heart-rate-facts

15 messages
12/08/2013 at 19:22

Hi all !! I have a question for professional runners. I am 90 kgs 6.1 ft. I have been running for the last 6 months for at least 3 times a week followed by some basic weight training and fitness training.

But since last week, I have started monitoring my heart rate as my trainer pointed out that it was extremely high 180 BPM. I have been comfortably able to run up to 1 hour at a speed of 10.1 Kmph. But normally I only run 30 mins 4.8 - 5 kms but ever since that day I haven’t been running for long as even with mild running at 8kmph for 5 mins my heart goes to 165 and then I have to reduce the speed and at the end of the work out I feel I haven’t done anything. 

Please suggest what is a good maximum heart rate to train at ? and how to bring my high heart rate down. At an run of 11kmph within 2 mins my heart rate would jump to 180 or above can’t help thinking that if I do HIIT it will touch 200 or above. Maybe I have to give up running L

 

Please advise..

Thnaks

12/08/2013 at 19:35
Has your trainer worked out your maximum heart rate properly or are they just using the 220 minus your age?

My heart rate always spikes at the start of a run but soon settles down after a couple of miles.
12/08/2013 at 19:53

What Millay said/ it will go up quickly as it gets a big behind and then god to catch up,

tty walking and building up waking pace slowly until you can't get the heart rate any higher without jogging, then floflows low as is comfy and then ease into your natural pace over a 10- 15 mins and it should not be so rapid. Some of us just Beat high  because we are used to only ever working flat out. some gentler training will help your lower intensity fitness Even though it will feel alien at first!!

12/08/2013 at 20:02

Your fears that your heart will explode are unfounded.

At maximum rates the blood flow through the heart becomes turbulent and less effective at shifting oxygen.

Less oxygen means onset of oxygen debt, which means lactic acid, which will make you slow down wether you like it or not.

Thats natures safety valve.

You cannot over-ride it.

12/08/2013 at 20:38

Thanks ya'll, and I am sorry I missed mentioning my age- 32 and I do have a slight High BP problem. 

Milllsy1977 - He is just using the 220 minus- age formula. 220-32 = 188 BPM

I easily touch 181 but I don’t feel worked out altall rather I feel I could run for an hour or more on at that speed, let’s say for the sake of argument 9.2Kmph. 

Flob I will try brisk walks in the beginning to help lower the heart rate or maybe RICF said just forget about it and run until I get breathless..  I have read your earlier posts, I have to start training for the half marathon coming this December and my target time is 1:45 do you think its too ambitions ? And will a high MHR effect the run ? 

 

 

12/08/2013 at 20:46
You need to speak to your trainer and ask him or her to give you a proper max heart rate test. Then you have something solid to go on.
You have plenty of time to train for the race just don't try and run every run flat out.
12/08/2013 at 22:10

You need to get another trainer, as your current one is an idiot if he thinks 220-age is at all appropriate way of determining max HR

12/08/2013 at 22:51

Put your heart rate monitor on have a nice gentle the for a mile then run up the steepest hill you can find as fast as you possibly can until you can't run anymore. Whatever your heart rate gets up to is (within a couple of beats) your max heart rate. Use that instead of 220 - age

12/08/2013 at 23:32

I did 4 k of steady on flat ground to warm up and then an all out 1k up a steady hill and it turned out that I reached my max just before the top of the hill.  the 5 k jog home before looking at the stats was torturous!! at least I know my max, which is as near as dam it, the same as mosIFAD the estimated answers.

13/08/2013 at 10:24

@ Luke Brown4 , how long do I run or try to run at the steepest hill 60 Secs ? 

13/08/2013 at 13:37

I'm not lukebrown but-

it is until you have to stop- as in you MAX out. A thorough warm up prior to the all out will reduce injury risks and also help tire you out a bit, which helps push up your bpm.

 

WiB
13/08/2013 at 13:44

I wouldnt worry about it. As long as its beating you are ok.

WiB
13/08/2013 at 18:49

Thank you all !!

13/08/2013 at 19:40

Normal distance training should feel so easy your lungs almost never come into the equation. If they do, you're putting in too much effort.

As for high heart rate. Its the high rate that shifts the most blood/oxygen around the system.

Chris Boardman said his racing days were numbered when he found couldn't hold a heart rate in the mid 190's any longer.

18/08/2013 at 09:14

Karry slightly different view but have you checked out the actual HRM. Until I recently changed my strap my rate use to go up to 160/170 for the first 5/10 minutes and then would drop down to normal. I found this blog on the internet http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2010/04/troubleshooting-your-heart-rate.html

and changed my garmin strap to a polar one as he suggests and now get a correct reading from the start.


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