what happens at 10 miles?

7 messages
19/11/2006 at 12:23
I have been running for 18 months and managed 3 halfs this year. I train 3 times a week including 1 long 1 speed and 1 hill.
All now goes well. I haved got down 2 50 mins for 10k and 1.30 for 10 miles. My problem is no matter how slow or quick I go if my long run goes over 10 miles I blow up. Any ideas or do I just need to go threw this by doing the longer distance more often?
19/11/2006 at 12:41
How long is your long run? Maybe you need to lengthen it a little.

What sort of run do you do the day before? Your legs might still be tired from that?

Do you run alone? It could all be in the mind & a running parter might help you smash through this invisible barrier.

Do you eat before your long run? You should - even if it's just a banana or a slice of wholemeal toast with a dash of honey
19/11/2006 at 14:31
Hi there,

I'm no expert, but I run at a similar pace and remember finding it difficult to get over that ten mile barrier.

It's very tempting to train hard, at something close to race pace, all the time. But I found that the way to increase my the stamina and really stretch the distance was to go REALLY slow.

How about every other week, dropping the speed & the hill & just going for slow distance. When I say slow I mean a good minute to two minutes a mile slower than your normal pace. How about two 8 milers at 10m/mile (1hr 20) and a twelve miler at 11m/mile (2hr 12). I know this seems painfully slow, but it'll get you through the distance, and if you do it a few times - maybe stretch the long one up a bit more as you go - then you'll find that come race day at a half you'll be able to keep your race pace going the whole way and not blow up.
19/11/2006 at 14:41
it's a little wall!

try a gel or some jelly babies at mile 7 or 8.
19/11/2006 at 18:54
A 50 min 10K is a better time than a 1:30 ten - I'd say you should be able to manage 1:24, if you've been doing the mileage. Did you slow significantly on the ten? If so, could it just be down to pacing?
19/11/2006 at 19:11
More miles per week will cure the problem.
10 miles is a real speed/endurance distance so you need miles to build the endurance. Add another run per week and build more miles. Make 10 miles the minimum for your long run. If the hill session is causing you to run lower miles change it to a longer run, say 6 miles on a hilly circuit.
JJ
Blisters    pirate
20/11/2006 at 19:51
JJ's right.

Run more. Run longer too. If you enjoy HM's, and lots do, then I'd suggest making your regular long run 14 or 15 miles. That way the HM is a doddle. The midweek sessions look good with hills and "speed". Although I don't know whether the speed session is tempo (ie a 6 miler at a hearty push, just outside the comfort zone, say at HM pace), or whether it is an interval session (1 mile eyeballs out, 2 min rest, repeat repeat repeat. Add a mile warm up and warm down. A good session).
The hills and speed sessions are good for improving leg speed, but won't improve your endurance much. That's where running more miles at an easy pace will help.

Excuses:
1-I'm tired: You need a run, any run.
2-I ran hard yesterday: You need an easy run.
3-I ran last night, I've only got time this morning: Great, you need a run, see 1.
4-I ran this morning: Go onnnnn, you know you want to.

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