I am going loopy

Out and back just dont dut it no mo'

1 to 20 of 33 messages
08/08/2009 at 21:44

After 20 years of r*nning I am starting to find that I prefer doing a loop to an out and back course.

How about you?

And why?

[for dut read either cut or do]

Edited: 08/08/2009 at 21:47
08/08/2009 at 21:54

Of course out and back has its advantages:

It is hard to get lost.

Then so does going loopy:

You don't see the same thing twice.

 .

 .

Feel free to start a couple of lists.

08/08/2009 at 22:09
I like a out and back with a loop at the end. like a giant lollipop
08/08/2009 at 22:15

Out and back:

It is hard to get lost.
It is easier to do an exact distance.

Going loopy:

You don't see the same thing twice.
You can be spontanious.

08/08/2009 at 22:25

Out and back:

It is hard to get lost.
It is easier to do an exact distance.
Once you've run the 'out' part, you have no choice but to run back, thus eliminating potential laziness.

Going loopy:

You don't see the same thing twice.
You can be spontanious.
You can run the loop a couple of times and you'll only pass the same point twice but if you run an out and back more than once people could potentially see you pass up to 4 times and think you've gone a bit bonkers.

08/08/2009 at 22:27

I'm with marshalini, the lollipop route seems to suit me best

Out and back:

It is hard to get lost.
It is easier to do an exact distance.
it's easy to give up short of the planned distance by turning round early

Going loopy:

You don't see the same thing twice.
You can be spontanious.
Once you're committed there might not be an option to shorten it if it's dreadful.

08/08/2009 at 22:32

H.L

If you have the right loop, you can cut back to home any time you find it too much.

Out and back:

It is hard to get lost.
It is easier to do an exact distance.
it's easy to give up short of the planned distance by turning round early
Every half mile out will be a mile when you've finished.

Going loopy:

You don't see the same thing twice.
You can be spontanious.
Once you're committed there might not be an option to shorten it if it's dreadful.
A long loop is only a short straight line home.

08/08/2009 at 22:40
How narrow does a loop have to be before it becomes an out and back?
09/08/2009 at 08:25
I think you need to do a bit more than cross over the road for it to be a loop.
09/08/2009 at 10:21

Out and back's psychologically harder for me - you've run it once and felt ok, but second time around it feels sooo much harder because you're fatigued.

Loopdy loop for me anyday.

09/08/2009 at 10:45

I'm loopy, me.

Actually, I do loops on loops so that I can add or remove them to run any number of distances.

09/08/2009 at 11:06
Loops always, never been an out and back kinda guy.
Kind of reminds me when I go shopping with the OH up and down the High St - come to think of it, dont like that either
09/08/2009 at 12:21

Another vote for being loopy.

Lollipops are OK though.

Or getting dropped off somewhere and then running home.

Or out and back.

Oh heck, ANY kinda getting-out-there is good

09/08/2009 at 21:32
I did a loop today. I wanted to do 12miles and did 12.42 according to my Garmin.
From where I live in Lufbra, canal path, footpath over the big meadow, bridal path to Hoton, road to Barrow, paved footpath to Quorn, footpath to Woodthorpe and road back home.
09/08/2009 at 21:39
when i initially started running i did a lot of out and backs, now i;ve merged my out and backs into a giant loop of the local area somewhat subconciously (if that makes sense). well my longer runs anyways.

as for true looping a route, i;ve only done it once, it was quiet encouraging once i had completed the route, knowing exactly what to expect as i continued round again.

i am one for seeing new things when i run, so i like to adjust where i run. i don't mind the potential of getting lost, i tend to suss the area out on map my run before i go anywhere.
09/08/2009 at 21:54
I do a sort of zig-zag route. I run approx 3Ks out, turn up another road and run approx 2Ks back then turn again on yet another road and run 2-3Ks out again. Then I turn back another 3Ks then I end it with a loop round my immediate area of approx 5Ks. These distances can vary depending on how I feel on any one day.
10/08/2009 at 11:11
I like point to point best but that does involve a lot of faff with the cars if both of us are going out running.  I usually do out and back one way and then out and back the other way (canal towpath) that way if I get too tired I haven't got a huge trek back to the start.  Sort of all over the place loopy loop if I'm setting off from home though.
10/08/2009 at 12:18

Have I missed out on something? I only ever run loops! I once did an out-and-back race with nothing but a marshall stood where you had to turn round. It's never occured to me to run out and back really. If I like a loop and I fancy a change I'll run it in the opposite direction.

I'm now tempted to try an out-and-back - question, do you just get to a point and turn round? I'd be most likely to go up the old railway lines as they go on for miles and miles and are more scenic than running through town, so no road to cross over or anything.

10/08/2009 at 12:35

Out and back means it is very tempting to cut it short, whereas once you are on a loop (or at least once you're more than half way round) you have to complete it.

So I try and do loops except where I really have no choice - like the other weekend where I was on a loop but from (seemingly) out of nowhere a dog appeared and started running with me. I couldn't tell which house it had come from, and there was no one around. It was early in the morning too on a Sunday, so I didn't fancy knocking on doors and getting people out of bed. The dog wouldn't leave me, so I just decided to turn my run into an out and back and hope that on the way back it would find its home. Thankfully it did, but not before he'd run about 6 miles with me. It was a sheepdog so had boundless energy, and I certainly enjoyed having a four-legged running partner

10/08/2009 at 12:45
Hi Carrot,

just run somewhere and then turn back on yourself as you;ve done already i started by running along a trail we have where i live, The Tarka Trail. it runs between Ilfracombe - Braunton - Barnstaple and Bideford in north Devon. the trail covers some 40 miles i believe. lots of people use it for hiking, cycling and of course running. i used to run to a certain point then run back on myself, i'd pick out certain landmarks as my goals to increase my distances etc. naturally you get bored easily running along the same routes.luckily where i live it is scenic everywhere

at first i used it as it was free of traffic, fairly remote so you didn't have every tom dick and harry using it.Another reason i used it was never running out on the open roads before i was really conscious of people seeing me run, seeing me run only short distances and then cough up a furball from being so out of breath lol

now i am happy for everyone to see my struggling efforts - not , the old trail (out and back routes ) great confidence builders lol
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