Good Form Running Webchat

Lunchtime Webchat Friday 12th July

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08/07/2013 at 14:31

This Friday (12th July) at 1pm New Balance's technical representative Garry will be joining us for a webchat on Good Form Running. Get your questions in for Garry and join us on Friday so we can help you master your technique and bag a PB. 

Post your questions below and find out more about the Good Form Running campaign here: http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/GFR

 

Edited: 09/07/2013 at 14:45
09/07/2013 at 20:17

OK I'll ask one and get the tread started.
I have just started running. did a park run in 31.01 which is the fastest I have done. 
The Question I have is when I run my feet feet dont seam to come that far of the floor ...I tend to run very straight legged and my back foot hardly gets higher then half way up my calf of the ground... is this OK or how do i change it?

09/07/2013 at 22:16

Im currently doing an asics training plan to try and get my half marathon time down to 1hr 45(current pb 1hr51)

But,Im struggling with the pace times in the fast run sections.,is it worth keep trying or shall i resign myself to the fact that at 44 and only been running for the last 2years its not going to happen?

10/07/2013 at 23:49

Hi, I am fairly new to running and currently very overweight (I am doing a run/walk programme). I also suffer mild asthma.

I am struggling to breathe fluently when I run. I either overbreathe and almost hyperventilate, or breathe too slowly and then have to compensate. I find it hard to 'breathe without thinking' and I generally feel that I never get a good deep breath, or get anywhere near full capacity when I run.

As a result, my legs tire very easily and I end up struggling even more because I am obsessing about breathing! I always sound like a steam train despite doing the programme three times a week combined with a gym/swim on non run days.

I realise I must be coming across as a bit of an obsessive, but I want to get this right when I am fairly new to the whole business. I love to run and love to improve, but I feel my progress is being hampered by my asthmas and inability to get a 'deep breath.

Hope this makes sense and appreciate your advice.

11/07/2013 at 15:35

I asked this question on twitter and although I got a reply, thought it'd be an advantage to ask the same question on here for people to see...

One of the 4 focus points of the Good Form Running is maintaining a cadence of 180 steps per minute, when I'm concentrating on this I'm running a lot faster than I normally would for a long run...is it necessary to aim for 180 steps per minute on all runs or only on the runs where you are running at race pace?

11/07/2013 at 22:12

I read that forefoot striking is good to aspire to but it needs special training - how do you go about doing this and what are the potential pitfalls?

12/07/2013 at 12:09

was running last year and bought a new pair of shoes (same brand and model) but first time out in them started getting pain in the inside leg just below the knee, saw a physio who told me i had over flexible hips and knees and needed to rest for up to 12 weeks as possible ligament damage although no swelling or other signs of damage. i rested and still niggled but no real pain and been happily plodding since then but have new shoes again just wore them walking to get used to them but the pain/injury has reoccured after running in my old shoes (havent changed distance but have got a bit quicker about a minute and a half for my route) could this be the change of shoes or something im doing wrong?

 

12/07/2013 at 12:43

For years I have been snapping over on my ankles, both, whether running or simply walking down the street. Often happens when there is a slightly uneven surface. Seems to be getting worse and happening more frequently, are there any shoes or exercises that could help strengthen the ankles?

12/07/2013 at 13:05
GreyhoundDad wrote (see)

OK I'll ask one and get the tread started.
I have just started running. did a park run in 31.01 which is the fastest I have done. 
The Question I have is when I run my feet feet dont seam to come that far of the floor ...I tend to run very straight legged and my back foot hardly gets higher then half way up my calf of the ground... is this OK or how do i change it?

Thanks for your Question Greyhound Dad. 

Lots of runners have different styles, the main reason people want to change how they run is because of injury. If you feel that the way you run is limiting you or causing you problems then I would recommend that you look at changing your style. You should take a look at the video on the bottom of this link http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/GFR as the video says Good Form Running can help you achieve a better running experience.

12/07/2013 at 13:10
KARL WALKER wrote (see)

Im currently doing an asics training plan to try and get my half marathon time down to 1hr 45(current pb 1hr51)

But,Im struggling with the pace times in the fast run sections.,is it worth keep trying or shall i resign myself to the fact that at 44 and only been running for the last 2years its not going to happen?

Hi Karl

Firstly you shouldn’t write yourself off because of your age; a quick look at this year’s half marathon rankings shows a V60 with a 71:30 clocking so I wouldn’t worry too much about that. My advice for you would be to seek out a training group in your local area (if you haven’t already), training with runners that have similar target times can make it much easier. Implementing the 4 principles of Good Form Running can also help you to become much more efficient and as a result lead to quicker times. The 4 key points of Good Form Running are explained here http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/training/the-secrets-of-good-form-running/9649.html

12/07/2013 at 13:19
Gillian Tebberen wrote (see)

Hi, I am fairly new to running and currently very overweight (I am doing a run/walk programme). I also suffer mild asthma.

I am struggling to breathe fluently when I run. I either overbreathe and almost hyperventilate, or breathe too slowly and then have to compensate. I find it hard to 'breathe without thinking' and I generally feel that I never get a good deep breath, or get anywhere near full capacity when I run.

As a result, my legs tire very easily and I end up struggling even more because I am obsessing about breathing! I always sound like a steam train despite doing the programme three times a week combined with a gym/swim on non run days.

I realise I must be coming across as a bit of an obsessive, but I want to get this right when I am fairly new to the whole business. I love to run and love to improve, but I feel my progress is being hampered by my asthmas and inability to get a 'deep breath.

Hope this makes sense and appreciate your advice.

Thanks for your question Gillian

Your asthma is clearly the main issue you need to address here and the best advice I can give you is to speak to your GP or a medical expert. Many top athletes suffer with asthma and it is something that you can learn to exercise with. During the run phase of your training programme you could try to implement the 4 key principles of Good Form Running, in particular you may benefit from working on your posture. To improve your posture we encourage you to keep your head up and gaze forwards and that your arms swing easily from your shoulders – this would mean it is easier for you to breathe and you will run relaxed. If you are, as you say, obsessing about breathing having something else to think about during your run may help.

 

12/07/2013 at 13:42
AshCoates wrote (see)

I asked this question on twitter and although I got a reply, thought it'd be an advantage to ask the same question on here for people to see...

One of the 4 focus points of the Good Form Running is maintaining a cadence of 180 steps per minute, when I'm concentrating on this I'm running a lot faster than I normally would for a long run...is it necessary to aim for 180 steps per minute on all runs or only on the runs where you are running at race pace?

Hi Ash

For those of you that don’t know, Ash is currently implementing the principles of Good Form Running into his training in the build up to the Robin Hood Half Marathon.

As I am sure you are realising, mastering cadence isn’t easy and there are many variables to consider. The reason we promote a cadence of 180 strides per minute is because it encourages a short quick stride, a cadence of 160 or below is typical of someone that is over striding. You will find that when you go out for a slow run you may be just below and when you accelerate or put in an effort you may be above. Once you master a cadence of 180 for race pace 5k-Marathon, you will more than likely run just above. One example of this on an elite scale is when Haile Gebresslassie broke the world record for the Marathon in Berlin (2008), his cadence was calculated at 197 steps per minute. 

 

12/07/2013 at 13:57
Nayan wrote (see)

I read that forefoot striking is good to aspire to but it needs special training - how do you go about doing this and what are the potential pitfalls?

Hi Nayan

With Good Form Running we promote a midfoot strike over a forefoot strike, the difference being that on the midfoot you come into total ground contact and the forefoot you land on the tips of your toes. Landing on your forefoot can put strain on your calf and Achilles.

There are a few things you can to master midfoot striking; you can try marching in place before you go out for your run to reinforce what it is you are trying to do. Shortening your running stride can also eradicate any heel striking as you’re reaching out for the ground in front of you.

Watching this video should help http://www.goodformrunning.com/learn-good-form-videos/166-forefoot-versus-midfoot-versus-heel-strike

 

12/07/2013 at 14:14
rachel statham 3 wrote (see)

was running last year and bought a new pair of shoes (same brand and model) but first time out in them started getting pain in the inside leg just below the knee, saw a physio who told me i had over flexible hips and knees and needed to rest for up to 12 weeks as possible ligament damage although no swelling or other signs of damage. i rested and still niggled but no real pain and been happily plodding since then but have new shoes again just wore them walking to get used to them but the pain/injury has reoccured after running in my old shoes (havent changed distance but have got a bit quicker about a minute and a half for my route) could this be the change of shoes or something im doing wrong?

Hi Rachel

My advice for you would be to get a second opinion from another physio, it may be that there is an underlying problem the first one missed. Also go into a running specialist retailer to make sure you have the right shoes.

When you can run pain free again consider implementing the Good Form Running techniques into your training. They can help you become more efficient and more biomechanically sound. 

 

12/07/2013 at 14:22
Wellers79 wrote (see)

For years I have been snapping over on my ankles, both, whether running or simply walking down the street. Often happens when there is a slightly uneven surface. Seems to be getting worse and happening more frequently, are there any shoes or exercises that could help strengthen the ankles?

Hi Wellers79

Wearing the right shoes can certainly help. Again my advice for you would be to consult a physio regarding ankle exercises and to visit a specialist running retailer for a gait analysis assesment.



12/07/2013 at 14:28

Thanks for all your questions, feel free to message me if you have anything left unanswered. 

You can also ask me and the New Balance team any questions via our Twitter account @NewBalanceUK #NBGoodForm or on Facebook New Balance UK and Ireland.

12/07/2013 at 14:32

Hope you can help, i am looking to move from a cushioned shoe (adidas glide 4) down to a shoe that helps with forefoot striking but still has some cushioning there, what would you recommend? i have looked at the 1010 but think that may be a trail shoe? also looked at the 10v2? thanks

12/07/2013 at 15:53

Hi Ben,

I'm converting to running in the 10v2 Minimus now, with regards to cushioning there isn't a great deal but you need to bring these into your running gradually....I started doing only 1 and 2 mile runs in my Minimus and anything above that in a more cushioned shoe. I have also struggled with various injuries due to the conversion from normal to minimal style shoes, best advice I've been given is take your time.

Even though there isn't any cushioning on the 10v2's they are extremely comfortable, light and a revaltion to run in! 

13/07/2013 at 14:21

Thanks Garry, , appreciate your comments

15/07/2013 at 08:23

Great! thanks for your help Ash, I'll give them a try

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