Stuck

15 messages
27/10/2010 at 08:39
Hi Guy's,
Just a quick question, I seem to have got stuck at a weight of about 11.6 stone, and I'm really struggling to lose any more. At the beginning of the year I was 14 stone, I took up running and never looked back.

I wanted to get to 11 stone or just under, but now I seem to have hit a wall and can't lose any more weight.

Does anyone have any advise or tips on how I can try and lose that last half stone?

I'm running about 15 - 20 miles a week, and I eat pretty sensibly. I'm worried about upping the mileage as I don't want to injure myself.

Any advise is great received.
27/10/2010 at 09:33

Congrats on the weight loss SG .  The thing is EVERYONE I know (who is not overweight) including myself admits they could quite cheerfully lose half a stone........ the last half stone is the hardest bit to lose.  I weight 9 st 6, healthy weight - BMI (such as it is - its a rubbish indicator) is perfect for my height.  I'd like to weigh 9 St and I can drop to 9 St quite easily in 2 weeks by restricting my calorie intake to about 1500 cals per day BUT it always goes back on again.  Its just not worth the stress of constantly monitoring what I eat and it's depressing.  I'd forget the scales if I were you - eat a bit of what you fancy every now and again, excersize and enjoy your life! 

BTW...... upping your mileage by an extra 10% per week over a period of 6 weeks will most likely not injure you.  Trouble is I run 25 - 35 miles per week and still carry my extra half stone......... I think its because I feel I deserve the odd choc bar for being so active

27/10/2010 at 10:07
Hi Tigerlily,

Thanks for the advise, I think I will try and up my mileage a little each week, and see if I can try and shift the extra weight, you never know

Good for you having the odd choc bar, sounds to me like you deserve it
27/10/2010 at 13:45

Don't worry if you don't lose "weight".  As you get smaller, losing weigth becomes much harder as you actually build more muscle, which is heavier than fat. Your fat percentage drops, but you don't see this on basic scales. 

Well done on the weight loss, quite an achievement.

31/10/2010 at 14:41

I agree with the above- it's much harder to get down to your goal weight, than lose weight when you are definiately overweight. Your body seems to have a sort of "set weight" which is very difficult to shift.

There was some very interesting stuff on TV a few months ago where they got some skinny students to deliberately overeat- some put weight on easily, some put on a little, and some just couldn't stomach the food, despite financial incentives. When they stopped the project, most of them just fell back to their pre-existing weight without really trying.

Don't worry about the last 1/2 stone...............keep excercising- I bet you look/ feel much better than you did-with time you'll keep toning up, and look better, even if the scales don't budge.

I've been at the same weight through 4 marathon campaigns, but definitely look like I've lost weight. And I know I'm in much better shape than I would be if I didn't bother.

I suspect that increasing mileage is the key, but difficult, as it just makes you hungry!

Edited: 31/10/2010 at 14:46
31/10/2010 at 16:42
AllNewTB wrote (see)

Don't worry if you don't lose "weight".  As you get smaller, losing weigth becomes much harder as you actually build more muscle, which is heavier than fat. Your fat percentage drops, but you don't see this on basic scales. 

Well done on the weight loss, quite an achievement.

No, as you lose weight, you lose more muscle. It's extremely difficult (and the majority of the time, for the majority of people, impossible) to lose fat without also losing muscle.It's what bodybuilders strive for. See here

What people often think is extra muscle is just more-noticeable muscle-definition due to the removal of surrounding layers of fat.

31/10/2010 at 17:06
Silas wrote (see)
AllNewTB wrote (see)

Don't worry if you don't lose "weight".  As you get smaller, losing weigth becomes much harder as you actually build more muscle, which is heavier than fat. Your fat percentage drops, but you don't see this on basic scales. 

Well done on the weight loss, quite an achievement.

No, as you lose weight, you lose more muscle. It's extremely difficult (and the majority of the time, for the majority of people, impossible) to lose fat without also losing muscle.It's what bodybuilders strive for. See here

What people often think is extra muscle is just more-noticeable muscle-definition due to the removal of surrounding layers of fat.


Why does my "muscle" wobble then? Damn.........
31/10/2010 at 17:42

Good Evening.

Well first of all congratulations on losing your weight.   Unfortunately,  weight loss is never easy.    I know.  I too struggled for a very long time with my weight.  But like you I also took up running.  Running is an extremely efficient way to burn calories and drop pounds.    80% of your physique is result of what you eat.  20% is exercise.  So you will also need to eat a healthy balanced diet too.  And by combining the two together the results can be amazing.  I managed to lose 52lbs.  This was just over 7 years ago and I have since then been able to maintain my weight ease. 

So try to eat balanced, lower fat diet with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables.  Try to keep an eye on your portion sizes.  And make sure you LIMIT the amount of certain foods such as, Junk foods, ready made processed meals (the ones you buy in the supermarket), alcohol and takeaway foods.  These are all very high in refined sugar and full of saturated fat.  The two main ingredients which are responsible for that extra weight gain.

Try to sit down to eat your meals, take time over them and pay particular attention to what you are eating.

A common eating mistake among runners is that they can often overcompensate for the calories burned by exercise with extra calories from more food and beverages.  This is why some runners find that they even gain weight.  Despite their regular training.  One way to prevent "stealth calorie" comsumption is to write everything you're eating in a journal for a few weeks.  Quite often just seeing a record of your food intake will help you see where your diet needs improvement.  This I found this really worked for me.  It helped to keep me on track.  As this way it made me think twice before putting that extra chocolate bar in my mouth.

So be patient and don't give up.  Try to be as consistent and committed as you can.  I wish you lots of success and let us know how you are getting on.

31/10/2010 at 17:57
Silas - you've misunderstood. The point I was making is that if you're exercising and eating healthily, you might not lose weight but you will lose inches and fat.  It is absolutely possible to lose fat and gain muscle. I had this conversation with my doctor last month and since then I've been measuring my body fat percentage, which is definitely dropping while my weight is static.
31/10/2010 at 18:48

AllNewTB,

I don't think it's impossible, but I believe it's very unlikely. It's even more unlikely for this to happen week after week. The problem is that to lose fat you need to take in less energy (i.e. fewer calories) than your body requires, whereas to gain muscle you need to take in more energy (more calories) than your body requires.

However, I've been having a bit of a browse and most bodybuilders accept that fat loss with muscle gain, while rare, does sometimes happen with "beginners" (those new to weight training), so maybe that's what you're experiencing. Are you doing any weight training (or something similar) and eating a high-protein diet? If not, I suspect that either your means of determining BF% and/or BW are imperfect and the lack of weight loss is for some other reason.

For example, I'm pretty sure I could gain weight while losing inches around my waist, but it would have nothing to do with me gaining muscle. I'd do it by eating fewer calories than required, loading with creatine monohydrate and drinking as much water as possible before I weighed myself.

31/10/2010 at 20:16
I'm not body building, I'm running.  My husband is a former PT, with a sports-based degree and he says it's perfectly usual to not lose weight but to lose size.
31/10/2010 at 21:32
I didn't assume you were body building. I asked if you were doing weight training and eating a high protein diet because both are pretty much essential for somebody maximising fat loss while minimising muscle loss. And I keep referring to bodybuilders because their primary goal is to gain muscle and lose fat, so input from that community and consideration of how they achieve their goals is relevant.

01/11/2010 at 14:19
Hi Guy's,

Thanks for the advise. I've been trying to keep an eye on what I'm eating, I don't drink or smoke, I rarely ever eat chocolate or sweets, although I do have a slight weakness for salted peanut's, which I'm sure is not helping

My mileage has only been around 15 or 16 miles a week, but I am going to start upping that to around 25 - 30 miles per week over the next 4 - 6 weeks, and I'll see how that goes.

If you've got any good substitutes for replacing the peanut's, I'm happy to give it a go.

Thanks again guy's

01/11/2010 at 14:41
Almonds - they contain stuff that helps your joints cope with running. I'm asthmatic so have to avoid peanuts, I've swapped to almonds. I even have almond butter instead of peanut butter.
01/11/2010 at 15:34
Thanks AllnewTB,

Actually, I've tried the Almond butter, and that's not bad. I think I'll give the actual almonds a try as well then.


We'd love you to add a comment! Please login or take half a minute to register as a free member
15 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW Forums