Stability vs motion control

Have I got the right shoes?

21 to 24 of 24 messages
30/01/2014 at 22:26

The terms “stability” and “motion control” are both basically marketing jargon. 

What it means in practice, is that they are putting a slightly denser material under your arch, to stop it rolling inwards. 

Motion control is a term used for shoes that offer heavier support, for more serious pronators. 

Nobody in the industry would be able to give you a clear explanation of when a shoe ceases to be a “stability shoe”, and becomes a “motion control” shoe. 

Indeed, there would be no consistency between two brands, regarding these two terms.   

Your best bet is to try the shoes out for the 30 day trial period, and see how they fare!

01/02/2014 at 08:00

Stability and motion control shoes usually contain medial posts a dense material on medial side of mid sole or firm heel. A running shoe without medial post in mid sole or heel is regarded as a neutral trainer.

A runner's foot position starts in neutral position in a neutral shoe. In a stability or motion control shoe the foot starting position is placed in a under pronating position. Running shoes are based on the concept that neutral position is good and that inward roll of ankle over pronation must be corrected or prevented by adjusting foot position.

Over pronation is questionably argued that it leads to more injuries than neutral pronation. Over pronation may not need to be corrected and using neutral trainers may not be as detrimental as claimed by shoe companies, podiatrists and sales assistants.

The running store sales assistant assesses gait by my standing position and walking across the shop floor. Bombarded with technical sales terms to make them sound like they know what they are talking about and try and scare me that I will become injured if I do not buy the expensive shoes.

Edited: 01/02/2014 at 11:20
01/02/2014 at 21:02

When I worked at Sweatshop, I encouraged new members of staff not to read what the manufacturers said about their shoes, because it could be more misleading than informative. 

It was much more constructive to teach them about shoe design, and the materials used in shoe construction, from an outside viewpoint. 

We always withheld out opinions about a shoes characteristics, until we had seen video footage of a significant number of people running in it. 

Many shoes that went into the 30 day return box got cut apart, to find out exactly how they were made!

01/02/2014 at 22:40

It's worth noting that MC shoes have a straighter last than 'support' shoes - it's not just the size/density of the medial post.  I have a pair of NB1012 from when I had knee surgery and when looking at them from underneath, they have almost no curve to them at all.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&docid=wEO1aQwYM3lLSM&tbnid=PqVILVqXY7ROqM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fffden-2.phys.uaf.edu%2F211_spring2009.web%2FJoseph_DeWilde%2Fanatomyofashoe.html&ei=snftUqjSJar8ygOc-IGQCg&bvm=bv.60444564,d.bGE&psig=AFQjCNFPRd4lZZqV9-YxunpbAHqgoZpRRw&ust=1391380786297250

 


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