Does being watched influence how you exercise?

41 to 54 of 54 messages
12/01/2013 at 09:40

I have on occasion found a little extra pace (bike or run) when approaching another cyclist or runner,but not all of the time.

It's in the pool I seem to get automatically competitive for some reason

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14/01/2013 at 16:08
Screamapillar wrote (see)
Dan Ellingworth wrote (see)

This is getting borderline philosophical. Empiricists would argue that only things that can be perceived exist. Realists, though, would argue that perceptions are based on real existing phenomena, but that the perceptions might be distorted. I would argue that there are two things going on here: real effort, and perceptions of that effort. Given that both can be measured, why has the research only looked at perceived effort?

 

Spot on. Because the answers everybody has given have, of course, been about the reasons for real increase in effort.

 

I'm sitting in my lounge typing on here, but I perceive that I'm putting a lot of effort into it.  Will I lose weight and get fitter?

...pretty much sums it up.

I sometimes feel like I'm running faster and more freely while at others I feel like I'm plodding. My watch, however, tells me I'm running at exactly the same pace. The real question is, since it's not a physical thing what is it that psychologically causes the difference in perception? Because if there was an answer to that, running could potentially feel more enjoyable more of the time. 

There could be physical reasons for the perception of increased effort. Perhaps you didn't quite have the same combination of proteins and carbs or whatever it is that you had when you had what felt like a really good run, or perhaps you had less sleep, or aren't as hydrated. In such instances, you might feel like you are having to work harder in order to maintain the same pace and it could be that your perception is matched by reality. The thing is though, that if it feels harder, it IS harder. The psychological aspect of running is very important. Feeling positive and confident and that you are running well can be half the battle won.

14/01/2013 at 17:16
Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

Have to admit, being fiercely competitive, working out in the gym or in a class I always work harder than I probably would on my own, and when out running I will always push on up a hill if there are any spectators even if I slow down when out of sight - sad, aren't I? And I've always got a sprint in me at the finish, it isn't only the men!

Streuth!

I always assumed you were a man.

20/01/2013 at 13:38

I seem to be highly competative. Wanting to be better than anyone else does make me look like a neurotic individual. Some people like it , some don't.

Recently, we were on a club run, and did over 90mins already. I had loads of energy left and suggested that some of us go further. Not only that, go faster and harder and I wanted to burn everybody out - even if it meant killing myself.

Same in the gym, if I go on the tread or bike, sometimes keep going until I pass out or keep upping the tempo to make myself noticed.

I suppose a 6ft 100lb sweating athlete giving it some infront of 30 people would get noticed, or does it...?

 

 

 

 

 

 

20/01/2013 at 14:12
killermiles wrote . Not only that, go faster and harder and I wanted to burn everybody out - even if it meant killing myself.

Same in the gym, if I go on the tread or bike, sometimes keep going until I pass out or keep upping the tempo to make myself noticed.

I suppose a 6ft 100lb sweating athlete giving it some infront of 30 people would get noticed, or does it...?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes you would get noticed but for the wrong reasons...if your post is genuine...

20/01/2013 at 16:38
killermiles wrote (see)

I suppose a 6ft 100lb sweating athlete giving it some infront of 30 people would get noticed, or does it...?

Yeah, anorexia will get you noticed.

This is either a typo, a spoof, or you need help.

seren nos    pirate
20/01/2013 at 16:55

killer has been posting for along time bragging about his anorexic body....its a very strange situation

 he seems to like the attention

 

20/01/2013 at 21:47

A male will always run better under the eyes of a woman as they are trying to show their strength and stamina to prove they could be a good breeding mate. Whereas when a male is being watched by another male the brain knows that we are running and will think that we are being hunted and are trying to escape, so the brain will make us think we are working harder than we really are, thus conserving our energy as we may need that extra energy to fight, should we be captured.

22/01/2013 at 21:47

So THIS is what the inside of a runner's mind looks like! Stone me, I thought I was the only loony!

FWIW I go one way or the other in terms of effort when I am being watched, but whether I slow down to look leisurely or speed up to look powerful, I always ALWAYS smile when I see someone, whether driver, pedestrian or other runner. Often they do not smile back (!!), it could be that I look faintly manic.....the less I am enjoying the run, the more I smile.

 

 

23/01/2013 at 20:00

If people didn't think I was loony, they will have doubts now, just run my most enjoyable run with the biggest smile on my face after reading your comment Runnith.

23/01/2013 at 20:03

I deliberately go for a treadmill where I can see a person working out hard next door, preferably at the start of their session, then I think 'You'll never last longer than me'.

Childish? Yes ....... Immature? Certainly ......... but I just 'have' to make it a competition even if the guy next to me doesn't realise it ..........

23/01/2013 at 20:04

LOL segar! I am convinced that smiling helps!

05/02/2013 at 09:58

Runners frequently attempt to distract themselves from the effort of running. We count the number of other runners, ponder work problems, and recite lyrics. In fact a study in The International Journal of Obesity used music as a form of distraction for obese children and adolescents. They found obese participants ran longer when distracted by music than when they had no music. Presumably distracted participants found the running less effortful, and so they ran further.

For the male runners in the present study, a female onlooker could be an excellent source of distraction, resulting in less perceived exertion. Male onlookers could have the opposite effect. As a male onlooker is a more typical competitor of the male runner, the male runner might focus on running and frequently evaluate the effort that it takes. The consistent focus on effort with a male onlooker would lead the runner to perceive the run as relatively effortful.

06/02/2013 at 10:29

I imagine though that this effect only holds true for *heterosexual* males: as a gay male runner I don't give a rat's ass if a woman sees me run... but if a *man* sees me run, then A) I get competitive, and B) if he's fit then I try to put forward my best efforts while trying to look calm, cool and collected... the only time I'd care is if it were my mom watching, then I'd give it best effort


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