Dealing with dog owners

1 to 20 of 95 messages
04/11/2012 at 17:36

Today, 5.5 mile slow run around the Common and 3 aggressive dogs to deal with.

So whilst I'm spinning round in flipping circles trying to face them and be playful with them, the owners do nothing!  And to top it off, when I pass the owner they say something like "sorry...she's just a bit excited".  And my response is something along the lines of "no worries", when really I feel (1) fortunate to have escaped being bitten, (2) after its sinked in...rather annoyed with the owner because it really isn't okay!!  What is a good approach to handling these stupid owners?

Cheers,

Paul

04/11/2012 at 17:40
Turn the rage on when it happens or do nothing until several hours later when yo can do even more nothing. You could boot the dog as you go by.
04/11/2012 at 17:47

I normally just shout something like 'can you get your dog under control please'

04/11/2012 at 17:57

I'd rather boot the owner rather than the dog!  But yes, I need to be a bit more prepared for it and engage the owner.  Sometimes I've seen the same aggressive dog / owner more than once I will sure sort them out next time  Cheers

04/11/2012 at 18:10
My mate was walking his dog in the woods and a runner pulled out an extendable whip and hit the dog with it. Where can I get one.
04/11/2012 at 18:12

Kittenkat...thank you, you are perfectly right.  I know "no worries" shouldn't be my response.  That response was mostly due to the relief of not being bitten!

I think I read dog language very well as have spent my life around dogs. In fact I find when I run around villages dogs are always very friendly, even very excited and playful, and I love those types of dogs.  I trust them.

But these aggressive dogs close to where I live were charging and then circling in fight mode as you describe....I find it very scary.  I immediately stop and try to calm them down by talking, whistling and being playful to show I'm not a threat. I just need to make it clear to the owners I'm rather dissatisfied with their lack of control.

Good luck with your next confrontation with the owners of that Collie - I hope it doesn't happen again , but if it does go for it  I sure as hell will in future! 

04/11/2012 at 18:17

Gee Bee - the problem with that is if you really piss the dog off by hurting it you could make it turn against you.  My view is that the best thing to do is give dogs a wide birth and if they do charge, stop and try to show you're friendly and not a threat.  Only once did I have to really shout at a dog continuously as it kept coming at me trying to bite my hands and legs....I was shoving it away cos it was a tiny dog!

Edited: 04/11/2012 at 18:18
04/11/2012 at 18:47
Paul J-R wrote (see)

Today, 5.5 mile slow run around the Common and 3 aggressive dogs to deal with.

So whilst I'm spinning round in flipping circles trying to face them and be playful with them, the owners do nothing!  And to top it off, when I pass the owner they say something like "sorry...she's just a bit excited".  And my response is something along the lines of "no worries", when really I feel (1) fortunate to have escaped being bitten, (2) after its sinked in...rather annoyed with the owner because it really isn't okay!!  What is a good approach to handling these stupid owners?

Cheers,

Paul


dogs are just one of those hazards you have to accept will affect your runs. Especially if you do runs on common ground or woods, and are likely to meet some.

Sometimes it's best just to stop, protect your nads, and just wait for the owner to close in. That's a "No worries" situation.

If the dog is physically intimidating you, or digging into your skin in any way, that's the time to do more than merely meekly allow it.  

04/11/2012 at 19:04

Really can't advocate abusing the animal in any way, they are just doing what comes naturally, it's the onwers who are 100% at fault.

Some dog owners are just damned inconsiderate, unfortunately.

04/11/2012 at 19:11

I have the same problem, I nearly always run with my dog and many un-controlled dogs seem to find me and her irresistible, lucky for me that she takes no prisoners  and does not seem to hurt just seriously intimidate! When I ran without her (sports injury) I was attacked by 3 dogs and got bitten on the hand by a big dog and on the ankle by a jack russell when the jack russell came back for a second go I kicked it (not hard, honest) and got verbal abuse from the owner for doing so!! He must have read my mind because he suddenly picked the dog up and ran away! But some time ago I was walking with my wife, four children and two dogs when without warning a runner ran through the middle of all of us nearly tripping over the yorkie who started barking. I would never run closely past a dog on or off the lead, where I run regularly I always say hello to dogs and owners then exchange pleasantries most dogs seem to know me and only hassle me for fuss and a dog treat that I always carry. This is usually a good way to get your point across without seeming obnoxious and aggressive.  It messes up my times but dogs are great, it is the owners that are the problem!

04/11/2012 at 19:15
I've been on both sides and I can honestly say that I'll ever blame the dog but there are some horrific owners it there. I run mostly near farms so I get the possessive dogs (I never run on private land but on the public roads around it). Normally a shout will be enough but I've actually growled at dogs before and it's put them off.

If you are bitten report it to the police and get the owners details.
Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
04/11/2012 at 20:37

As a responsible dog owner and trainer this sort of thing makes my blood boil. If I had my way, I'd make it compulsory for all owners and their dogs to have to attend basic obedience classes and pass a test. At my dog club we've found that almost always it takes the owner longer to learn than the dog. Most dogs respond very well to training, it's inherent in the pack dynamics. Look at a mother with her pups - she will always discipline them if they get out of line. Dogs expect to know their place in the hieracrchy and are happier for it. We have had German Shepherds and Swiss White Shepherds for over 30 years - my OH and I are Alpha male and female, our dogs know it and expect to follow our commands. That's not to say we don't spoil them on occasion, nor that we don't have fun and play with them, but they have to learn the rules of good behaviour and are never allowed off leash whenever anyone else is in view.

Edited: 04/11/2012 at 20:37
04/11/2012 at 21:28
Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

 If I had my way, I'd make it compulsory for all owners and their dogs to have to attend basic obedience classes and pass a test. 

Just need a few more MPs to get bitten, and I'm sure you'll get your way 

Hmmm, on second thoughts....having an aggressive dog doesn't sound like such a bad idea! 

05/11/2012 at 08:37
Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

As a responsible dog owner and trainer this sort of thing makes my blood boil. If I had my way, I'd make it compulsory for all owners and their dogs to have to attend basic obedience classes and pass a test. At my dog club we've found that almost always it takes the owner longer to learn than the dog. Most dogs respond very well to training, it's inherent in the pack dynamics. Look at a mother with her pups - she will always discipline them if they get out of line. Dogs expect to know their place in the hieracrchy and are happier for it. We have had German Shepherds and Swiss White Shepherds for over 30 years - my OH and I are Alpha male and female, our dogs know it and expect to follow our commands. That's not to say we don't spoil them on occasion, nor that we don't have fun and play with them, but they have to learn the rules of good behaviour and are never allowed off leash whenever anyone else is in view.

Completely agree with everything you say.

PSC    pirate
05/11/2012 at 08:45

this type of thing works well HARMLESS DOG ZAPPERS

We got one when we had to run past a house with lots of dobermans running loose. As they could easily clear the fence (and sometimes did), we found the zapper a great help and comfort to have with us on runs!  Haven't used one for ages as normally slowing to a walk and scowling at the owner works!  

Dogs do have a tendency to chase runners - it's instictive.  

 

05/11/2012 at 08:49

I was bitten by a dog about 2 years ago, women out with 5 dogs, two fairly large can't remember the breed now, and 3 Jack Russells, no leads and no control.  Whilst I was trying to fend off the big dogs one of the Jacks got in close and buried it's teeth into my calf.  Result for me was A&E  for about 4 hours wait and a course of antibiotics for a week.  I did report her to the police who initially couldn't have given a monkeys initially, when I went back to them later another policeman took up the complaint and she was given a warning.

05/11/2012 at 09:09

I was once bitten on the bum by a Doberman, presumably just because I was running (it came from behind, so I cannot see how I was seen as a threat).  It was on a lead but held by someone who didn't have the strength to hold it - I'm not overly sympathetic to aggressive dogs.

I don't really mind dogs that much...  I see great value in them as working dogs and as  companions but...

  • The dog licence should be reintroduced.
  • As bionic said...  compulsory obedience classes.
  • the social conscience of dog owners with respect to fouling has improved greatly, than goodness, but penalties should now be more Draconian and enforced.
  • This should extend to fouling of public trails & bridleways

I'd also like to see a debate as to whether there should be an enforced sterilisation programme for dangerous breeds.   These breeds have been created by humans...  and in my opinion, some have been mistakes. What is the point of these mega-aggressive breeds - that will happily tear a child to pieces, given the chance?  How many times must we hear "Oh - he was such a good dog - a family pet. I can't believe he's attacked little Johnny"??  All they seem to do, as far as I can see, is spread fear or act as living weapons for thugs.

Like I say...  just a debate.  I can see merit in that argument but would listen to other views.

05/11/2012 at 09:17

I have never had any problems with dogs whilst running myself but yesterday I met one rather aggressive and narrow minded owner.

I was marshalling a race in fields beside a river used mostly by dog walkers. It is a public right of way and this race has been staged for many years.

When the lead runner went by he asked me if I'd tell the group of walkers coming along if they'd keep their dogs under control. He'd obviously had a problem with them.

When the walkers finally reached me (at the same time as the mid pack runners were going by) one of the group started yelling at me about how the runners shouldn't be allowed to be there as they were making a mess, etc., etc.. After explaining it was a race I just got a "SO?!" spat in my face. She labelled all runners as rude and when I told her I'd been asked to tell them to keep their dogs under control, all hell let loose!

They could have saved themselves and me such a lot of grief if they'd just put the dogs on their leads and waited for 10/15 minutes for the majority of runners to have gone by.

All the other dog walkers seemed to be able to put their dogs on their leads of had them sit and wait for the racers to go by. This one woman made me feel so angry I could've chucked her in the river! 

05/11/2012 at 09:21
Run Wales wrote (see)

I'd also like to see a debate as to whether there should be an enforced sterilisation programme for dangerous breeds.   

Maybe after that we should focus on sterilising the dogs as well........

05/11/2012 at 09:26

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