Does being watched influence how you exercise?

21 to 40 of 51 messages
08/01/2013 at 14:38
Marc.S wrote (see)

how fast you run/how much you lift is directly proportional to attractivness of the person around you X by the probability of eye of the tiger being on the radio. 

absolutely brilliant !!

08/01/2013 at 16:17

I would be interested in knowing the actual rate of effort (e.g. pace / distance run) rather than the perceived rate of effort. If the actual rate of effort is constant, it leads to certain conclusions; if the actual rate of effort changes, it leads to others.

 

It would also be interesting to know what happens with female subjects being observed (and not just for Phil's reasons).

08/01/2013 at 16:41
Dan Ellingworth wrote

 

It would also be interesting to know what happens with female subjects being observed (and not just for Phil's reasons).

I wouldnt change anything if being watched my another female but would slow down ...put less effort in if being watched by a man...unless I had a baggy tee shirt and really good sports bra on.

08/01/2013 at 19:16

If i see another runner when i am feeling tired, i am inspired to keep on going, since i realise i am not the only doing this bloody mad thing called running, but really my pace never changes. I am on my own mission in my own little world. The outside world has no interest for me, when i am in the zone.

Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
08/01/2013 at 19:25

Have to admit, being fiercely competitive, working out in the gym or in a class I always work harder than I probably would on my own, and when out running I will always push on up a hill if there are any spectators even if I slow down when out of sight - sad, aren't I? And I've always got a sprint in me at the finish, it isn't only the men!

08/01/2013 at 21:06
dean richardson 7 wrote (see)

women watching men excerise - lower perceived exertion - the men are trying to convince the ladies that this isnt hard work and i can do this easily

men watching men exercise - increased perceived exertion - the men are trying to convince the watching men that what i am doing is incredibly difficult.

so men want to impress women by how easy they find it and keep men at arms length by showing difficult it is. 

Agree with this.

Us men are trying to prove to you lasses that we're supremely fit and are a better specimen than any other men in the vicinity and therefore it's US that they should be considering 1st when they are planning on who they wish to practice making babies with.

Unless your that way inclined, the opposite is true of when other men (especially the long haired, lycra wearing, fake tanned ones) are watching at us. And possibly winking.

*WINKING. WIN, WINKING. GOT THAT? WINking.

09/01/2013 at 01:40

What is the SI unit of "perceived" exertion?

09/01/2013 at 16:41

If it is only perceived, does it actually exist?

09/01/2013 at 16:57
SuperCaz wrote (see)

If it is only perceived, does it actually exist?

Exactly. That's why my argument was that it was a silly question in the first place. If it's only perceived then nothing's actually happening. The bloke on the treadmill might just as well be pretending he looks like George Clooney!

09/01/2013 at 17:15

This is getting borderline philosophical. Empiricists would argue that only things that can be perceived exist. Realists, though, would argue that perceptions are based on real existing phenomena, but that the perceptions might be distorted. I would argue that there are two things going on here: real effort, and perceptions of that effort. Given that both can be measured, why has the research only looked at perceived effort?

09/01/2013 at 17:18

I'm sitting in my lounge typing on here, but I perceive that I'm putting a lot of effort into it.  Will I lose weight and get fitter?

09/01/2013 at 17:45

What is the RPE of the guy running when watched by a man who is dressed as a woman?

09/01/2013 at 17:49

Very fast I would have thought!

09/01/2013 at 21:36
Some of us women would end up with black eyes. Not sure whether that would add much to our appeal
10/01/2013 at 10:25

I have noticed myself that I definitely speed up and improve my posture/technique when other people are around. Probably more so when it's another runner.

Haven't noticed a difference based on that person's gender but it wouldn't surprise me if I tried harder in front of an attractive female - just seems like natural male behaviour!

10/01/2013 at 11:06

I'm a woman and if I'm out running and I hear a car coming I immediately speed up and try and look like I'm not out of breath until said car disappears around the corner - sad I know haha!

10/01/2013 at 11:17
concreteangel wrote (see)

I'm a woman and if I'm out running and I hear a car coming I immediately speed up and try and look like I'm not out of breath until said car disappears around the corner - sad I know haha!

run along a busy road, you'll smash your pb's

10/01/2013 at 11:23
Dan Ellingworth wrote (see)

This is getting borderline philosophical. Empiricists would argue that only things that can be perceived exist. Realists, though, would argue that perceptions are based on real existing phenomena, but that the perceptions might be distorted. I would argue that there are two things going on here: real effort, and perceptions of that effort. Given that both can be measured, why has the research only looked at perceived effort?

 

Spot on. Because the answers everybody has given have, of course, been about the reasons for real increase in effort.

 

I'm sitting in my lounge typing on here, but I perceive that I'm putting a lot of effort into it.  Will I lose weight and get fitter?

...pretty much sums it up.

I sometimes feel like I'm running faster and more freely while at others I feel like I'm plodding. My watch, however, tells me I'm running at exactly the same pace. The real question is, since it's not a physical thing what is it that psychologically causes the difference in perception? Because if there was an answer to that, running could potentially feel more enjoyable more of the time. 

12/01/2013 at 09:40

I have on occasion found a little extra pace (bike or run) when approaching another cyclist or runner,but not all of the time.

It's in the pool I seem to get automatically competitive for some reason

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14/01/2013 at 16:08
Screamapillar wrote (see)
Dan Ellingworth wrote (see)

This is getting borderline philosophical. Empiricists would argue that only things that can be perceived exist. Realists, though, would argue that perceptions are based on real existing phenomena, but that the perceptions might be distorted. I would argue that there are two things going on here: real effort, and perceptions of that effort. Given that both can be measured, why has the research only looked at perceived effort?

 

Spot on. Because the answers everybody has given have, of course, been about the reasons for real increase in effort.

 

I'm sitting in my lounge typing on here, but I perceive that I'm putting a lot of effort into it.  Will I lose weight and get fitter?

...pretty much sums it up.

I sometimes feel like I'm running faster and more freely while at others I feel like I'm plodding. My watch, however, tells me I'm running at exactly the same pace. The real question is, since it's not a physical thing what is it that psychologically causes the difference in perception? Because if there was an answer to that, running could potentially feel more enjoyable more of the time. 

There could be physical reasons for the perception of increased effort. Perhaps you didn't quite have the same combination of proteins and carbs or whatever it is that you had when you had what felt like a really good run, or perhaps you had less sleep, or aren't as hydrated. In such instances, you might feel like you are having to work harder in order to maintain the same pace and it could be that your perception is matched by reality. The thing is though, that if it feels harder, it IS harder. The psychological aspect of running is very important. Feeling positive and confident and that you are running well can be half the battle won.

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