Dealing with dog owners

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06/11/2012 at 16:50
Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

Not wasting any more of my time on this - the rest of you are welcome to argue till kingdom come. Which according to prediction, isn't far off.

 

Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

Caveat - I do engage my dogs in staring but that's because I'm their Alpha and they know it.

 

Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

my OH and I are Alpha male and female,

 

Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

Can't be bothered with you.

You're an intriguing character aren't you! Kind of flit between self importance, and overly sensitive!

I want to read more from you!

06/11/2012 at 16:57

Possibly barking

06/11/2012 at 17:35

This is all very interesting. I've never had trouble with dogs while out running. In fact, because I like dogs I spend half my time saying 'hello boy/girl' to them trying to attract their attention and failing. What am I doing wrong. I'm not a dog owner by the way. I'm a bit different when out with my kids - dogs, playful or not, can be extremely frightening to them, so we are very circumspect. It's all a question of balance and, as someone said, it's mainly exceptions that give dog owners a bad name.

06/11/2012 at 18:08

A running mate of mine was really scared of dogs and the dogs knew it. They could smell the fear. Didn't matter if he was leading or following, the dogs just went after him, never me. Dave I said. Just pretend they don't exist and you'll be fine. 

So the next occasion we met a dog he tried. I mean he really did. The Welsh springer spaniel didn't even notice we were there anyway. But following, I could see my mate visibly relax once he was sure he was clear of danger.

On an impulse I rushed up behind him barking like a rabid Rottweiler. I tell you, he damn near shat himself.

Fun and games.

08/11/2012 at 18:41

Sideburn, thanks for the tip, I’ll look up the Dog Whisperer. I’m never going to be a dog lover, but hope to get to the point where I can relax enough that otherwise well-behaved dogs such as yours don’t really notice me. I’ve been told that they can tell when you are scared, and may act badly, but it’s so hard to stop the involuntary fear responses.

I do tend to walk past dogs, but have had a few growl when I’ve slowed down near them. Maybe the tip about not looking at them in the eye will help. I also sometimes stand still, but usually frozen to the floor in panic, rather than choosing to stop.

 Runs with dogs, I can totally see your point here:

“It's a real shame that these people have had bad experiences with a dog, but IMHO just because they are scared of dogs that does not give them the right to expect or require every dog & dog owner they come into contact with to act in the way that they want them to.”

 All I expect is for the owner to prevent the dog jumping up at me, or injuring me in any way (although I do appreciate it when an owner does more than this, such as telling the dog to sit, and always thank them). The dog owners/lovers on this thread clearly sound responsible and considerate.

 I also fully accept that my involuntary twitches, squeaks etc may be part of the problem (although they only generally happen if a dog off the lead runs towards me, I’m generally not bothered by a calm dog on a lead). I know that dogs need the freedom to run, and I feel very sorry for some city dogs that are obviously cooped up in a small space all day.

 My problem is I can’t control these reactions. I’d love to learn how to, but don’t really know where to start.  I’ve tried to search for dog classes, but only get ones on how to train your dog. I considered hypnotherapy, but think it would be better to get used to read dogs in a space which felt safe to me.

08/11/2012 at 21:19

I have I would say a healthy respect for dogs when out running. I've been bitten twice once by an Alsatian while running for a bus, the second time it was a Jack Russell in a park. I now slow to a walk if I see a loose dog running vaguely unsupervised in my direction.

I don't think it's unreasonable that dog owners should make sure that they only let their dog off the lead if they are paying attention to where the dog is at all times and the dog is well trained enough that it will return immediately when called. If not then keep the dog on a lead. It is never acceptable to get bitten by someone's dog, the owner may get playful bites from the dog themselves and not see what the big deal is but to a stranger that could be a deeply traumatic experience.

 

08/11/2012 at 21:52
Gina, you're dead right. I know some folk who play wrestle with their dogs and don't mind being left covered in nips and scratches. I just think that's totally irresponsible as the dog is being taught that's okay behaviour and may do it to someone else...

My dog is maybe not perfectly trained in the 'sit, stay, come' sense, but he has very good manners if that's not a silly way to describe a dog. He knows not to jump up, not to bark at people and absolutely never EVER to help himself to food that's sitting around. I thought the food thing was hugely important cause he's the perfect snatching height where sandwich waving toddlers are concerned.

Jane, do you not have any friends with dogs that you could 'practice' with? You might get on better with befriending one particular (small, quiet) dog to start with rather than trying to feel better about all dogs all at once. I mean, I love dogs and I'm rarely intimidated by them but I'm still wary of big 'packs' and one or two breeds whose nasty side I've seen before - I'm not particularly keen on Alsatians or Rottweilers for example.

If you were anywhere near me I'd love to let you get to know my little mutt. He's very non-threatening. I'm in Glasgow by the way, just in case...
08/11/2012 at 21:57

There are dog owners who always rank their dogs status above anything and everybody else. For them, their dog can do no wrong. Even if it runs over to you, jumps up and bites you on the face. Its still your fault, never the dogs, never theirs the dogs owner.

Some of the places I run are very remote. And should something of this nature occur to me while minding my own business.

And if I think I can get away with it......

 

08/11/2012 at 22:05

I'm in Manchester, but thanks for the offer

I don't have any friends close by who have dogs. A problem with living in the city centre I guess. A friend of a friend helped a lot on a camping trip this summer - the dog was massive and I was terrified at first, but they held him whilst I stroked him, and it wasn't too bad (the beer before hand helped me give it a go!). By the end of the day I could even throw a frisbee for him.

If I could find a course which covered this kind of sensitisation and something about doggy behaviour that would be ideal. I'll keep searching.

My 3 year old nephew had a sandwich pinched once. It happened so quickly we barely knew what had happened.

 

 

09/11/2012 at 08:52

Yesterday morning just finishing my run and going the last 100 yards to my house, out of a door come 3 whippets snapping and snarling (no eye contact needed to make them think I might be aggressive!), I turned and faced them and to be honest not particularly bothered because if I wanted to could have quite easily kicked the sh1t out of them, but what if it had been a young child.  Dog owner came out and said oh I am so sorry, I thanked her for her kindness

09/11/2012 at 09:15

I tend to pick routes that stay away from dog walkers. I give them a wide berth because some owners don't have control over their dogs so I don't want to get tangled up in the lead and trip over. I'm fortunate that most of the dog walkers I encounter are pretty considerate. Ocassionally certain breeds will snap but having had dogs as pets my whole life I know that they usually just feel threatened so I'll just get pissed off for a moment, swear, then get over it.

I think shouting "FUCK!" is a good way to vent as it is more of an annoyance at the situation and not a direct attack at the dog or it's owner. I don't want to waste time discussing their incompetence, I'm trying to get a good run in.

09/11/2012 at 19:36
lardarse wrote (see)
kittenkat wrote (see)
 

 Unfortunately it's not the dog's fault, you are right it's the owners. But so many people take on a dog with no idea or inclination to train it properly.

 

Strangely Brown wrote (see)

Really can't advocate abusing the animal in any way, they are just doing what comes naturally, it's the onwers who are 100% at fault.

Some dog owners are just damned inconsiderate, unfortunately.

At what point does it become an animals fault? That it's a dogs natural begaviour to attack and kill other animals it deems weaker isn't a very good excuse for their behaviour. It's not the owners fault that dogs are genetically encoded to kill. Yes some owners exacerbate the problem, but the fact remains that dogs are cold blooded killers.

No one would put up with a human behaving like a dog, they'd be fined, jailed and in some countries exterminated.

 

 

 

I love dogs! lmfao

At what point does it become the dog's fault you ask?

Why do you want to make it the dogs fault?  Do you want to lock it up for 6 months?  Make it do some community service?  Bit of litter collecting or painting your park fence?  Do you want to sue that little guy out of every fluffy toy and tennis balls he owns?

Dogs. when trained right, handled right and under the command of an owner who knows what he is doing is a respectful,  obediant and calm companion.  Errant dogs are a result of terrible ownership on 99.9% of occaisions (a lot like terrible humans are).  So if a dog runs at you, jumps at you or chases you, he's doing it usually because it's fun.  He isn't trying to harm you.  Human's are not prey for dogs.  A properly trained and controlled dog will not chase you.  An improperly controled one, will.  So of course the responsibility is with the owner, he is the master and the superior intellect.  It's he who teached the animal the rules, the dog is designed to follow them.  I'm not sure what it says about you that you want to blame the pet and not the owner, it seems peculiar to me.

Do you think this way about humans too?  If a child was to hit you, would you blame the child and not the parenting?  If a Spaniard happened to punch you ona  night out, would you form ridiculous prejuduces against all Spaniards based on one experience?

Dogs might be cold blooded killers but not of humans.  They love us, most do not want to harm us.  I don't know the stats but i'd be very confident in saying that fewer humans die at the hands of a dogs on a pro-rata basis than they do at the hands of their fellow humans. 

It's humans that hate humans, not dogs, unfortunately.

09/11/2012 at 20:08
Strangely Brown wrote (see)
lardarse wrote (see)
kittenkat wrote (see)
 

 Unfortunately it's not the dog's fault, you are right it's the owners. But so many people take on a dog with no idea or inclination to train it properly.

 

Strangely Brown wrote (see)

Really can't advocate abusing the animal in any way, they are just doing what comes naturally, it's the onwers who are 100% at fault.

Some dog owners are just damned inconsiderate, unfortunately.

At what point does it become an animals fault? That it's a dogs natural begaviour to attack and kill other animals it deems weaker isn't a very good excuse for their behaviour. It's not the owners fault that dogs are genetically encoded to kill. Yes some owners exacerbate the problem, but the fact remains that dogs are cold blooded killers.

No one would put up with a human behaving like a dog, they'd be fined, jailed and in some countries exterminated.

 

 

 

I love dogs! lmfao

At what point does it become the dog's fault you ask?

Why do you want to make it the dogs fault?  Do you want to lock it up for 6 months?  Make it do some community service?  Bit of litter collecting or painting your park fence?  Do you want to sue that little guy out of every fluffy toy and tennis balls he owns?

Dogs. when trained right, handled right and under the command of an owner who knows what he is doing is a respectful,  obediant and calm companion.  Errant dogs are a result of terrible ownership on 99.9% of occaisions (a lot like terrible humans are).  So if a dog runs at you, jumps at you or chases you, he's doing it usually because it's fun.  He isn't trying to harm you.  Human's are not prey for dogs.  A properly trained and controlled dog will not chase you.  An improperly controled one, will.  So of course the responsibility is with the owner, he is the master and the superior intellect.  It's he who teached the animal the rules, the dog is designed to follow them.  I'm not sure what it says about you that you want to blame the pet and not the owner, it seems peculiar to me.

Do you think this way about humans too?  If a child was to hit you, would you blame the child and not the parenting?  If a Spaniard happened to punch you ona  night out, would you form ridiculous prejuduces against all Spaniards based on one experience?

Dogs might be cold blooded killers but not of humans.  They love us, most do not want to harm us.  I don't know the stats but i'd be very confident in saying that fewer humans die at the hands of a dogs on a pro-rata basis than they do at the hands of their fellow humans. 

It's humans that hate humans, not dogs, unfortunately.

 

Edited: 09/11/2012 at 20:09
09/11/2012 at 20:14

Damned if I can read anything previous suggesting why anyone would want to make it the fault of the dog. 

Maybe you should try reading the comments properly before em-barking on your emotional luv in with your fellow s..t machines.

As you no doubt know, treat a dog like a human and it will treat you like a dog.

That's why the f...g things show no respect to humans. It thinks we're just another dog.

Go do what they do. And don't forget to brush your teeth.

09/11/2012 at 20:41

Hi RicF,

    It's right there in the quoted post.  I'm happy with my reading skills, thanks mate.

    Unfortunately the rest of your post doesn't really make any sense so i've no idea how to respond to it.  Sorry.

09/11/2012 at 22:13

No idea how to respond to a post! 

I assumed you'rd just cock your leg and piss up it.

woof!

10/11/2012 at 07:15

  Made me chuckle.

Just to clear up any misunderstanding though, it's perfectly possible to like things without actually being them.  For example, you might like chicken but it doesn't necessarily make you a cock.

10/11/2012 at 11:13
Colin McLaughlin wrote (see)

The original poster was "spinning round in flipping circles trying to face them and be playful with them". He would have done better to stop moving entirely and simply stand still. By moving, he was exciting the dogs. He reacts so they react.

Test it before you dismiss it, please. It's worked for me every time, over the last 30 years. You just stand completely still and the dog loses interest. Very very simple.

 


I was standing perfectly still for a good several seconds the moment I saw it charging from over 100 meters away.  It didn't lose interest, in fact it was trying to get behind me to nip the back of my legs.  Otherwise, I'd say the ones that lose interest are probably not so much of a threat anyway.  

Another 2 dogs gave me grief a couple of minutes later...these were even on a long lead but the owner couldn't hold them back even though I gave them a very wide birth!

Every situation is different and my reaction is different each time.  The only thing I need to change is making it clear to the owners that I'm unimpressed with their lack of control.  Problem with that is, after catching up with the responses here it seems half the dominant leaders are the dogs!  Maybe I need to learn doggie language!   ...GRRRRHHHHHH....that will teach them!


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