Bare minimum training

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19/03/2013 at 08:00

As i prepare for my first marathon, and clock in the long runs etc, there is always those doing the bare minimum training. There is a girl at work, she is just doing a max of 7 miles at the moment, and only once a twice a week, and sometimes a week goes by with no training. She is doing the London in 5 weeks, and just said, oh, i will walk it, will be alright.

Has anyone else heard stories about people, who think they can just breeze through a marathon, and what were the end results?

cougie    pirate
19/03/2013 at 08:28
There was the karate dude who did London at short notice. Something like 4 weeks to go or so ? We told him it was silly but he got quite aggressive with us over it. He took something like six and a half hours - which is basically a walking time. He's not been back since.

You get out of running what you put in. Crap training = crap times.
19/03/2013 at 09:57

This forum sometimes gives the appearance of being populated with hoards of people who have somehow found themselves signed up for a marathon.

I didn't bother using the term 'run' because its quite clear that so many of the participants aren't runners to start with. Never were, never will be.

Sometimes its difficult to work out who is right. The posters who want a solution to the fact that despite never having run as far as 10 miles in training still want someone to 'up-load' them a solution. Or the other posters who just tell them the truth.

19/03/2013 at 10:13
A lot of the woefully undertrained guys come on here looking for advice and then often get offended and upset when they get an honest response from a number of very experienced runners.
19/03/2013 at 10:35

I've never run a marathon (I'm 44). I think I might one day but first I'd like to hit some PBs at the shorter distances.

I started running again though to get fast and run a PB at Half Marathon distance.

However I have found that running 4 times a week has a lot of associated benefits.

Other than just after a hard run race I feel a lot better and more 'ready for action' (general and working life).

Everything that involves a level of exertion is easier.

My sex life and my own performance is better.

I look healthier.

I've never been overweight but I am sure I would have seen benefits here too if I had been.

I have given my life a sense of purpose that work simply never has - before running again the thought of getting up before 7.30am was appalling - now I have got up, run 6-8 miles, walked the dog for two miles, stretched and had a shower by 8am three days a week plus I run at weekends too.

This has also had the benefit of downgrading the importance of work in my life which has made me feel less stressed generally.

Those people who enter a marathon for the sake of ticking the marathon box are missing out - big time! The real joy of running and how it makes you feel should be the by product of entering a marathon - if you don't do the running you don't only not enjoy the feeling of achievement on the day but miss out on all the associated joy too.

So don't be jealous of the people doing no training - they are the ones missing out.

 

19/03/2013 at 10:36

I was woefully undertrained for 2 marathons last year.  Not quite as bad as running a max of 7 miles once a week!  I knew I was undertrained, but I didn't appreciate just how much undertrained I was.  I finished my first marathon in 4:48 and my second in 4:24.  I was hoping for a sub 4 marathon last year, but realised that I just hadn't put the miles in.

I wasn't a "runner" last year - definitely not.  I would class myself as a runner now though - I've started to train 6 times a week (3 of them running days, 2 cycling and 1 strength/weights/stretching - all geared at improving running performance) and I'm enjoying it for the first time in my life!

On the second marathon I did last year, I had a mate who turned up to run the same marathon and his training was ridiculously low.  He cycles to work every day (12 mile round trip) but didn't start "training" for the marathon until about 6 weeks before hand.  He got one 20 mile run in (with a couple of 10 minute breaks in the middle) and a few other runs, but really nothing like marathon training.  He went out aiming for 3:30!!  I wished him luck but secretly thought I'd be passing him at about 15 miles or so reduced to a gibbering wreck.

I "sprinted" in at 4:24 - greeted by a stiff-legged (but fresh-faced) mate who then told me he finished in 3:32.  I couldn't believe it.  He's either a liar (in that he trained way more than he told me) or has excellent natural ability - I genuinely think it's the latter.

I'm hoping to beat him in a half marathon in May to put things right 

19/03/2013 at 10:38

I was out with me mates last night and got trollied. I woke up today to find I had signed up for the ByEckItsHilly Marathon. I've got 4 weeks to train. I do a bit of weights stuff in front of the mirror so am quite fit. Any advice? aiming for 4 hours.

19/03/2013 at 10:39

I have a marathon in 7 weeks and have done bugger all training ......... whats the worse that can go wrong??

 Not only that but I plan to prove that the 'wall' doesnt exist by never going further than 18 miles in training

Wish me luck!

 

Edited: 19/03/2013 at 10:40
19/03/2013 at 10:42

Calum... if I had a mate who did that, I'm not sure he'd be my mate any more !

19/03/2013 at 10:46

Indeed - I don't see him often.  He's my wife's mate's partner and they live in a different part of the country.  So, yeah, the first time I'd seen him for months he was completely p*ssing all over my marathon effort... by putting in less effort himself!

I'll probably smash my half marathon time in May but he'll cruise to the finish 5 minutes quicker than me even though he hasn't properly trained for it...

19/03/2013 at 10:51

ghostrider, it doesn't sound like your colleague is going to breeze through the marathon at all, in fact walking 26.2 miles will be boring as hell. congratulate yourself on training so that you can make it round in under 8 hours.

19/03/2013 at 10:59

Whatever happened to that guy who was going to do all his marathon training on the Concept II indoor rower?!    (Silly question really...)

19/03/2013 at 11:01
PhilPub wrote (see)

Whatever happened to that guy who was going to do all his marathon training on the Concept II indoor rower?!    (Silly question really...)

I changed usernames Phil

 

19/03/2013 at 11:02

like it or not, the marathon, and especially the London marathon is a hugely popular event that attracts people who would otherwise not run, and perhaps once they complete it, and tick it off their bucket list, will never run again. I don't see the point in being annoyed with them, they just have a different perspective on this event.

There are plenty of experiences I would like to have, but I don't feel a need to become absorbed in the activity to do so. I've done a couple of short, shallow SCUBA dives, and I've tried sea kayaking, both of which I found really enjoyable, but I didn't rush out and buy a wetsuit or a kayak, because they were just standalone experiences, not something I want to make part of my regular day-to-day life.

You can't just rock up and "race" a marathon if you're a non runner who is doing it for the craic, but you can complete it with a bare minimum of preparation, pat yourself on the back, and go on living your life. And that's fine with me.

19/03/2013 at 11:04

Sage advice Agent Ginger.

 

19/03/2013 at 11:12

Indeed, that's a very well-put argument ginger. Good analogies too.

 

19/03/2013 at 11:36
Skinny Fetish Fan wrote (see)

I've never run a marathon (I'm 44). I think I might one day but first I'd like to hit some PBs at the shorter distances.

I started running again though to get fast and run a PB at Half Marathon distance.

However I have found that running 4 times a week has a lot of associated benefits.

Other than just after a hard run race I feel a lot better and more 'ready for action' (general and working life).

Everything that involves a level of exertion is easier.

My sex life and my own performance is better.

I look healthier.

I've never been overweight but I am sure I would have seen benefits here too if I had been.

I have given my life a sense of purpose that work simply never has - before running again the thought of getting up before 7.30am was appalling - now I have got up, run 6-8 miles, walked the dog for two miles, stretched and had a shower by 8am three days a week plus I run at weekends too.

This has also had the benefit of downgrading the importance of work in my life which has made me feel less stressed generally.

Those people who enter a marathon for the sake of ticking the marathon box are missing out - big time! The real joy of running and how it makes you feel should be the by product of entering a marathon - if you don't do the running you don't only not enjoy the feeling of achievement on the day but miss out on all the associated joy too.

So don't be jealous of the people doing no training - they are the ones missing out.

 

Man I couldnt have said it better   ...apart from the sex bit    I too do the same [injured at the mo though, bad advice from 2 physio's!] get up early love the run - try and find nice spots when I go on hols.

At 44 I think what the heck just go out and enjoy it, but I do train  ... though I make sure the run is the most imortant thing and that I can say at the end of every session it was enjoyable.

People who go through life trying to get away with doing the minimum to tick boxes are the real losers - shame for them!

19/03/2013 at 11:50
Millsy1977 wrote (see)
A lot of the woefully undertrained guys come on here looking for advice and then often get offended and upset when they get an honest response from a number of very experienced runners.

I think to be scrupulously fair, the 'honest' responses range from the downright rude or throwaway comment ('enjoy your walk') to the helpful and positive. I'm not surprised some people get upset if people simply laugh at them. Yes, they need to be told but there are ways and ways of doing so.

19/03/2013 at 11:56

I disagree there Pete ........ This is the internet, where you get people from all walks of life ..... and some people are blunt, I dont get why everyone always has to be nicey nice to everyone on forums.

Sometimes a harsh blunt response is needed to get the message home.

It also builds character ....... 

19/03/2013 at 12:28

In that case... enjoy your walk, David!

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