Running with your dog?

21 to 38 of 38 messages
Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
01/11/2009 at 13:44
yes. Some races are mass start but many of them start runners off at minute intervals.
Edited: 01/11/2009 at 13:45
03/11/2009 at 10:35

I run with my 2 - a boxer aged 7 and a weimeraner aged 4. The boxer only runs up to about 5 miles with me - he really slows after that, and is much better in cold conditions, he overheats in warm weather (not often a problem in Yorkshire). The weimeraner I run up to 20 miles with, she looks at the end like she'd do it all again if I said so, whereas I am in pain with seized up legs!! It depends therefore in my view very much on the breed as to what they are capable of. Also, as has already been said on here, build up distance slowly. My 2 absolutely love to run - they leap up when I appear in running kit. They also appear to dream of running every time they are asleep....

Watch out however if they are on the lead - I've been tripped over be mine a few times, rather embarrassingly.

08/11/2009 at 18:03
I run upto 8miles at time with my 18 month boarder collie wearing a harness, but its still unpredictable when he's going to stop etc its like running with a kite! but great fun....
08/11/2009 at 18:10

I sometimes run with my cocker spaniel- hes just turned one so have been easing him gradually.  I spoke to my vet for advice on this.  Trouble is dogs generally love to sniff around and go and say hello to other dogs so I don't get a proper run, more of an interval session!

I sometimes go for my proper run then take my dog for a warm down.

Be careful of your back if you get a belt- If your dog likes to pull, your back may be a bit sore by the end of a run!

Edited: 08/11/2009 at 18:10
Bionic Ironwolf    pirate
08/11/2009 at 19:14
No prob - my Nemo stays just far enough in front to be leading but he doesn't pull.
10/11/2009 at 20:57
At one year old you definitely need to build it up slowly, Labs can get osteochondrosis in their front legs. I run with my westie. I started short runs off the lead when he was one and he turned two in October and can run 10km. The first time we ran 10km, I was worried, but we had already done 45 mins many times before, so it was only another 15 mins on top. He now does all my short runs of up to an hour with me. He has a harness that he only wears when he is running, so he knows what is expected of him. Strangely he is far more obedient when we are running. He is much better off the lead than on, he likes to run at his own pace. My dog trainer told me that if your dog lays down, rolls around in the grass or does other funny/silly things, its his way of saying he needs a break. Like someone else said, its best to run off road in places where you know your dog can get a drink. I always say my dog is a duathlete as he always swims as well when he is out on a run. Alternatively do what someone else said, use your dog walking as a warm down after a run.
11/11/2009 at 01:23
i have just started running and my patterdale terrier comes with me every time on the cycle tracks so as to avoid the traffic,i only have to put my running shoe's on and she beats me to the door jumping with excitement,she is also alot more well behaved as she is getting the exercise that all dogs need,if your bothered with traffic find a cycle track or local park,the company is also a win situation as you can chat without having to listen....
Edited: 11/11/2009 at 01:25
11/11/2009 at 06:13

I run with my border collie Murphy (he's 6), he's great when he's out running, stays completely focused and ignores pretty much anything else, which is good as he's normally not very good with other dogs.  I've got a harness for him, and a very long leather lead (like horses reins) which i run with in a loop so I can drop the loop if he makes any sudden stops and not get catapulted backwards

He's fantastic on the longer slow stuff, but I've also ran with my parents dog, a Hungarian Visla - she can manage anything from a sprint up to (and more than) 10 miles at my race pace, without breaking into a full run.  She's like lightning, and her stamina is incredible.    We did the Great Dog Walk's 5k run together in 21:12 which is only seconds outside my pb for 5k, and she still wanted an hours play with the ball afterwards.

I've got a flashing light for Murph's harness for the dark mornings, and a hi-viz waistcoat for myself - seems to do the trick ok.

11/11/2009 at 14:32

I take my 2 dogs running - Marley is a Jack Russel and Roxy is a Norfolk terrier (neither are pedigree) and they love it!!

We always take them off road and do the poo run bit first (don't fancy carrying a poo bag for 7 miles). However far we run and whatever pace they always have more energy than me or my girlfriend. If we run 7 miles Marley will run 10 as she zooms around constantly, Roxy will always stick like glue to us.

Its a fantastic way to spend some quality time with your pets.

11/11/2009 at 15:12

stephen...we have recently acquired a Norfolk terrier. Any advice on how he will turn out. At the moment he is just going into the domination period so we are having to be quite firm with him. Hopefully he will mellow when he is snipped. Are they good dogs to own?

Hopefully I will take him out running when he is older, probably just more of a jog than a proper run.   

12/11/2009 at 13:10

Great dog to have (any dog to be fair is a great pet). She is great with people not keen on big dogs but any other animal is fine apart from squirrels who she'd love to catch.

She is a right princess!! 

 Don't get me wrong she loves swimming, mud and dirt in general which she seems to attract a lot of but she likes the finer things in life like a bath and blow dry afterwards. I refuse to do this but my girlfriend loves it.

Good luck with yours and enjoy the running!!!!! 

12/11/2009 at 14:23

Thanks stephen...he is already developing a cheeky side to his character...typical terrier...big attitude in a small frame. He is still in the fright/flight stage but is getting on okay.

I'm looking forward to gentle runs with him...he is only 17 weeks so still a little too young to do too much vigourous exercise. 

He has already had the bath/blowdry routine...my OH likes to keep him nice and clean..although he was less than impressed with it all.

Agree about the comment regarding dogs for pets. We lost our westie in August and only managed 3 weeks before we went and found this new addition to the household. Abit of a difference between a 10 year old westie and a Norfolk pup...no lie-ins for us on the weekend at the moment...all good stuff though.  

13/11/2009 at 15:33
My regular standard run is round Poole Bay and 6 miles and have been taking my dog, a Springer, once or twice a week for a couple of years. A harness is better than a collar when the leash needs to go on and I always have a flashing light on her if its dark. She is about 9 years old now and whilst still as daft as only a Springer can be and getting a little portly she is great to run with though. The leash is sometimes awkward so we do tend to try for paths and quiet roads and she is actually very good at running to heel after her toileting has been attended too. Don't forget to stick a small plastic bag in your shorts pocket (sandwhich bags work well) just in case of "accidents" (from the dog, not you)

Andy
02/12/2009 at 19:28
Hi
I have run with my two springer spaniels for 8 years, they love it and never run off, we always run off road.
Nuala
03/12/2009 at 12:53
All interesting stuff. I'm looking forward to running with my GSD. Any ideas on the best lead / harness combination? Will be mix terrain of country roads, tracks and trails
03/12/2009 at 21:58

I love running with my Springer but theres not many places to run near my house without him needing to be on his lead.  There is park and canal but obviously have to keep stopping to clean his messes up which interrupts the run a bit

 The other thing I find is when I road run with him he tries to stop and wee at every lampost which is a bit sore on the back and arms!

 Ah well I will keep persisting wth him I am hoping one day he'll just run! 

 Does anyone know where you get the leads that go around your waist?

03/12/2009 at 22:55
The leads, with elasticised sections are for Cannicross, a sort of team race of dog and runner. The leash is attached to a belt to leave the runners arms free. I got hold of a cheap version, the real ones are bitingly expensive, just to try and found it awful. Perhaps with perseverance both I and Tess (the dog) would have gotten used to it but it looked silly, felt silly and was no improvement over just having a medium length leash and harness on the dog. Ditched it. Cannicross does look fun but both she and I are just a little bit old to start.

Andy
04/12/2009 at 17:57

Nah, you can't be too old. My Spring Spice and I did the Canicross Neolithic Marathon in 2008. We were 11 and 58 years old at the time and it was an absolute blast.

I don't do the other canicross events as the run is only 5k and it does not seem worth all the hassle of travelling there when I've got plenty of decent runs on my doorstep.


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