Gait analysis, as waste of time?

1 to 20 of 186 messages
18/12/2013 at 12:52

As title, never bothered with it myself and can't see the point.

18/12/2013 at 12:55

a waste of time (fat fingers)

18/12/2013 at 13:03

It's a great sales gimmick.

 

18/12/2013 at 13:36

Might be good for examining and improving your running style. None of us see what everyone else does. 

18/12/2013 at 13:38

Not to be confused with the nonsense they do in shops to sell you shoes

18/12/2013 at 15:46

Useful for some, useless for others.

18/12/2013 at 16:39

I would like a £1 for every time someone is told they 'over pronate'

 

18/12/2013 at 16:42

I'm not saying it's the be-all and end-all, but what is a better way of getting the correct shoes then?

18/12/2013 at 16:47

I asked some Adidas employees and apparently my feet are suited to Adidas, who would have thought .......

All employees are out to sell you the shoes which give them the biggest commission. 

 

18/12/2013 at 16:50

How about, useless for all and perceived to be useful by some. 

Best way to get shoes is having the right fit and they feel nice. Don't get barefoot(rip off) don't go for the super motion controlled shoes(too heavy) Go for a nice comfy neutral shoe, quite light and a sole that isn't too stiff. 

18/12/2013 at 17:06
Get your running form sorted and there will be no need for it.
Rather than address the root cause of the problem shops like to flog you stuff that just treats the symptoms and keep you coming back every 6 months.
18/12/2013 at 19:07

It was useful for me. Showed me where I was putting a lot of stress through my right inside knee, and some restricted movement in my right hamstring / lower back which I went on to 'fix'. Also got a recommendation on a shoe (not that the place sold trainers)

Not really bothered with them in shops. I did get one in an Asics store once and the shoes being recommended were a bizarre selection.

18/12/2013 at 19:13

As I tried to say earlier. The difference from a real gait analysis and what they do in a shop is vast. One is a useful tool to fix a biomechanical problem and one is a marketing tool. 

18/12/2013 at 22:14

Your best chance of getting satisfactory results as a novice runner, is to go to a shop that offers gait analysis, combined with a 30 day returns policy. 

If people pick a shoe without the proper advice, then some will get away with it, and others will find that they have spent £80 on a completely unusable shoe.  Any shoe is expensive if it doesn’t work, and you end up having to go back and get another pair.  A lot of people learn this the hard way. 

The fact that shops offering a 30 day return policy are still in business, means that they must get it right far more often than they do not.  If they get it wrong they will typically make a loss on the sale, but your backside will be covered. 

It is that simple. 

18/12/2013 at 22:55

Have you not been listening Ben. Gait analysis is neither here nor there. A 30 day returns policy is worth something and gait analysis is a con. Novice runner or a pro you still want a good shoe and not be duped. If any shoe, correctly fitted is okay then as long as the size is right there would be no need to return a shoe.

More simple than YOU think.

18/12/2013 at 23:30
The Grinch wrote (see)

Have you not been listening Ben. Gait analysis is neither here nor there. A 30 day returns policy is worth something and gait analysis is a con. Novice runner or a pro you still want a good shoe and not be duped. If any shoe, correctly fitted is okay then as long as the size is right there would be no need to return a shoe.

More simple than YOU think.

I can assure you that it is not that simple.

There are plenty of runners who buy shoes that fit correctly, that go on to have problems with them.

If you think it is just a matter of finding a shoe that fits correctly, then you are sorely mistaken.

It is not that I have not been listening to your comments about gait analysis being a con, it is more that I don't agree with them.

Even if it is, you sure as hell won't find a shop that will offer a 30 day return policy without giving you a gait analysis.

19/12/2013 at 01:01

I'd say it helped me.  I could see a problem on the video.  A twisting motion in the shin that's vulnerable to shin splints.  I could see that the twisting disappeared with mildly supporting shoes.... and apparently that twisting is accommodated somewhere in my body that's a little more robust, because I'm pretty much injury free.

Of course, I can't be certain that I couldn't have picked up any old pair of comfy shoes and been trouble free.... because I haven't done a scientific test with dozens of shoes.  But I certainly believe there's value in it.

I fully accept the anecdotal evidence that it isn't for everyone though.

19/12/2013 at 09:27

If the 30 day returns policy is The Sweatshop one then it isn't dependant on a gait analysis. It is a very generous policy and goes far beyond basic consumer rights. The strategy would be that the policy will attract more people to buy from there against the people who are going to take stuff back. Same strategy that has worked at M&S for years. 

19/12/2013 at 09:31

There's often some confusion about the Sweatshop 30 day policy. It is a 30 exchange and not a 30 day money back policy. Still a good deal though.

19/12/2013 at 09:39

I need to stop saying gait analysis is a con. It isn't. The thing they do in shops, that they call gait analysis, is. Look up gait analysis on wikipedia and it's far removed from what you see in a running shop.

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