My road to Rio

Here goes...

101 to 120 of 235 messages
15/08/2012 at 11:51

PhilPub - i think it safe to say Mike Rushton should make joinng an athletics club the next thing he does.

15/08/2012 at 11:54

Haha - I've never been a member of a running club! But I've been married for 20 years to a girl I copped off with when mentalled in a night club!

Mind you, I've got myself thinking about joining a running club now.....

15/08/2012 at 11:59
Giving up Sex? Did that lady who Mo Farah went to see at the end of the race look like the Virgin Mary?
15/08/2012 at 12:05

Twins are a common result of IVF - he probably knocked one out when he was in his hydrogen freezer in an oxygen tank in Kenya and they flew them back to his wife as a Xmas present - about the right timing - think she's due next month.

15/08/2012 at 12:16
andy the deestrider. wrote (see)
dean richardson 7 wrote (see)

to be honest at 21yrs old unless your times are in the 14mins i wouldnt be giving up women and beer.  some things are not worth giving up. 

Sorry Dean i dont mean to be disrespectfull or anything but i think thats a bit of a defeatist way to approach things, if we all thought that there wouldn`t be any good runners anywhere.

philpub hit the nail on the head....for example Mo took a sacrifice to move to US to train away from his family to find that missing nano % that turns a 4th place into a gold. I think we would all do the same at that level.  

But at the levels being discussed here i would be more worried about looking back over my youth in 10yrs and realising i hadnt been living them rather than worried i hadnt reached my potential as a runner.   A more rounded life will make a happier and faster runner in the long term. 

Edited: 15/08/2012 at 12:18
15/08/2012 at 12:29

Paul Evans ran 33 mins for 10k off football training and after a few months of specific training ran 29 mins for 10k on a grass track at the age of 26/27. He ended up running sub 28 mins. So I would say that if the numbers don't add up to something like this then forget the future Olympics. I would wager that a potential beating 10k runner could break 33 mins for 10k when totally unfit. Its called potential. Can't turn a cart horse into a race horse, just a faster cart horse.

15/08/2012 at 12:36

 

dean richardson 7 wrote (see)

 

But at the levels being discussed here i would be more worried about looking back over my youth in 10yrs and realising i hadnt been living them rather than worried i hadnt reached my potential as a runner.   A more rounded life will make a happier and faster runner in the long term. 


Fair point but i think the whole idea of MR`s first post was to simply talk about how he could become that good, all to often the olympic champins aretalked about asif they are some special breed of Human, when infact these things are possible if youre prepared to practically put 10-15 years of your life into, yes i understand that theres less than a 1% chance of actually making it, but theres no harm trying, although i think to take MR completely serious he would have to do way more than he currently does in my opinion.

 
Edited: 15/08/2012 at 12:37
15/08/2012 at 12:47
I don't think the likes of Redgrave and Hoy actually did start out with "ok lets spend the next 15 years dedicated to our sport and give up everything to become olympic superheroes." More liekly they took up a sport, became good, became really really good and then thought " lets take it up a few notches" got to an elite level and thought " lets see how far we can really take this."

Probably something like that. More of a progression with success leading to an upping of the stakes and sacrifices.
15/08/2012 at 12:58

Sussex i dont literally mean 15 years for everyone, some sports are different so may not take nowhere near as long as running, but some realise that there not massively talented and will therefore have to work alot harder an sacrifice more because the reward doesn`t come half as easily.

15/08/2012 at 15:53
RicF wrote (see)

Paul Evans ran 33 mins for 10k off football training and after a few months of specific training ran 29 mins for 10k on a grass track at the age of 26/27. He ended up running sub 28 mins. So I would say that if the numbers don't add up to something like this then forget the future Olympics. I would wager that a potential beating 10k runner could break 33 mins for 10k when totally unfit. Its called potential. Can't turn a cart horse into a race horse, just a faster cart horse.

Ric - Good point - I've heard him tell that story a couple of times.

I think in most instances it becomes clear pretty quickly what kind of potential a runner has. The best 2 or 3 runners I know were running 34:xx minutes for 10k within a few months of training. These guys have gone on to become really good club runners but they are still nowhere near Olympic standard.

andy the deestrider. wrote (see)


Fair point but i think the whole idea of MR`s first post was to simply talk about how he could become that good, all to often the olympic champins aretalked about asif they are some special breed of Human, when infact these things are possible if youre prepared to practically put 10-15 years of your life into, yes i understand that theres less than a 1% chance of actually making it, but theres no harm trying, although i think to take MR completely serious he would have to do way more than he currently does in my opinion.

 

Andy I disagree. The olympic distance runners are "a special breed of human" in the sense that they are blessed with a level of genetic ability way beyond the norm. Sure they all work incredibly hard as well but someone can't reach olympic standard in distance running through hard work alone.

15/08/2012 at 16:18
Mr Viper: Agreed, If a runner has the potential it will show very early in his running career and at a level of modest training. Another good example of this was Dan Robinson who came into the sport via the treadmill at his local gym.

And as you say these sort of guys are few and far between.

Perhaps if the OP had spent his formative years running five miles to and from school each day, carrying his books in his hand he would be in a better position now to fulfil his ambitions.
15/08/2012 at 17:45
mike rushton wrote (see)

Nah im not trolling, infact I despise trolls, I am being serious.

May I ask for some advice? What pace should you run intervals? Should I run them faster, the same or slower than my current 5k race pace? Im kinda torn on what to do, I want to do what benefits me most.

I am currently a 17 year old running 14.15 for the 5km. If you have any hope of doing what you claim you want to do you need to join a club straight away and find yourself a good coach.  You will also want to start racing on the track at distances below the 5km because you willl find that at when running at a decent level all the best runners will have tremendous speed (i.e. Mo Farah runs a 53 at the end of 10k!). I can't begin to tell you how enormous a challenge you are undertaking!!!

15/08/2012 at 17:57

Sorry, but I just have to say this once and for all in really plain language. In 4 years time Mike wants to race with the very best athletes in the world, the upper echelon. Maybe even to make Mo Farah redundant. He's been training for a month of two now and feels quite good about it and is pleased by his improvements.

NO BL**DY WAY is it going to happen. Sorry. 

How long to get fit enough to compete at elite levels? How long to impress selectors with your racecraft and prove yourself in major tournaments across the world? They don't give out Olympic places in 5,000metres and 10,000 metres to people with potential. They give them to proven winners.

Sorry Mike, unless you start talking about the Olympics in Istanbul 2020, you haven't got a hope. The goal you have in your head is WAY more difficult than you comprehend. If you had more time, perhaps you could do it. But talk of Rio is utter nonsense. Stop making a monkey of yourself, join an AC and start working hard. Come back to this thread in a year's time and then tell us what your ambitions are, because right now, you don't know what you are talking about. And you blithley ignore the people that do have a bit of a clue...

It might sound harsh, but it's the same when kids find out that Father Christmas is a fairy tale. However, it is healthy to understand what is real and what is not. Good luck fella, but get real. Please.

15/08/2012 at 21:04

Good post Johnny D....i think it'll take Mike mixing with the likes of you (2nd U20 at 5k this year...great going!!), at an AC to understand the aim in mind.

So what about you then...is Olympic B standard in your mind? About 45secs or so off? Do you see that as doable for Rio yourself?

15/08/2012 at 21:51

Maybe we have got a genuine Olympic hopeful on the thread after all.

I'm keeping my eye on Johnny D.

15/08/2012 at 23:48
Fairplay Jonny D has some serious potential there if he's doing those times at his age, I wish I was shown that running was a sport when I was very young, I think we'd have alot of teens as qiuck as Jonny D if they were encouraged to try the sport seriously.
16/08/2012 at 08:41

I guess the draw to running compared to football is just miniscule....it's one thing being inspired by Mo's once in a lifetime achievement, but when you have the weekly glamour of the Premier league, with the more interesting sport, higher wages, and no need to run 100miles a week, then it really takes special will to want to become a top runner!

16/08/2012 at 09:02

All the more reason to celebrate the success of Adam Gemili, one of the rare occasions someone comes from football to running after realising they're better at running in a straight line than running after a ball.  Seems like a nice fella as well. 

16/08/2012 at 09:16
One thing that struck about Gemeli was that if you had that amazing pace surely you would want him playing up front rather than at left back. That is, unless his skills with a ball were simular to his skills with a baton.

Yes he seems like a nice fella and a good prospect for the future.
16/08/2012 at 09:54

Tricky - what do you mean Father Christmas is a fairy tale!!!

I think that the great advice on here is being missed - no-one is saying that MR won't make a good runner, just that getting to Olympic standard and selected in 4 years with no current formal track record is completely unrealistic.

I know people to say you should aim high but there is always the risk if you aim to high the arrow is going to come straight back down and hit you where it hurts.

MR - the best thing you can do is join a good AC and see what their coach thinks and how you compare with others that have been training and competing for a few years. Then reassess your goals and maybe (just maybe) we will just need to postpone this thread for four years!?!

Edited: 16/08/2012 at 09:55
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