Orthotic advice

9 messages
17/06/2003 at 14:30
Anyone have any advice on orthoses and clinics. Currently been prescribed Vectorthotics by my osteopath and not convinced they are right.
17/06/2003 at 15:19
Not sure what Vectorthotics are but the best route by far is to see a chiropodist and get your orthotics made to measure - off-the-shelf ones (like they sell in Boots) are of dubious value I think as everyone's biomechanical weirdnesses are different! I got referred to chiropodist by my GP for plantar fasciitis and my orthotics were free. They have absolutely saved my (running) life.

I recently had to look for a new chiropodist as my orthotics needed repairing and I'd moved house. I picked a registered one out of the yellow pages who said he specialised in sports injuries. He's been great. But I'd recommend the GP route as a first off, not least because orthotics are expensive (£150+) if you get them made privately.

Good luck!
17/06/2003 at 18:25
i have vectorthotics, they are the ones with little clippy-in bits to adjust to different levels of pronation, aren't they? maybe the adjustable bits have been set to the wrong levels? I am very pleased with mine so far.

I would go back to the osteopath if I were you - if they haven't given you the right orthotics then they should replace them for you free of charge, shouldn't they? not fit for the purpose they were supplied for and all that?
30/06/2003 at 14:21
Thanks both, I've now had my feet cast for prescription orthotics and am waiting for them to arrive. I did pay privately, but I've been injured now for 18 months and am so desperate to get back. I've spent a small fortune over the last year anyway, so whats a few hundred more quid!!! Will try to sell the vectorthotics back to my osetopath.
30/06/2003 at 16:04
Good luck Mitch! Hope your new orthotics bring you running pleasure again... Interestingly I've just had a really fascinating sesh with a great sports physio who has given me exercises to try and correct some of the weird things my legs do... she reckons that in combination with the orthotics this could make a big difference. Worth considering going along once you get your orthotics (a two-pronged approach!)
30/06/2003 at 18:17
Just got my orthotics (presribed by a podiatrist) and they are wonderful. Not the cheapest things in the world but are having a big impact.
23/08/2006 at 11:22
I was wondering if anyone has had experience with Vectorthotics since earlier posts on this thread.

I had mine fitted by a physio who specialises in these things about a week ago, and they're not proving easy to get used to.

They have the 4 degree wedges at the front, and no wedges under the heel.

So far, I've been running very short distances (a mile or two), and walking around at home with them... but they still feel like golf balls in my shoes and have also caused blisters where the front wedge now pushes the insole against my arch.

I'm more than happy to persevere if in time I'll get used to them, and they cure the shin splints that have cursed my running for years, but I'd be grateful for any idea of what the likely timescales might be.

Thanks!
23/08/2006 at 21:04
ChrisA, re: your blisters...

When I started running with my orthotics I had outrageous blisters on the soles of both my feet under the arches. My podiatrist gave me insoles to wear on top of them, cut out of ?neoprene? (a rubbery material with a fabric top) which solved the problem. I guess any fabric insole would have the same result so long as it isn't the cheap type that shrinks and balls up under the foot.

Can't comment on Vectorthotics as never heard of them. Mine came privately, and were comfy to run in from the off (except for the blisters :)
23/08/2006 at 22:49
Thanks for this.

For anyone interested, Vectorthotics are a sort of customisable off-the-shelf (rather than custom-made) orthotic.

Norlite stock them:

http://www.norlite.co.uk/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Vectorthotics_6.html

It's an insole, under which is a rigid plastic part that goes from heel to arch, heat-softened then moulded to your arch. It also comes with a selection of wedges of various sizes and angles which are attached underneath.

They're about £30.

Since my earlier post I've pulled the wedges off mine, and I'm going to run with them without wedges for a bit (the rigid bit still provides more anti-pronation rigidity AFAICT, than nothing at all), then go to the 2º wedges for a while before going back to the 4º my physio said I needed.

Hopefully I'll get used to them gradually.

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