Does anyone else not use a training plan?

21 to 38 of 38 messages
10/06/2014 at 15:11

I find them useful. I am busy at work and with kids so I find it hard to keep track of how many weeks I have before an event so like to map out the increase in mileage and pace so I hit the right levels at the time of the event. Getting the right mix of hills, intervals & tempo runs is always tricky as I sometimes cannot remember what I did last week so the plan helps me there also.

Sure you could do it roughly in your head but I just find it easier to note it down a few months in advance and can then check the plan everytime I leave for a run. If I miss one or need to move things around I am not bothered I don't get stressed about it I just find it useful.

10/06/2014 at 17:13

I have a rough kind of unwritten plan, which is to do three or four runs a week. One or two are standard comfortable plods of about an hour, one is much longer - two to two and a half hours, and one is much harder such as reps or hills or a decent tempo.

And that's it. In-between days are cross-training on the rowing machine (following pretty much the same sequence as the running).

I think some of these plans you see floating around take more effort to devise than to carry out.

And I also think that it largely depends on character and lifestyle. Not to take the piss, but there are folk who need to be told that today is 54 minutes and 30 seconds at hr 68.3 per cent of max on average, and tomorrow is 42 minutes and 10 seconds of which 71 per cent of the time you need to be between 82 and 84.8 per cent of max hr.

And there are folk who just need to know that today is a plod, tomorrow is a tempo.

I'm in the latter camp

17/07/2014 at 15:28

I don't use a training plan purely because of all of the other sport I do in the week. It bothers me somewhat that I can't go out and do the plan to the full, but I figure that my netball and swimming helps with my running in the long run.... 

18/07/2014 at 21:04
Muttley wrote (see)

I have a rough kind of unwritten plan, which is to do three or four runs a week. One or two are standard comfortable plods of about an hour, one is much longer - two to two and a half hours, and one is much harder such as reps or hills or a decent tempo.

And that's it. In-between days are cross-training on the rowing machine (following pretty much the same sequence as the running).

I think some of these plans you see floating around take more effort to devise than to carry out.

And I also think that it largely depends on character and lifestyle. Not to take the piss, but there are folk who need to be told that today is 54 minutes and 30 seconds at hr 68.3 per cent of max on average, and tomorrow is 42 minutes and 10 seconds of which 71 per cent of the time you need to be between 82 and 84.8 per cent of max hr.

And there are folk who just need to know that today is a plod, tomorrow is a tempo.

I'm in the latter camp

There's different phases in a running life aren't there.

I used to do whatever I fancied made up on the spot. Brought me to a decent pace. But after a while you need a proper structure to get the most out of yourself, mixed in with a strong core and luck with injuries.

Then one day it probably morphs back into a more enjoyable, unstructured plan again.

 

Edited: 18/07/2014 at 21:08
18/07/2014 at 21:10
RoadWarrior wrote (see)

Running is a simple sport why make it complicated? Just get out  there and run. It does not matter if it is a mile, 2 mile, 5k, 10k, 10 miler, HM, Marathon or Ultra Marathon race. Big deal if you train for it or not. Just get out there and run!

Lots of runners get stressed out about missing a training run or fitting in enough miles or worries about Where is the fine in that? Just get out and run! No wonder there are lots of so called experts cashing in on people's fear of failure or fear of potential injury. Just get out there and run!

Beautiful sentiments.

But probably a quick fire way to get injured and plateau!

18/07/2014 at 21:15

But Stevie you have a coach and follow a plan, and get injured on a regular basis.

19/07/2014 at 16:48

I get quite concerned at some people who train for, say a half marathon or a 10k by sticking rigidly to the training plan and then when the race is over and done with, they quit all training until their next event, where they will basically, start again from scratch.

I wonder where the idea came from that once the said event has been run, to not bother with any more training until the following year, where they begin it all again?  They would be better off continuing with their running until the next race surely.

19/07/2014 at 17:23

Lotus flower- yes, obviuosly it is not great that there are people that just give up altogether after their target race, but at least they are getting into the habitt of running, and hopefully after a few races, they get sufficiently ingrained into it that they incorporate it into their daily life, and start running as a habit.

Sticking to a training plan depends on your life style/ goals in running/ priority that you give your running over the rest of your life.

I have a bizarre work pattern ( surgeon, work 60 hr per week, plus a few overnight shifts which can be very tiring), and I'm 49, so need decent recovery time after either sleep deprivation, long difficult operations, or long runs, so I can't go much beyond 3 -4 runs per week, even after 10 marathons, and a handful of ultras.

If you are fit enough/ have a predictable enough life to stick to a trainig plan, thst's probably the best way to optimise performance. This is obviously the case for the more serious runners. For the rest of us (recreational runners), it's more important to listen to your body, and do what feels right at the time, than stick to some computer- generated set of runs, that don't fit in at all.

It helps for the first 1 or 2 attempts at any new distance- as it gives you the confidence that you should make it round ( especialy for a marathon).

19/07/2014 at 19:32

I can imagine the stress release those runs give you Tricialitt! Must have to make sure that fitting your runs in doesn't become a stress in itself?

Lotus, those train, race then quit types are more the casual type rather than keen runners though aren't they? I'm often asked at work what I'm training for, when often it's just normal week to week maintenance training. Some people presume it must be for something specific, rather than a weekly lifestyle.

21/07/2014 at 01:47

I do what I want, 3 months into my new hobby now; no injury, and my first Half Marathon in 1:53. I kind of believe no structure reduces the risk of injury, whereas structure improves performance; if you're constantly pushing yourself to hit targets something may give, if you're enjoying yourself progression comes naturally - to a point.

Unless you're professional, be flexible.

22/07/2014 at 10:45

I will tend to agree with what most people are saying on this - there's no ideal for everyone (no - one size fits all). I think that if you are going for a race, especially longer ones such as half/full marathons, it is a good idea to follow a plan but you can do this roughly and not get hung up on missing any particular sessions - don't try to "catch up" - you will only get injured. I think it is important to get a good variety of runs in - mixing speed runs with longer slower ones. After all there are always other things going on in life. I know I could probably do a 3:30 marathon if I stuck rigidly to the training plan but real life does not allow me to go out more than four times a week most of the time.

22/07/2014 at 18:43

Come on Dunney, are you making those assumptions off 3months running, and a miniscule amount of mileage?

The difficulty you'll find, is when you stop improving, and have to actually do a good amount of miles, and work harder. THEN is when structure is pretty key to reduce, and I say reduce not stop, the chance of injuries.

22/07/2014 at 19:24
Maxpower North West wrote (see)

But Stevie you have a coach and follow a plan, and get injured on a regular basis.

 

I reckon you got put on ignore with that comment Max.

I once read that most injuries are a result of training errors. I thought that a bit extreme at the time until I analysed the way my afflictions emerged.

Exactly what those errors are can be hard to pin down, but for me its carrying on regardless with a course of action when its possibly going to make you worse for the experience.

Total recovery and remaining fresh is the key. If you can do that, almost any training will make you a better runner.

 

 

 

22/07/2014 at 19:34

Not at all Ric, that's been in place for at least 9 months now

 

22/07/2014 at 19:37

23/07/2014 at 09:30

I am not sure why but Stevie intrigues me. I think it may be that he seems to tie in his whole self worth with his running. If anyone comes on here with a different view he seems to take it personal. This was best illustrated when Chingo used to post on his thread.

He claimed he stuck me on ignore for comments on the Team GB thread but really he never forgave me for telling him to grow up a few years ago.

 

 

 

23/07/2014 at 17:19

I suppose most of us have some means by which we identify ourselves (and others) Max. 

I identify myself as a runner at one level, but more as a runner who actually knows what he's doing. 

 

 

24/07/2014 at 08:58

Ric - serious question alert. Is there any difference between a niggle and an injury? Every year Stevie seems to suffer a 'niggle' or 'lock up' after high mileage. The answer seems to be keep running high mileage slowly and until it disappears. No expert but would have thought getting underlying issue sorted and maybe training differently, maybe less miles but with some very quick (like Dean) would get a better result.

Who knows? I will stick to 5/6 runs a week with 1 being long, 2 with a bit of quicker stuff and the others plodding along. Getting a bit less slow with this and managing to stay 'niggle' free.


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