deal?  Life of a shoe? Debatable, I know with surface etc but 400-500 miles is not unreasonably short.  If I run 100-120 mpw can I have free shoes for ever? #justsayin   

21/12/2013 at 00:01
The Grinch wrote (see)

Argument being you don't want to consider the evidence. Makes you pretty useless Ben. Stick your fingers in your ears and go blah blah if you like. You can't persuade people who act plain dumb.

Pray present the evidence then. 

You might want to prepare to get metaphorically beaten, like you stole something from Sweatshop!

24/12/2013 at 15:44

All these shops that offer 'gait analysis' are simply looking to see if you overpronate or not. And sure if enough, if you do they put you in shoes to correct it slightly. However, all this is just entertainment, because there is no evidence to suggest that if you overpronate you are more likely to get injured. This whole nonsense was created by the manufacturers and has been passed down to their dealers and in turn the shop assistants. Don't waste your time with it. Just bu what fits well and is comfortable

24/12/2013 at 18:02
Shoes smell like horse piss wrote (see)

All these shops that offer 'gait analysis' are simply looking to see if you overpronate or not. And sure if enough, if you do they put you in shoes to correct it slightly. However, all this is just entertainment, because there is no evidence to suggest that if you overpronate you are more likely to get injured. This whole nonsense was created by the manufacturers and has been passed down to their dealers and in turn the shop assistants. Don't waste your time with it. Just bu what fits well and is comfortable

 

With all due respect, there is a mountain of published evidence that overpronation causes running injuries. 

This is something that even people who are sceptical about gait analysis usually don’t dispute. 

24/12/2013 at 19:20
Nope
24/12/2013 at 20:16

Only decent research I have seen says pronation does NOT cause injuries.

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2013/06/12/bjsports-2013-092202.abstract

The above survey had a sample size of 924.  Not your usual three men and a dog in most running related studies...

the bmj bit stands for British Medical Journal.

Edited: 24/12/2013 at 20:20
24/12/2013 at 20:30
Surrey Runner wrote (see)

Only decent research I have seen says pronation does NOT cause injuries.

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2013/06/12/bjsports-2013-092202.abstract

The above survey had a sample size of 924.  Not your usual three men and a dog in most running related studies...

the bmj bit stands for British Medical Journal.

So what objections do you have to the studies that indicate that overpronation does cause running injuries?  You can't simply cherry pick studies that suport one position and ignore the ones that do not. 

Tweed JL, Campbell JA, Avil SJ (2008). "Biomechanical risk factors in the development of medial tibial stress syndrome in distance runners". J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 98 (6): 436–44

Hintermann B, Nigg BM (September 1998). "Pronation in runners. Implications for injuries". Sports Med 26 (3): 169–76

Arendse RE (2004). "A biomechanical basis for the prescription of orthoses in the treatment of common
running injuries". Med. Hypotheses 62 (1): 119–20

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