"The truth about sports products"

Panorama, tomorow (Thurs 19)

21 to 40 of 122 messages
19/07/2012 at 20:50

Its a typical Hatchet Job by Panarama.

They did the same thing about Racism in Poland before the Euros. There were no problems at all.

They make their mind up before they do the research.

Tabloid TV.

19/07/2012 at 21:13

Just seen this. Although a lot of what was said in the Panorma programme I can actually agree with, a note of caution - many non-runners might get the impression that there is no place at all for the various products (although personally I don't bother with supplements myself). In turn:

Sports drinks - no need for them unless you are doing at least 1 and a half or two hours running - they just top up and maintain carb levels for long runs. I see the point about the cyclist with the bread and jam but do you want to take a picnic out with you on a 17 mile run!? They don't make you run faster - training does that.

Hydration - drink to thirst which seems to be the current thinking anyway.

Shoes - no need to spend a ton on them - my last pair for general running only cost £68 and are simply comfortable to run in. Barefoot running - love the idea on a sandy beach - but do you fancy it on pavements with dog poo and broken glass?

Supplements - as I said above, I get all I need from food.

Interesting programme anyway...

19/07/2012 at 21:24

Didn't really tell much I couldn't figure out for myself, ie that energy drinks and protein supplements are lifestyle choices rather than sporting ones.

Not convinced by the bit about shoes though. The first predictor of injury is distance, eh? Ok, but if your shoes are all over the place you're going to get injured once you go over a certain distance, yes? Just choose a pair of shoes that feel comfortable - what's good for 10 paces outside the running shop may not be good for 12 miles.

I wish they'd looked at compression clothing.

19/07/2012 at 21:27

All I can say is that when I first started running, I did what a lot of newcomers do and headed on out with my usual pair of trainers.  Kept hurting myself all the time.  Upon getting my gait tested and buying a proper pair of (stability) shoes, the problems went away - although I did have some knee issues a while back (which is still hanging around a bit), I was fine for a good year after buying my first proper running shoes.

Might knock my protein supplement on the head as well - I mean, I can't say I've noticed any difference personally - at least not any extra difference compared to when I was lifting without the protein supplement.  £37.99 a tub is a lot of money!

I was shocked to hear people had died during marathons by drinking too much!!

Edited: 19/07/2012 at 21:28
19/07/2012 at 21:41
RoadRunner76 wrote (see)

All I can say is that when I first started running, I did what a lot of newcomers do and headed on out with my usual pair of trainers.  Kept hurting myself all the time.  Upon getting my gait tested and buying a proper pair of (stability) shoes, the problems went away - although I did have some knee issues a while back (which is still hanging around a bit), I was fine for a good year after buying my first proper running shoes.

Might knock my protein supplement on the head as well - I mean, I can't say I've noticed any difference personally - at least not any extra difference compared to when I was lifting without the protein supplement.  £37.99 a tub is a lot of money!

I was shocked to hear people had died during marathons by drinking too much!!

The business with people dying/suffering from too much water I understand is known as hyponatremia - which I understand is caused by the over-dilution of sodium, potassium and chlorides in the body and affects neural transmission, kidneys and some other functions - but it is extremely rare.

19/07/2012 at 21:58

Now I don't know what to believe.

19/07/2012 at 22:10
To avoid hyponatremia I thought you had to consume electrolytes with your fluids. But earlier in the programme they said drinks like powerade and lucozade which contain electrolytes aren't of any use.
I'm very confused.
19/07/2012 at 22:10

Didn't watch the program but I am pretty sure what the content was....

All I can say is I choose my brand of ASICS - new pair every year from a lot of use - because they support my feet, make them comfortable but most of all make me feel good when I'm running.  I like Lucozade Sport - because it tastes good especially after an hour plus working out and it makes me feel good

I make no apologies for spending my money on my running habit.  I don't smoke.  I eat well.  I don't binge drink.  I do it because I like it. 

I will watch the program though on iplayer, it'll be interesting either way....

19/07/2012 at 23:31

it is very interesting, but its very biased and considering they bash people like puma for not backing up their claims, they really are quite hypocritical in not really backing up their own with much more than oppinion and very diluted facts, 

its all good information but its just a little too biased and half information, well worth a watch though.

20/07/2012 at 07:29

http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/4/e001702.full?ga=w_bmjj_bmj-com

A useful link to a/the supporting article in the BMJ. 

Won't stop me buying sports drinks though - I buy for the placebo effect! 

Actually that's not totally a joke - I noticed when I started running that I felt better when I ran with water+a small amount of Robinsons rather than just water in my bottle. The amount of Robinsons wasn't enough to make any difference and I wasn't running that far then anyway but it just helped me grit out those tough bits when 10k was a struggle.

Edited: 20/07/2012 at 07:31
20/07/2012 at 09:20
Sheeyut wrote (see)

 

Actually that's not totally a joke - I noticed when I started running that I felt better when I ran with water+a small amount of Robinsons rather than just water in my bottle. The amount of Robinsons wasn't enough to make any difference and I wasn't running that far then anyway but it just helped me grit out those tough bits when 10k was a struggle.


There have been studies into the effects of merely rinsing the mouth with carb-rich liquids, the idea being (I think??) that you're tricking the body into thinking it's receiving the energy it needs.  I'm not sure whether this goes beyond the placebo effect but I'm sure it's tied in there somewhere.  I know that when I'm flagging towards the end of a long bike ride, a quick swig of Lucozade* really does hit the spot instantaneously even though it clearly can't have done anything to stock up/spare my glycogen stores yet.

*Other sugary drinks are available.

20/07/2012 at 09:42

I thought the programme was pretty good. The point is not that it was biased (maybe it was), but that the companies that make all these claims for their products rarely have much scienctific evidence to back them up - and they should. The fairest point the programme made was that you should search out running shoes that feel comfortable when you run. That's always been my feeling. I've never particularly believed in sports drinks, and the point about simply having a decent diet has always been my opinion. Ok, so it matched my opinions, which is why I thought it fair, I guess!! True enough, Graham Obree could probably take more food out on his bike than a runner can carry, but his point about refuelling after training or racing carried a lot of weight.

20/07/2012 at 10:08
Panther Hunter wrote (see)

Its a typical Hatchet Job by Panarama.

They did the same thing about Racism in Poland before the Euros. There were no problems at all.

They make their mind up before they do the research.

Tabloid TV.

But at least the reporter got a few jollies to exotic places.  Which was nice.

20/07/2012 at 10:14

What worried me more was that parents are giving their kids these drinks!

Poison yourselves fine but really?

20/07/2012 at 10:16

Not sure I agree with the panning of sports drinks- I see that they aren't necessary for most of the public that will do 20 minutes on the treadmill in the gym, but they are shown to have benefits for runs of over an hour, where some sort of refuelling is necessary.

As for the downer on stability shoes, that's a bit irish- most runners have shoes fitted to their gaits and this helps- I know when I started in the wrong shoes I was in a whole world of knee pain, but since being fitted for shoes to control my over-pronation I've not had a whisper from my knee!

20/07/2012 at 10:22
I think is was very good. When it comes to products in general, not just sports products, a lot of people are not able to use their common sense and want to believe in miracles. People who think that eating a yoghurt will make them super healthy will also believe that drinking Powerade will make them into mega athletes. I hope it can reach the dummies who buy into all the hype but the very part of me that protects me from it seriously doubts that it will.
Edited: 20/07/2012 at 10:23
20/07/2012 at 10:26
Tabloid journalism tends to put up big headlines and then very little evidence to back up the claims. I think they backed up every bit of what they said with plenty of evidence. Not tabloid jounalism at all.
20/07/2012 at 10:29
Sussex Runner (NLR) wrote (see)
I think is was very good. When it comes to products in general, not just sports products, a lot of people are not able to use their common sense and want to believe in miracles. People who think that eating a yoghurt will make them super healthy will also believe that drinking Powerade will make them into mega athletes. I hope it can reach the dummies who buy into all the hype but the very part of me that protects me from it seriously doubts that it will.

instead of drinking that sports drink I think most people could do with a swig from the healthy dose of scepticisim bottle...

 

sarah marsbar wrote (see)

Not sure I agree with the panning of sports drinks- I see that they aren't necessary for most of the public that will do 20 minutes on the treadmill in the gym, but they are shown to have benefits for runs of over an hour, where some sort of refuelling is necessary.

 

If someone could point me to randomised, large scale trial, on non-elites that demonstrates this conclusion then I would be happy with that statement, otherwise, no they havent been shown to.

They may have been shown to have a minimally small effect on small groups of elite athletes where there are no placebo options, whether that translates to an effect on normal peeps, whether it was statisically important and whether a non industry study can replicate the findings easily is all unanswered. Oh and how many negative studies did they not publish before this one was submitted for publication? And what is the reputation of the journal they published in and the authors? Was the study ghost written by the manufactuer?

These sort of unanswered questions were the exact point of the programme.

20/07/2012 at 10:30
Hypothetical situation; Beginner runner starts to run. He gets shin splints because he's a beginner. Someone suggests that they should get some fancy trainers. Beginners recovers and gets used to running and they shin splints go away. Beginners conclusion " wow these fancy trainers really work"
20/07/2012 at 10:37


sarah marsbar wrote (see)

Not sure I agree with the panning of sports drinks- I see that they aren't necessary for most of the public that will do 20 minutes on the treadmill in the gym, but they are shown to have benefits for runs of over an hour, where some sort of refuelling is necessary.

 

If someone could point me to randomised, large scale trial, on non-elites that demonstrates this conclusion then I would be happy with that statement, otherwise, no they havent been shown to.

They may have been shown to have a minimally small effect on small groups of elite athletes where there are no placebo options, whether that translates to an effect on normal peeps, whether it was statisically important and whether a non industry study can replicate the findings easily is all unanswered. Oh and how many negative studies did they not publish before this one was submitted for publication? And what is the reputation of the journal they published in and the authors? Was the study ghost written by the manufactuer?

These sort of unanswered questions were the exact point of the programme.

Maybe my use of 'shown' was a poor choice, given the context. What I meant was, during longer runs, it's useful to be able to easily refuel without having to stop and eat, and for a lot of people, a sports drink is the most convenient way to do so.

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