Gait assessment?

It is worth having a gait assessment done before buying new shoes?

1 to 20 of 39 messages
16/02/2014 at 14:26

Hello - me again asking what is probably a daft question, however I am confused;

I am training for a half marathon at the end of March and have been wearing Nike Free's 5, with the flyknit upper.  I find them comfortable and I'm injury free as I stretch and roller my legs every day.

I will need a new pair of shoes soon and someone told me that I should go to a running shop for an assessment of my running style - I've had a look at what various people think of this and the Nikes and I am more confused than when I started.

So, if you were me would you a. stick with the shoes that seem to be fine (although are they suitable for a HM?) or b. go and have an assessment at the risk of being flogged some over engineered shoes? or c. do something more useful than keep thinking about shoes?

I know you guys will help clarify things in my poor befuddled brain.

Thanks

16/02/2014 at 14:30

Stick with them if you have no issues with them. Do the half then reasses what your targets are and then worry about your shoes.

16/02/2014 at 15:13

If it ain't broke... Period.

16/02/2014 at 20:39

Gait Assesment in running shops isn't what it seems. it's merely to identify if you overpronate or not by videoing your running up to knee height from behind.

What you need to know is that there is no evidence whatsoever to suggest that runners who overpronate have an increased risk of injury or that wearing prescribed 'correcting' shoes  lowers your risk.

If you existing shoes are comfy and you have no problems then that is absolutely ideal!

XX1
16/02/2014 at 20:51

I'd suggest option a.

XX1
PSC    pirate
16/02/2014 at 21:23

Nike Free 5s are perfect for the distance.  If you were having issues then maybe a gait analysis would be one approach to take to find a solution, but you aren't so crack on with the nikes.

(I'm another Nike Free wearer and love them - current pair have over 400 miles on them)!

16/02/2014 at 21:24

Gait analysis is an essential tool of the running retailer, but if you are running in the shoes and not having any problems, then you already have your answer. 

When I worked in a shop providing gait analysis, I always placed a higher weighting on what had worked for the customer previously, than the results of the gait analysis. 

16/02/2014 at 21:44

QED. Gait analysis is rubbish.

16/02/2014 at 21:50

It is not Mr Puffy.  

If you worked in a shop with a 30 day returns poilicy, and were held responsible for the accuracy of your advice, then you would learn to like it. 

It is not a magic bulet however. 

It is just one of a number of tools, that can help constrain a persons needs. 

16/02/2014 at 22:10

Read what you wrote Ben!

"I always placed a higher weighting on what had worked for the customer previously, than the results of the gait analysis. "

So despite all the years (it is years isn't it?) of study and training in the anatomy of the human foot, you chuck it all out of the window if a customer says he quite likes Asics?

 

 

16/02/2014 at 22:27
Ben- you lost your last debate on this so You should wind your neck in or you will end up floundering like a headless chicken again. I won't even bother correcting you this time because you'll probably forget once you blink.

R1cksy and PSC- I am intrigued by the nike frees and am wondering what they are like for forefoot cushion? I run in their illegitimate siblings (skechers fathered by the same designer) and would love to try the frees if they are wide and cushioned enough.
Edited: 16/02/2014 at 22:28
16/02/2014 at 22:30
Flob, I used a pair over the summer and got nearly 800 miles out of them before the cushioning in the forefoot started to go. They were good in the dry but not very grippy in the wet. If I can find a cheap pair I may get some more for this summer.
16/02/2014 at 22:39

Flob

Does it ever occur to you that I might tire of spending my weekends as an unpaid spokesman for Sweatshop, who I found to be neither kind nor competent?

The bottom line however, is that the “gait analysis deniers” are giving out some bad advice at the moment.  They are just one of many groups, who offer up a simple solution to a complex problem, which wont work for many. 

This is a necessary tool for the retailer. 

16/02/2014 at 22:42
Mr Puffy wrote (see)

Read what you wrote Ben!

"I always placed a higher weighting on what had worked for the customer previously, than the results of the gait analysis. "

So despite all the years (it is years isn't it?) of study and training in the anatomy of the human foot, you chuck it all out of the window if a customer says he quite likes Asics?

 

 

No Mr P

I chucked it out of the window, if he had ran in a 21 series Asics for seven years,and never had a problem. 

Sensible enough?

 

16/02/2014 at 22:49

OK Ben I was being sarcastic, sorry, but the point remains, personal experience trumps gait analysis.

and if a runner has "problems" they need to see someone more qualified and experienced than - your own words again - a retailer.

 

17/02/2014 at 01:47
Ben- the only person who is not telling consumers lies when advising on shoe purchases is the retailer who claims to not know which shoes suit the customer, because the science does not back up any of the retailers claims about different footfall patterns dictating choice of shoe types.
17/02/2014 at 07:19

 

http://s4.runnersworld.co.uk/members/images/493151/gallery/dsc_0424.png?width=350

 

Just think how fast this guy could have run if he'd had that modern running disease, 'over pronation', fixed by correct shoes, via a 'gait analysis'.

I'm sure he would be able to make some 'comment' on that suggestion (if you know whose foot it is).

 

Edited: 17/02/2014 at 07:38
17/02/2014 at 07:57

Gosh!  Thank you all for your advice - sorry to have stirred up what appears to be an old hornets nest.  @Flob - I find the cushioning and width fine;  the 5's more so than the lower numbers though, and also the softness and snuggness of the flyknit preferable to ordinary lace - ups.  

17/02/2014 at 09:02
17/02/2014 at 13:42

 In store gait analysis based on arch height  or static foot test conducted  by a young store employee with little experience and no qualifications would not be an accurate assessment. I buy my running shoes  based on colour, style, comfort, low heel drop and light weight shoes.

Edited: 17/02/2014 at 13:44
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