Is it common for your gait to change as you become more experienced?

10 messages
11/02/2013 at 20:21

l went to sweatshop in meadowhall at the weekend and took my old (and first) pair of trainers in. l told them i found them really comfortable and was looking for something similar. They wanted me to have my gait analysed again so l went on this pressure plate type thing and then on the treadmill.

The chap dealing with me said l was over pronating and that this was quite natural for people who have progressed from total beginners to someone who has now been running for about a year.

The end result was me leaving there with a pair of expensive new trainers that dont feel comfortable at all

Has anyone else had a similar experience or does anyone know if this is a common issue?

11/02/2013 at 20:48

The shop guys have all been educated to treat over pronation or even just pronation as some kind of disease. It isn't.

Here's an example of over pronation in the process of running 56:30 for 10 miles on the road.

http://s3.runnersworld.co.uk/members/images/493151/gallery/pronate.png?width=350

 Yes. That's my foot.

Edited: 11/02/2013 at 20:49
12/02/2013 at 09:35

If you're not happy with the trainers, take them back.  The running on a treadmill gives some guidance but its not a perfect solution.

I suspect if you had a photo of RicF's feet 5 mins into the race his gait would be slightly different to the 56min shot above, and it could be sugnificanlty different on a treadmill.

Did you have any aches & pains with your old trainers?  If they were neutral and you were now pronating, then I'd have expected you would have experienced some aches and pains in one or more leg joints.

12/02/2013 at 09:41

Never take the advice of running shop staff.

If you find a pair of trainers you get on with stock up as inevitably they'll be discontinued next year.  

12/02/2013 at 09:50

GE, Sweatshop offer a 30 day shoe satisfaction guarantee, so if you are not happy with them, return them and ask for a new pair.

12/02/2013 at 17:08

Thanks for the responses guys. Ric, is that a neutral support shoe? My old ones were neutral, dead comfy and i never experienced any severe aches and pains other than the expected stuff.

Terence l think im going to give them a week/ten days max and if l cant get used to them by then then im going back to meadowhall to ask for a pair of neutrals.

These ones just feel like they've got a pair of rolled up socks stuffed into them and are slightly annoying even to walk in. My first run in them tomorrow (short one just to bed them in) so will report back then in more detail.

Thanks again though gents

12/02/2013 at 17:16

Ric, you don't overpronate anywhere near as much as me.... (hangs head in shame)

12/02/2013 at 18:32

Gareth.

I suppose it must be a neutral shoe as its a full blown racer.

The only concession I've made to pronation and flatish feet is replacing the inner sole with one of those rubberised arch support jobs from the running shop.

I like those on account of the 'give' in them.

Anyway. If you strengthen your calf muscles up you'll discover that pronators can run faster down a road than most.

Pronation is the action of sprinters. The fastest of all.

Edited: 12/02/2013 at 18:33
13/02/2013 at 16:01
RicF wrote (see)

Gareth.

I suppose it must be a neutral shoe as its a full blown racer.

The only concession I've made to pronation and flatish feet is replacing the inner sole with one of those rubberised arch support jobs from the running shop.

I like those on account of the 'give' in them.

Anyway. If you strengthen your calf muscles up you'll discover that pronators can run faster down a road than most.

Pronation is the action of sprinters. The fastest of all.

This makes me happy ric

l tried them out for the first time this morning on a short run and felt no awkwardness or noticeable difference in terms of comfort when l ran.

 

That said though, they didn't feel overly responsive either so perhaps my earlier convictions that my old trainers were ready for a change was with good foundation either.

l think i'll continue to gently break my new ones in on short/medium runs until i've worn them in. Next time though, l think i'll just avoid sweatshop and head to the metres to miles shop near me.

06/03/2013 at 13:08
popsider wrote (see)

Never take the advice of running shop staff.

If you find a pair of trainers you get on with stock up as inevitably they'll be discontinued next year.  

Hmm I disagree with this.  I have ALWAYS had my gait analysed and been in the same make and model of shoes for 2 years, when I started to experience some niggles in my knees and ankles I almost went and bought the same old shoes online but for some reason went to Sweatshop in Bristol.  Thank goodness I did as I no longer over pronate and am now neutral and after 2 runs in my new shoes (a 3 miler and a 6 miler) the niggles are gone.  I tried out several pairs of shoes and did not feel pushed into any particular pair, the assistant listened to all my comments on each pair of shoes and took my comments on board.  I am also happy that when I do go for a longer run if there are any problems I can take them back.


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