Gait analysis, as waste of time?

101 to 120 of 210 messages
28/12/2013 at 12:25

Incidentally, even if somebody produced a study that disproved gait analysis to the extent that it was not worth investigating the matter any further, I would still reject in the strongest terms the idea that giving somebody a shoe that fitted and felt comfortable constituted good customer service.  

My experience has been that any information that you can get about a customer, improves your chances of not getting a return. 

28/12/2013 at 12:37
Bringing the argument back round again. shops provide pronation analysis not gait analysis.
28/12/2013 at 14:48

If a pair of shoes did not fit well and were uncomfortable, I would try on another pair of shoes instead. I would look for a pair that fit well and were comfortable and the colour, style is what I am looking for in a pair of shoes.

Minimalist/light trainers/Neutral shoes are usually more comfortable than a pair of stiff, uneven, uncomfortable, tight fitting stability shoes. I am the consumer and I am king. I will only ever buy the pair of shoes that I want, not the shoes the 18 or 19 year old sales assistant is trying to sell me. I can always buy shoes online for a much cheaper price point than I would get in a retail store and get the shoe in the colour, style that I want.

Gait analysis is just another means of trying to sell shoes to consumers with fancy running shoe company sales talk. There is no real evidence to prove gait analysis actually works. 

Edited: 28/12/2013 at 14:57
28/12/2013 at 16:27

http://cdn.conversiondiary.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/cartoon-internet.jpg

 

28/12/2013 at 19:24

16 27 is a bit early for bed....

28/12/2013 at 19:34

 "I would still reject in the strongest terms the idea that giving somebody a shoe that fitted and felt comfortable constituted good customer service.  "

That has to be a classic.  Isn't that the primary job of any shoe salesman? 

Are you a foot warrior from hitch hikers's guide to the galaxy?

28/12/2013 at 19:42
RoadWarrior wrote (see)

If a pair of shoes did not fit well and were uncomfortable, I would try on another pair of shoes instead. I would look for a pair that fit well and were comfortable and the colour, style is what I am looking for in a pair of shoes.

Minimalist/light trainers/Neutral shoes are usually more comfortable than a pair of stiff, uneven, uncomfortable, tight fitting stability shoes. I am the consumer and I am king. I will only ever buy the pair of shoes that I want, not the shoes the 18 or 19 year old sales assistant is trying to sell me. I can always buy shoes online for a much cheaper price point than I would get in a retail store and get the shoe in the colour, style that I want.

Gait analysis is just another means of trying to sell shoes to consumers with fancy running shoe company sales talk. There is no real evidence to prove gait analysis actually works. 

Firstly, there is a huge difference between the evidence being conflicted on whether something works, and there being no evidence that it works.

Secondly, if you want me as the retailer to sign a piece of paper saying that you can run in the shoes for 30 days and bring them back covered in horse sh1t if you don't get on with them, then you have to submit yourself to whatever system of testing I think is appropriate.

28/12/2013 at 19:44
Surrey Runner wrote (see)

 "I would still reject in the strongest terms the idea that giving somebody a shoe that fitted and felt comfortable constituted good customer service.  "

That has to be a classic.  Isn't that the primary job of any shoe salesman? 

Are you a foot warrior from hitch hikers's guide to the galaxy?

No. 

If you go to a specialist retailer you expect them to do more than that to constrain your needs. 

Otherwise what is the point of them?

29/12/2013 at 03:58

You go to a running store to buy a shoe (as opposed to online) so you get one that fits right - that's vital.

The gait analysis bit is an added placebo effect to make believe you have been sold the best shoe for your running style.

That bit is important so that when you then inevitably go out and overdo it and get some sort of pain/injury, you don’t then immediately blame the shoe.

29/12/2013 at 05:42

There is nothing wrong with trying shoes on in store to find a shoe that is the right fit and then deciding the shoe is not what you want. You go home and buy that shoe in the colour that you want for a cheaper price online. 

29/12/2013 at 09:30
Nice RoadW and we wonder why our high street is in decline
29/12/2013 at 12:24
RoadWarrior wrote (see)

There is nothing wrong with trying shoes on in store to find a shoe that is the right fit and then deciding the shoe is not what you want. You go home and buy that shoe in the colour that you want for a cheaper price online. 

You would have been welcome to com into my shop and try on every pair of shoes that I had, and go away and buy them online, provided you didn’t make use of my time or expertise. 

The sole commodity I was trading on, was my ability to make a better pick than you. 

29/12/2013 at 13:50

I have never returned a pair of shoes. I make sure that the shoes I want are the correct size, are comfortable and are the brand and model  I am looking for at a reasonable price within my budget. 

If I spent time trying on more than one pair of shoes, say two or three I would more than likely buy the pair that I liked within my budget on special from the running store. I just do not like it when the sales assistants try and pressure me into buying the more expensive shoes in a brand or model that I do not want. 

A loose or tight fitting shoe that does not fit the whole foot will feel uncomfortable and lead to cramping if tight or heel slippage/rolled ankle if loose fit. Too much cushioning in a shoe may lead to the foot rolling inwards. Firm stiff stability/motion control shoe forces the foot to roll out instead of naturally rolling in. Running shoes are working against the natural foot bio-mechanics. Would it be better to work with the natural bio-mechanics than against it and wear a running shoe that works with your natural bio-mechanics instead of trying to correct your natural foot motion?

 

Edited: 29/12/2013 at 13:59
29/12/2013 at 14:23

It very much depends upon the customer, and the number and severity of problems they have.  The less problems there were the more your approach would be correct.  If you get somebody who is a chronic overpronator who is painful to watch, or has chronic plantafashiitis then you are going to have to take a more interventionist approach,at least for now. 

29/12/2013 at 16:02

In my experience, those who go to running shops looking for 'guidance' and 'gait analysis' are the runners with dreadful running technique and no knowledge of the subject matter at all. They also buy into the idea that it's all about the shoes. 'Wrong' shoes are the sole cause of injuries and 'correct' shoes are the only fix.

If every time I walked through a doorway and I banged my head against the side, the answer isn't to wear a special helmet to protect me, it's to learn to walk through the doorway better.

 

29/12/2013 at 16:22

Trying to change somebody’s running style, is a high risk strategy, because the very act of changing it brings a high risk of injury.    When it goes wrong, it goes wrong big time, and it is not something that should be undertaken lightly. Using shoe type to correct a problem is gentle and unobtrusive by comparison. 

Edited: 29/12/2013 at 16:25
29/12/2013 at 16:33

What happens when the running style changes ben? 

Say I went into a shop with serious 'over bullshit pronation' and you sold me some shoes that fitted. 3/4 months down the line I've been doing some strength work in the gym as part of my marathons routine.

now those shoes are, in all truth Useless.

Why not sell them some neutral shoes and advise strength work.

surely that's the better way to sell a shoe to someone in the long run.

29/12/2013 at 16:35
Poor running form is a higher risk
29/12/2013 at 16:38

Also as they have a serious condition like PF I wouldn't advise running at all until it's sorted. But that's another matter

When you saw they had a serious over pronation. Which in your words was painful to watch why not teach them to run properly, running is realistically the most natural thing to a human.

29/12/2013 at 16:51
Shoes smell like horse piss wrote (see)
Poor running form is a higher risk

No it isn’t. 

There is better data to suggest that artificially changing your running style causes injuries, than there is to suggest that one style is better than another. 

Running injuries are generally not very serious and generally don’t put you out of action for very long.  It is when you start messing around with somebody’s running style that you start to see people getting ruined for a substantial amount of time. 

Even by teaching somebody a running style that is correct or better than their existing style you might end up doing them harm. 

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