Parenting a child with additional needs

Helping them to communicate

21 to 23 of 23 messages
seren nos    pirate
01/08/2012 at 16:35

when they were young i kept on taking them to playgroups and sports centres etc to integrate..even though i always had to stay within a couple of feet of my my eldest so i could read his emotions and sense when he was getting wound up..........so i could try and get him away from the situation before he got too far,....otherwise it was a restraint situation which was never great...........

 

both mine started in mainstream as they had not been diagnosed...............but it had a really crap headmistress............eldest got a one to one quite young as he had behaviour problems in school as he couldn't cope with the routine and the kids..........but when he was 6 we got a diagnose but the headmistress got the diagnosis first and decided to permantently exclude him because she could not cope with autistsic spectrum in the school ( this was 12 years ago)............after a diddicult 5 years ( mixture of permanent exclusions , and individual classrooms ) he ended up in a specialist residential school for  5 years where they did a wonderful job building him up and dealing with his anxieties.............now in mainstream colege , with 2 part time jobs and if you met him you would not know he had any problems underneath now......

youngest came out of mainstream as the headmistress was maiking it difficult even though he wasn't showing the behaviour problems...........in a school with a unit for the rest of primary where he gradually accesssed more mainstream lessons with support.......

now he is going into GCSE year in top set for everything and still has support for when he needs it.which isn't so much...........we visisted 8 comps in the area when we were deciding schools and we chose teh right one...........only disadvantage is its a all boys school..........but apart from theat the school is brillaint in understanding that little things can make a difference to him......

i think that if the youngest hadn't got the bad role model of his eldest brother and had had a more understanding headmistress in his first school.........he would have been fine with mainstream all along...........

its great now that they can access mainstream all the way through comp with one to one support..............i think you really need to look at the schools and the individual child to work out if mainstream or specailist school is the best............i like the schools with the units attached so that teh children can move between the two easily and where the staff have more understanding........

its hard work sometimes getting the support and the schools that they need....but worth the fight in the end when it is right it makes such a difference........

27/10/2012 at 20:26
Well, I am realising that I am going to have a huge battle on my hands. We sorted out an informal visit to the local school with the specialist hearing unit and they were happy to consider taking him. Spoke to his teacher of the deaf ( who is new, never even told me her name) and she said he couldn't go there because he wasn't deaf enough. ARGH!
29/10/2012 at 14:55

Have you tried pursuing the sensory route? There are some charities such as NDCS, Sense and Action on Hearing Loss that may be able to help you generally with advice on developing communication when someone has sensory loss of some sort. And they may be able to help with getting things moving on the care and support side of things also.


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