New forefoot running site, blogs required!

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26/05/2014 at 15:09

Hi,


There is a new forefoot running site available which is constantly growing in terms of popularity, numbers and content.
We would like to invite anyone specifically with forefoot running experiences to send me a private message (with a picture if possible) of your experience in forefoot running. Good or bad. We want your experiences to be honest and non biast as we want both sides of the coin.

We will try our utmost to include all, but we will go through these and pick the most appropriate and widely varied selection. Good writing is a plus!

I look forward to receiving your stories.

Thanks
The Forefoot Runner

26/05/2014 at 15:57

I've got a good concise forefoot running story:

It's starts in 1981, I was born.  

I started walking soon after.

I then transitioned to running around.

I was told by everyone I walk funny "on my toes" apparently, I ran like this also.

15 years later there is this thing called "forefoot running"

The end.

26/05/2014 at 20:19
Essex lion
But surely forefoot running doesn't mean one runs on one's toes does it? To me it means that one lands on the flat of the foot and immediately pushes off with one's toes.

I need The Forefoot Runner to confirm this or not --------
26/05/2014 at 21:27

Ceal,

Have a look at the website for more details.

In a nutshell, you land on your forefoot (the balls of your feet), on the lateral side. The foot then rotates, comes down and the heel momentarily touches before springing back up again, lifting off your forefoot and toes.

Thanks

Andy

26/05/2014 at 22:02
Forefoot Runner,

Thanks, that is how I run. I am on holiday right now but when I have time I will try to respond to your request. It is indeed an Interesting topic.
26/05/2014 at 22:46
I've only got the two feet...
26/05/2014 at 22:58
The Forefoot Runner wrote (see)

Hi,


There is a new forefoot running site available which is constantly growing in terms of popularity, numbers and content.

Hi Andy, as my username suggests this is a topic that interests me (though am a heel striker when shod). Good to hear your site is growing in popularity and numbers but it seems a bit light on content right now? For instance using Chrome I'm unable to download your forefoot running programs.

Also, was that you in the barefoot heel striking vid? not a wise thing to do

26/05/2014 at 23:31
I am one of these strange forefoot folk. I can run mid foot with a lot of concentration, which does prevent some calf tightness, but my natural landing is forefoot lateral, pronate as foot drops to midfoot and then lifts up. No heel to ground contact for me unless I really concentrate on it. I currently have a back injury from heel striking down a long and very steep hill about a year ago. Tiredness and lack of downhill practise left me open to damage. I can currently maintain 25mpw of slow running without any major issues but any fast work leaves me in pieces. Roll on surgery in July!
Edited: 26/05/2014 at 23:32
27/05/2014 at 10:17
wannabebarefoot Andi wrote (see)
The Forefoot Runner wrote (see)

Hi,


There is a new forefoot running site available which is constantly growing in terms of popularity, numbers and content.

Hi Andy, as my username suggests this is a topic that interests me (though am a heel striker when shod). Good to hear your site is growing in popularity and numbers but it seems a bit light on content right now? For instance using Chrome I'm unable to download your forefoot running programs.

Also, was that you in the barefoot heel striking vid? not a wise thing to do

 

wannabebarefoot Andi wrote (see)
The Forefoot Runner wrote (see)

Hi,


There is a new forefoot running site available which is constantly growing in terms of popularity, numbers and content.

Hi Andy, as my username suggests this is a topic that interests me (though am a heel striker when shod). Good to hear your site is growing in popularity and numbers but it seems a bit light on content right now? For instance using Chrome I'm unable to download your forefoot running programs.

Also, was that you in the barefoot heel striking vid? not a wise thing to do

 

Hi,

That is odd, I use Chrome and all seems well.

Yes it is light on content, it is however getting more information on a weekly basis.

I will look into the issue with downloading the program and see if anything can be resolved.

No it wasn't me heelstriking fortunately! 

I am however going to post some videos in the coming months with some basic exercises and tips on starting out, technique etc.

Keep the site bookmarked!

Thanks

The Forefoot Runner

27/05/2014 at 10:26
YIDDARMY wrote (see)
I am one of these strange forefoot folk. I can run mid foot with a lot of concentration, which does prevent some calf tightness, but my natural landing is forefoot lateral, pronate as foot drops to midfoot and then lifts up. No heel to ground contact for me unless I really concentrate on it. I currently have a back injury from heel striking down a long and very steep hill about a year ago. Tiredness and lack of downhill practise left me open to damage. I can currently maintain 25mpw of slow running without any major issues but any fast work leaves me in pieces. Roll on surgery in July!

Hi,

 

Your gait sounds very good. There isn't much difference in a midfoot/forefoot strike. Your main concern would be the lack of heel touchdown when running. Without this your calves will certainly burn post run. I would suggest trying to introduce a slight heel touchdown on slow short runs and see how you feel. That instance when the heel touches down momentarily gives your calves that extra rest which is needed. Tip toeing without letting it down will give you sore calves for sure (this is from experience).

I always tell any clients I train to over exaggerate when we introduce forefoot running. After a a few months, you can start to relax your running form and find your sweet spot. Mine is a midfoot strike but if I want to forefoot strike I have to (as you do) think about it more. It depends on your preference and your running style, distances and so on.

 

Thanks

The Forefoot Runner

27/05/2014 at 12:40

As a midfoot runner myself (in sandals you really don't want to heel strike) I am interested in your site and look forward to seeing it grow.

27/05/2014 at 12:57

"Forefoot running is the natural running form"

So that being the case, why do we need to learn anything? It comes naturally to us. 

27/05/2014 at 13:24
The real Mr I wrote (see)

"Forefoot running is the natural running form"

So that being the case, why do we need to learn anything? It comes naturally to us. 

Hi,

 

Yes it is natural, although highly cushioned, thick heeled running shoes designed to absorb impact and reduce the work of the leg muscles, skeletal system thus weakening our lower body means we do have to learn how to run.

Thank you for look through the site anyway, and I'm always happy to answer questions from forefoot or non forefoot runners. We're not here to brain wash, more to inform and provide opportunity to whoever wants to change their running path.

Mummysaurus, thanks for the comment. I too am a midfoot runner, although I have never ran in sandals before (I seldom run barefoot, I stick to Vibrams). Perhaps I could learn something from you!

 

Thanks

The Forefoot Runner

27/05/2014 at 13:30
The real Mr I wrote (see)

"Forefoot running is the natural running form"

So that being the case, why do we need to learn anything? It comes naturally to us. 

I'm imagining the site isn't aimed at those of 'us' who already run this way naturally and don't need to learn it, Mr I.

27/05/2014 at 14:06
The real Mr I wrote (see)

"Forefoot running is the natural running form"

So that being the case, why do we need to learn anything? It comes naturally to us. 

When he says natural I think he means that if we didn't have trainers to run around in then we would all run this way. Have you ever tried heal striking with no trainers on?

With these modern cushioned trainers it breeds reliance on the shoe and not a solid running form.

It personally feels very inefficient to me if I try to heal strike as I have always run on the balls of my feet, so although I'm no Mo Farah, I do find I have a natural pace that feels quite efficient.

27/05/2014 at 15:17

http://static.wixstatic.com/media/a3fd2e_3237a7a5179b479ab74abf8ab794f482.jpg_srz_300_245_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srz

I'm finding this image (landing) confuses the site.

If you are going to use 'forefoot' then it needs to be used consistently. The use of 'barefoot' as used in the image above will confuse. Likewise with the use 'Shoe' - here I am assuming you are talking about a heel striking shod runner, and not that all shod runners (i.e. forefoot striking shod runner) run this way.

The barefoot runner above very closely resembles the 'sprinter' gait that Lee Saxby defines  and not that of a 'forefoot/midfoot' runners. I am assuming your view is closer to Saxby's 'Runner' model as demonstrated in the clips of heel strike / foot strike. An image conveys so much information - if this is 'forefoot' then fair enough. Perhaps it is drawn at the extreme?

As a heel striker the web site would need a lot of content to grab my interest, so if you do get some good content on transition including real world examples, then that would be interesting. 

27/05/2014 at 15:39

Also-ran,

Thank you for your comments.

Indeed, the image s misleading with regard to the site's content. I will update this to match.

 

A sprinters gait will usually have an increased stride length (obviously), longer leg extensions both when landing and kickbacks, and typically you land just in front of your body when sprinting. This, as opposed to heel striking does not slow you down. The landing platform of the forefoot allows the sprinter to transition effortless (I use the term loosely, it obviously is tiring!), and avoid opposite forces that will slow you down (as you can see from the image above - the resulting force goes through your ankle, knee and hip in the opposite direction of travel).

This concept echoes through all types of running distances. The best example of this would be Paula Radcliffe. A fully fledged forefoot running (so much so she almost doesn't heel touchdown which can really put strain on the calves), she is a long distance runner.

Have a look at this link of Paula Radcliffe running.

 

Thanks

The Forefoot Runner

27/05/2014 at 21:14

She is wearing shoes though.

27/05/2014 at 21:42

Hi,

 

She is indeed, although I cannot tell which type of shoe she is wearing.

I personally wear Vibrams, although there are other manufacturers that have more traditional looking shoes which also help transition to forefoot. I wouldn't really comment much more on what Paula wears as I am not sure.

I would say however running forefoot, while possible with regular running shoes, makes it hard to adapt. The high heeled cushion makes it harder to forefoot and heel touchdown. The forefoot/heel touchdown almost become one because of the additional cushioning. The rigidness of regular shoes also limits the flexibility required when forefoot running.

Perhaps a google search will reveal what she wears!

 

On an off topic,I will be updating the images on the site for more relevant images to the site content. There should be a gradual but positive following over the coming months. And we look forward to questions (and doubts) about forefoot running. It's why we created the page. To inform.

 

Thanks

The Forefoot Runner

27/05/2014 at 21:53

Vibrams alone put me off the whole forefoot running movement. Honestly you should see some of the knobjockeys who wear them at the gym Im in.

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