Why would an average marathon runner such as Claire Squires take drugs to...

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30/01/2013 at 14:34

Hang on it was a suppliment. Who is to say that what we take in an energy gel does not contain the same ingredient and there but for the grace of God go any of us.

I think it's crass and insensitive of you to post this. 

30/01/2013 at 14:35

That drug was legally sold and marketed until after her death as a sports aid, much like the gels, sports drinks etc most runners would consume on endurance runs like a marathon.

Why would she take it? Personal goal and marketing. Doesn't matter if you are aiming for sub-5, sub-4, sub-3 or to win the race. Most will do what they think will help them achieve that objective, be that specific types of training, nutrition or sports products like gels and drinks that claim to aid performance.

Plus it has also been reported that she was diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat, which would be the more likely culprit but that doesn't sell newspapers!

Edited: 30/01/2013 at 14:37
30/01/2013 at 14:41

Its the calling her silly/stupid that is offensive. Justify it how you like.

30/01/2013 at 14:42

The product has been banned since August 2012. It also hasn't been claimed that it caused her death, just that it was in her water bottle.

Young woman with irregular heartbeat drops dead during marathon, doesn't have the same headline grabbing bullsh*t though. So his comment is more than fair.

30/01/2013 at 14:46
Eggyh73 wrote (see)

The product has been banned since August 2012.

that will make sure no-one ever takes it again.

30/01/2013 at 14:59

She had probably taken drugs before. Have you looked the ingredients of any sports supplement? For the most part they are drugs. She took a supplement that included that drug. She had used it in training according to her boyfriend. In the same way that most marathon runners experiment with their nutrition on their LSRs. She done nothing radically different than anyone else on the start line that day. She had planned on it to help her energy levels in the later stages of the race. In the exact same way you might any other sports drink supplement or energy gel.

Even at that the supplement she used is only banned due to one ingredient in it, which is due to possible side affects. I think many here could rattle off issues they've had with drinks and gels on long runs. I know I can for one.

The marathon is a big deal. It needs respect. Many of us forget that as we have done so many, but going on the report her heart issue was never reported to her GP. She chose to run 26.2 miles with that condition without consulting her GP, pushing for a faster time meaning working the heart harder in training and in the race.

There is no scientific proof this substance was in any way connected to her tragic death. The headlines are nothing but sensationalist gibberish to attract clicks and newspaper sales. If she did anything wrong it was a folly of youth and ignoring the heart issue.

Edited: 30/01/2013 at 15:00
30/01/2013 at 15:00

I think you're being a bit dramatic.  Your original post virtually draws a parallel between Claire Squires' "stunt" and the practise of traking banned drugs for performance enhancement, when in fact what she did was use a supplement - which at the time was perfectly legal - most likely marketed to suggest it was more akin to taking a caffeine-enhanced energy gel for a quick "boost" towards the end of the race.

With the benefit of hindsight, maybe it was unwise for someone with an irregular heartbeat to use any form of stimulant, and maybe a GP would have advised her against the use of such a supplement, but at the end of the day it's still a very unfortunate and tragic accident.

30/01/2013 at 15:00

I would have used more conciliatory if I'd written the OP - but raising the debate is valid IMO.

Are we sure that this is just sensationist journalism?  One quote is "Prof Sharma said the high potassium levels detected, her very stiff body and evidence of blood clotting, would "certainly fit with pure amphetamine use".

I wouldn't call its use "stupid" because it seems that, to the consumer, it was a legitimate over-the-counter supplement at the time.  With hindsight it looks stupid... and to be fair, I would never touch anything like that.

But people do.  And maybe this sort of incident needs highlighting, so that the authorities do more investigations into the safety of some of these body-building type supplements.  It worries me that my younger relatives get tempted by the marketing and peer pressure.

 

30/01/2013 at 15:02
kittenkat wrote (see)

The coroner has ruled that the drug was a factor in her death, so the drug was a factor in her death.

No he hasn't. The drug was found in her water bottle. They can't even confirm if she drank it.

EDIT: What they said it was "possible", but as I state they can't actually confirm she even took it that day. The drug has been banned since due to other studies on it.

Edited: 30/01/2013 at 15:04
30/01/2013 at 15:07

Clearly there is a connection, it showed up in the autopsy. The fact that she "didn't get on with it" when she used it before should probably have been a sign that she should try switching to something else to give her an energy boost but she doesn't have the benefit of hindsight, sadly. It's a good thing that this stuff is now banned.

Perhaps it's a sign that we should all stick to jelly babies and cereal bars - at least you know what's in them.

30/01/2013 at 15:12
I will forgive Jenny for beginning this debate in such a hissy way because it starts an interesting debate.
I think you cannot compare her to Lance Armstrong in a cheating sense. The fact that this "amazing formula" would help her through a marathon may have have been difficult to resist. Not much difference than me supping a glass of beetroot juice before a race to help me perform better. We all want to perform our best on the day right? The important thing is that there is no better way to prepare for a race than good training and preparation. There are no short cuts and easy routes. Forget the supplements and concentrate on good training and sensible eating and hydration.
30/01/2013 at 15:16
kittenkat wrote (see)
Eggyh73 wrote (see)
kittenkat wrote (see)

The coroner has ruled that the drug was a factor in her death, so the drug was a factor in her death.

No he hasn't. The drug was found in her water bottle. They can't even confirm if she drank it.

EDIT: What they said it was "possible", but as I state they can't actually confirm she even took it that day. The drug has been banned since due to other studies on it.

Not according to the BBC, clicky!

 

The BBC article is badly written. Notice they don't quote the corners words, but try to summarise for him!

Let's face it with her heart issue, running for a PB your heart is working big time anyway. The product if she took it increases heart rate which is adding extra pressure, mind you caffeine would do the same trick.

I agree she was daft to ignore the fact she didn't get on with it during her long runs, but they don't specify what "didn't get on was". That could have been anything from feeling ill due to heart pressure, a dose of the trots or some good old fashioned stomach cramps.

Edited: 30/01/2013 at 15:17
30/01/2013 at 15:17
Sometimes a "troll" is needed to open a debate so fairplay to you Jenny. I think we used to call it playing Devil's advocate.
30/01/2013 at 15:37

From The Guardian:

Prof William McKenna of the University College London hospitals trust, who reviewed Squires's medical records, said he found "significant levels" of the amphetamine-like substance in her blood. The energy drink was, he added, "an important factor" in Squires's death.

"In an apparently fit and healthy young woman who dies suddenly in the last stages of the London marathon, with no abnormalities identified to explain her death, the toxicology identifying an amphetamine-like substance does suggest its contribution to her arrest, particularly after excessive exercise," he said.

"In the absence of further evidence, we think the irregular heartbeat is a red herring and the substance found in the blood is an important factor in the outcome."

30/01/2013 at 15:40

That is completely different from the report they and others had up earlier. Fair enough.

 

30/01/2013 at 15:42

Indeed we don't know what "didn't get on" with the supplement means. Perhaps it gave her the trots or something (though to be honest, I've read little about this case).

It seems likely that she's just taking an over the counter, legitimate supplement... and was probably completely unaware of the controversy surrounding the product.  It's unlikely that the shop brought the problems to her attention... and why should she go searching for information about it?  It was legal and on sale in mainstream shops, just like the Tesco burgers I'm having for tea tonight...  I can fully trust them to be perfectly OK, without checking the internet for information

To take the sugar coating off...  I think the OP is indeed being crass in using words like stupid, foolish etc about the girl.   The 'stupid and foolish' people were the people making money by continuing to manufacture and supply it to consumers.

And though it's sometimes nice to be forthright, there are some occasions where it is socially unacceptable to just shoot from the hip.

30/01/2013 at 15:43

Whose Jenny?

30/01/2013 at 15:51
Run Wales wrote (see)

To take the sugar coating off...  I think the OP is indeed being crass in using words like stupid, foolish etc about the girl.   The 'stupid and foolish' people were the people making money by continuing to manufacture and supply it to consumers.

 

Although to be honest every drug on the market has possible side affects from pick it up at the supermarket aspirin to prescribed drugs from your GP.

The drug here must have passed approval at some point to have been sold legally, but there are cases of drugs being pulled as certain issues are not discovered until they are out there. No drug company will pull a drug based on possibles either. Sadly the millions they invest in developing the drug and getting it to market will be first and foremost in their mind unless they have a bad drug epidemic on their hands.

30/01/2013 at 15:56

A couple of my friends bought a weight loss product from health food shops that sounds scarily similar, they were raving about the way it made them lose weight by making their "bodies work harder" even at rest - increased heart rate and increased core temperature.

I told them at the time that I thought taking some kind of legal speed to lose weight was the stupidest thing I'd heard, but will send those linked articles to them. Whatever it is they were taking was available to buy during summer 2012.

30/01/2013 at 16:00

This is incredibly sad, as the only thing we can be certain of is that she had no idea that this "boost" would have such catastrophic effects.

I'd never heard of DMAA prior to reading the BBC website, but a quick google shows its been marketed as a geranium extract for several years, which sounds quite benign.  Its only in recent years (and since the VLM in the UK) that suspicions have been raised and countries have started banning it. 

As NLR mentioned, I don't think there's any runner in a marathon who isn't looking for a nutrional boost - be it beetroot shots or jelly babies!  Its one of the major differentiators between the marathon and shorter runs, as you have to consider fuelling during the event.

 

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