Running with Dogs

How far

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Tommygun2    pirate
23/05/2013 at 09:36

My children have been knagging me for a while now to get a dog of some sort.

Well you know how it is with kids, I'll be the one who ends up doing the walking in the rain and cold.

So with that in mind, I have been looking at breeds of dog that I could take out on my early morning runs.

I am seriously thinking about getting an English Pointer.

So those of you who run with dogs, what breed and how far would be possible with a dog 5 miles, 10 miles,  20 miles. I guess running in the counrty side is favarable to running the streets.

23/05/2013 at 10:22

We've got a collie/german shepherd/miscellaneous and she is starting to develop hip dysplasia, so her long running days may be numbered, but at the moment she can happily can cope with 10 miles; any more than that and I will do a couple of laps and drop her back home at half way.  I would think that a fit pointer could easily manage that and more.  She doesn't enjoy running on a lead and a couple of times I've taken her for runs on roads and it's made the soles of her feet sore. 

It can be a bit awkward when I need to take the dog, but I want to do a tempo session for example, so I've started to experiment with a HRM to pace tempos off road.  If I do hills she follow me up and down for the first few and then go rummaging in a hedge for a while until I've finished.  I've tried intervals doing laps of the local sports field and it's doable, but I tend to prefer the road or track and leave her at home for that one.

I'll not go into all the negative aspects of dog ownership, but for running, provided you have access good off road running routes then they are fine.

23/05/2013 at 10:24

Speak to GoldBeetle, Tommy - he has a lovely pointer that he runs with

Tommygun2    pirate
23/05/2013 at 10:30
*Frodo* wrote (see)

Speak to GoldBeetle, Tommy - he has a lovely pointer that he runs with

Yep have already spoken to GB, just wondering what other breeds people have and how far you can reasonably expect with certain dogs. As I have not ruled out collies but I have heard that they can be difficult at home.

23/05/2013 at 10:38

I have a collie-x. He was able to run up to 27-30 miles with me, but he had (and still has) behavioural issues because he is a rescue.

If you had a collie from a puppy, it would of course be different, but they are very bright, sensitive dogs (needing lots of 1:1 stimulation) and are generally more suited to isolated farm living than town. However, collie-x breeds can be far more robust/adaptable and the right cross could be perfect for family life and running.

23/05/2013 at 10:42

I wouldn't run distance with a dog on lead or on road but hit the open country side and my two love it. We have a 9 year old collie type and 2 year old terrier and they mostly cope fine with anything up to marathon distance and have done up to 30 before.

We do try to take some food for them even if it is only some bonio biscuits along side their usual treats and plan to have short stops anywhere there is water to keep them hydrated, more so on hot days.

One thing to bear in mind is that it would be unrealistic to start them off running 10 miles. They need to build up their base fitness the same as any person would although they should find it far easier to do; when ours started we stuck to around 3 to 4 miles at a very easier pace and started to build the milage from there and now they probably run 40miles a week or more on top of many walks.

Agree with lou that I wouldn't want them with me on tempo runs, intervals or any reps where I wouldn't want to be stopping to pull them out from a bush so maybe just the recovery runs and long runs. I highly recommend one piece of equipment which is an elasticated waist belt to clip their lead onto so that you are able to run with your hands free and still have some control when require.

In all ours love their runs and have been given a fantastic bill of health by the vet who even commented on saying if they didn't know otherwise they would have said our 9 year old had the body of a 3 year old dog. 

23/05/2013 at 10:44

I have 2 rough collies at home who are wonderful to have around! One is 18 months and the other is 5 months. I'm now getting the older boy fit to come running with me.  You shouldn't run with one under a year at the earliest as the plates in their joints aren't developed enough and this can cause health and joint problems as they get older. As collies are breed for herding they tend to be very good for endurance, which means good for running! Also the Husky breeds are very good... If you can keep up! They can go for miles without any worries

What you do need to take into account is heat and water for them on longer runs. Either natural or to carry it with you.

 

Edited: 23/05/2013 at 10:45
23/05/2013 at 10:52

I have a cocker spaniel who absolutely loves running with me.  The only thing I would advise is to train your dog walking on the run lead (invaluable if you have to run along a road, obsolete once off road, until you meet livestock).  If you walk train them, they'll take easier to running on it rather than pulling you over, which is tricky enough with a spaniel, never mind a pointer! 

The other thing worth looking in to is inherited disorders.  As above, GSD's are prone to hip dysplasia, as are labs.  Also, speak to a vet about how old your dog should be before running.  I had Ollie from pup and took him to a vet at the recommended 1 year old to have his hips and joints checked.  Vet was more than happy and advised starting short and building up, much as we would as runners. 

Have to say, I love running with Ollie, although he made yesterday's 2 miler a complete nightmare and ended up having to go back on the lead in the park as he kept taking off to play with other dogs (he was having a Spaniel Brain Free Day apparently).  He's good company though, and absolutely loves running with me.  He's also really good when we go out on the mountain bikes, and has learnt really quickly to avoid the wheels. 

23/05/2013 at 10:54

A clubmate of mine has a boxer he brings on runs up to 10 miles sometimes.

Tommygun2    pirate
23/05/2013 at 11:03

Last year at the Southdowns Marathon I saw a lady being pulled along by a Husky from a lead attached from her waist...doesn't that count as a technical aid

Anyway thanks for the replies...You can read loads on the internet aboout various Breeds but nowhere mentions running.So its good to hear from people experienced with runnng with dogs.

One thing though, is what do you do re dog poo. I know most people do the plastic bag thing eeew ( I supposed I will have to get used to that) when out running shurley you can't carry a bag of stinky poo around with you untill you find a dog poo bin......

23/05/2013 at 11:06
Tommygun2 wrote (see)

Last year at the Southdowns Marathon I saw a lady being pulled along by a Husky from a lead attached from her waist...doesn't that count as a technical aid

 


There's a whole sport for it called Cani-Cross, huskies are amazing at it, though I suspect most people would struggle to keep up with them!

23/05/2013 at 11:38
Tommygun2 wrote (see)

Last year at the Southdowns Marathon I saw a lady being pulled along by a Husky from a lead attached from her waist...doesn't that count as a technical aid

 

Nope. I've run with a friend and her husky. The dog may slightly help on hills but when they see a sheep/water/stagnant pool they will pull in the other direction to the one that you want them to go in!

23/05/2013 at 12:26

I've got two Northern Idiots ... I used to run with the eldest all the time, but found the longer distances on roads started to play havoc with her paws, and the bootie thing is just NOT an option, so stopped taking her for a while. She will still occasionally come out for a 4 / 5 miler on the road but I limit them to prevent re-occurences of the paw thing. Echo the youngest will also occasionalyl come out for 4 / 5 on the road but again I try and limit those too.

When running on the road they are quite happy on the normal lead just to trot alongside, and soon learn the requisite pace.

I have now started venturing on to the trail side of things so when I go out in to the fields they both come and will happily run off lead for 5 / 6 miles with no issue (only problem being for first mile they think its a game and continually try to take me out!)

I'm hoping to start extending the distance of my off road runs, so will take them out on those too.

 

23/05/2013 at 12:28
Tommygun2 wrote (see)

One thing though, is what do you do re dog poo. I know most people do the plastic bag thing eeew ( I supposed I will have to get used to that) when out running shurley you can't carry a bag of stinky poo around with you untill you find a dog poo bin......


You can, and you'll even find that in the depths of a cold winter it can be quite a godsend ! 

23/05/2013 at 13:27

I have a jack russell and he loves going out for a run.  However, we only ever take him out for 10k, no more as he gets really tired after that and don't want him to over do it.

What about a dalmation?  They were bred as carriage dogs and therefore can run forever - plus they have really good tempraments (well, ours did!!) and they are pretty hard to tire out.

Best of luck finding your new running partner.

23/05/2013 at 15:47

I have a Jack Russell cross who so far has been up to 16 miles. He regularly does 6-8 miles several times a week with me.
A friend of mine has 2 collies that run with him on all his ultra training, so up to about 25-30 miles
As long as you start them gently, as you would with any person starting running, up the miles slowly, then they can do pretty much most normal mileage.
If its hot take water for them, or run where there is water. If i am doing anything over an hour and a half I would take snacks for mine (eg some dog biccies in a bumbag)

23/05/2013 at 15:55

We have a border terrier puppy and I don't know how he will be for running but currently he is totally mad and very cute!

Edited: 23/05/2013 at 15:56
23/05/2013 at 16:11

I'm afraid the poo thing is part of owning a dog, you don't have the option of leaving it behind!  I double bag it and clip it to my belt until I find a bin. 

23/05/2013 at 16:19

In regards to the poo thing im fairly lucky in that they will either go early and therefore not far from some sort of bin or on the trail. Now not on the actual path were on as the elder of the two likes to stick his arse right in a bush ( i do mean right in it) and now the younger copies him so its rare im attached to a poo bag thank gods.

Tommygun2    pirate
23/05/2013 at 16:20

I am guessing you don't have to pick up the poo if they do it in the woods, right

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