Diet?

What's your diet for running?

1 to 20 of 28 messages
06/09/2012 at 09:23
I'm looking into my diet so I can loose wait. But looking into thers diets to see what I can plan off? And I am new to running as well. Mike
06/09/2012 at 09:41
Hello kittenkat,
My message did not make any sence. Ha ha.
Ment to say, see what other peopls diet are on here. So I can have an idea and make a plan.

Mike
06/09/2012 at 09:56

portobello and asparagus pasta

pasta

pasta

more pasta

lucozade sport

06/09/2012 at 09:57
Would it be high carbs in the morning, and protein?
06/09/2012 at 10:08
Ha ha lots of pasta, I'm not running every day at the moment I'm breaking my self in, so may be to much pasta.
06/09/2012 at 10:11
Recent advice was that if people drank less lucozade sport and replaced it with water they would lose weight and run faster
06/09/2012 at 12:29

Sussex runner - that's absolutely true. The benefits of sports drinks are very small. If anyone is interested I wrote a piece on the benefits of Orgnic food:

http://takeitinyourstride.co.uk/2012/09/is-organic-food-better-for-you/

I don't think there's any real benefit despite having read in countless places that runners should eat organic.

06/09/2012 at 13:14

Lo-carb at weekends.. the long ri=un will burn that fat right off!

06/09/2012 at 13:49
Alone again........naturally
06/09/2012 at 15:52

the more you run, the more carbs you need. I am running and eating more than I have ever done at the moment. I love it.

Average work day:

Breakfast : little muesli, two slices of toast - porridge in winter.

Lunch : sandwich

Mid afternoon snack : cereal bar thing or mixed nuts/raisins.

Evening: normal meal, usually quite large - plenty of pasta, noodles, rice or potatoes with whatever. Plenty of veg too.

Evening snack: yoghurt or something similar

Chuck in loads of fruit with all that...plenty of water + tea/coffee during the day, a few beers or wines some(most) evenings.

You did ask.

06/09/2012 at 16:06

When I'm running up to 40 mile weeks I eat loads, when I've done 100 mile + weeks I seem to eat hardly anything.

Edited: 06/09/2012 at 16:07
06/09/2012 at 16:07

Another aspect of eating to think about is the calorie density of foods, because since it takes about 20mins for the brain to realise your stomach is full this means you can fairly easily eat atleast 1500+calories before feeling full if it was chocalate, cakes, biscuits, chips, pizza ect.

 I'm not saying you eat rubbish food but by swapping for lower density foods like the obvious things like fruit and veg and so on, it means that you start feeling full before you've reached the "high energy" foods. this made the difference for me, because i no longer feel the need or even want junk food for "afters" or "desert" whatever people want to call it. so by doing this its easily dropping as many as 500 calories of the end of tea time.

hope that helps.

06/09/2012 at 16:12

Just google 'runners diet', you can find lots of useful advice browsing on google.

Just make sure you eat plenty of carbs(70-75%), proteins (15-20%) and healthy fats (10-15%). Avoid eating foods high in fibre before running, stay hydrated throughout the day and the sooner you eat after a workout the better, best to have protein post-workout. 

06/09/2012 at 17:37

I'm currently training for a fast half. I'm lactose intollerant hence some of the weirdness in this. I'm not trying to lose weight, but I eat fairly heathily most of the time.

On a evening training day e.g. Today so far:

Breakfast - crunchy nut cornflakes and crunchy bran mixed with hazelnut milk, fresh mint in hot water (to make a mint tea)

Midmorning - peppermint tea and a pastry (naughty)

Lunch - 3 mini pittas with salad and falafel, bar of chocolate

Snack - (another) peppermint tea (I'm trying to stay off caffeine as much as possible at the moment, hence the mint tea addiction) and a bowl of fruit (raspberries, strawberries, peach). 

I'll do my session about 6.30 and have a soya milk banana milkshake straight afterwards. Then I'll have dinner which will probably be leftovers from last night, which is baked potatos with tuna and sweetcorn mayo and salad. I don't tend to have pudding, if I'm hungry later I'll have a cup of cereals with soya milk or soya yoghurt or bread and jam.

 

On a before work training day e.g. this Tuesday:

coffee before, and energy gel during 1hr35 run

breakfast - porridge (made with water) with peach, raspberries, strawberries and maple syrup, with peppermint tea (this ideally would have had some protein)

midmorning - cup of alprosoya chocolate soya milk

lunch - same as lunch above with peppermint tea

dinner - morrocon tagine containing king prawns, corgette, mixed peppers, parsnip, carrot, white onion, broccolli with garlic bread. no pudding or snacking after.

06/09/2012 at 18:19

I am currently experimenting with lowish carb - i.e no starchy carbs (only fruit and veg carbs) for majority of time except for after workouts when anything goes. Been doing it for a few months now with no obvious down sides other than occasional mental wibbles about whether or not I am carb depleted.

 

Working surprisingly well.  Did an okay half marathon at the weekend - expected to bonk after a long week of training - no taper - and only a very small addition of a bread roll and a piece of cake the day before and some granola the morning of the race.  But - no, ran faster than I thought.

 

Not suggesting this is the perfect runners diet - just saying that there are options out there other than pasta for brekkie,lunch and dinner.  I am also doing the opposite of the 'big meal in the morning' - i.e. lighter througout the day and larger at night post training - working well on the fat-loss front.

Edited: 06/09/2012 at 18:20
06/09/2012 at 21:36

2 or 3 mugs of tea, no sugar. 10 mile run. 2 plain bagels, two boiled eggs, coffee.

During the day eat another 4 or 5 bagels, drink tea, odd banana.

Evening main meal of anything really, bowl of cornflakes. Odd fruitgum or boiled sweet. 

07/09/2012 at 00:14

Sorry to be a stir it up but I don't think there's such a thing as a standard or "right" runners' diet.  What matters is that you are getting enough calories to cover your workouts, that you get protein and carbs in preferably within 15-30 mins of hard sessions, and that you generally feel like you have moderate-high energy levels.  Remember there's also more to carbs than pasta as a couple of posts above have pointed out.  Pasta is the heaviest, stodgiest food around IMO and I never have it; rice etc. are less stodgy alternatives.  Try different diets and see what works for you.

07/09/2012 at 10:46
strunner wrote (see)

Sorry to be a stir it up but I don't think there's such a thing as a standard or "right" runners' diet.  What matters is that you are getting enough calories to cover your workouts, that you get protein and carbs in preferably within 15-30 mins of hard sessions, and that you generally feel like you have moderate-high energy levels.  Remember there's also more to carbs than pasta as a couple of posts above have pointed out.  Pasta is the heaviest, stodgiest food around IMO and I never have it; rice etc. are less stodgy alternatives.  Try different diets and see what works for you.

strunner i agree with you that there is no "right diet" for runners. its become aparrent that some on these forums dont like living off pasta, fairenough, but some swear by it, like you i find rice a better alternative.

i`m a bit sceptical though about the whole 15-30min thing where your body absorbs extra carbs or whatever. i dont disbelieve that there is a benefit to it, but i cant help wondering if the advantages of this method are exagerated to the point where people think there messing things up if they were to wait an hour or so. in my experience its actually pretty difficult to get proper nutrition within 15mins unless you prepare food before your run maybe.

07/09/2012 at 11:38

I just eat normal food in reasonable sized portions and try to avoid fast food, fried food and too many cakes and sweeties. I also avoid 'sports' and energy drinks like they were the plague.

Breakfasts: porridge with dried fruit, wholemeal toast with sardines or peanut butter or honey, low sugar cereal and/or muesli with semi skimmed milk.

Lunches: sandwiches and/or soup - the Baxters 'stay full' range is pretty good.

Dinners: hot pasta with sauces, cold pasta salads, stir fries with loads of veggies and brown rice, meat stews and/or casseroles with loads of veggies.

Snacks: bananas, apples, yoghurts, tinned fish, fruit ice lollies, kiddie sized chocolate bars and the occasional packet of crisps.

For me, watching my weight is all about portion size and controlling mindless snacking. If I feel peckish but I know it's just boredom and not real hunger, I have a cup of tea.

 

 

07/09/2012 at 21:00

Andy - agree with you, getting food in quickly is not the (or even one of the) most important elements of training.  For practicality I eat some oatcakes and have a glass of milk (so carbs and protein) as soon as I get in from a harder run / cross-training session.  I find the milk settles my stomach too (which is weird as it seriously upsets it before any exercise...!).

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