Half Marathon 4 week schedule

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12/10/2005 at 15:27
Having just completed the 10k 4 week schedule, with a pb time in a local 10K, I now have a half marathon to look forward to in 4 weeks time. My last half marathon was 90 minutes (a couple of years ago) after 3 or 4 11-13 mile runs over the 2 weeks leading up to the race. I can only train 3 times a week due to time constraints (hence the 10K schedule was great), and have no real problem with going the distance - what I need is a similar schedule to the 10K one but for the half marathon. The half marathon schedule shown on this site is a 10 weeek plan, training at short distances (rarely over 10 miles)and almost every day. How should I train in order to lower my previous time of 90 minutes? Is there a half marathon 4 week schedule?
13/10/2005 at 12:04
NO!

Just carry on with your 10K schedule & hope for the best!
17/10/2005 at 14:41
Hope for the best?? I've just completed the first week of preparation for my half marathon - this consisted of a 12.5K combination of jog/fast run as per the reccommended 10K plan from this site (Tuesday), followed by a 13 mile run with some 100m strides (Friday) in about 90 mins, then a slower 13 mile run (Sunday) in about 95 mins. Is this too much - I understand the need for speed work, but at the same time think that you need to get the mileage in to get used to covering the distance. If I stick to the 10K plan, with no longer runs, I'm concerned when it gets to the race I will fun the first 10K in good time but then tail off for the rest of the run due to lack of stamina. The one thing I will do is taper in the last week doing no more than 10K runs at the end. This is my plan from an amateurs point of view - how does this sound?
17/10/2005 at 14:48
If your last half was 90 mins, and on Friday you did a 13 mile run in 90 mins, the I don't think you need worry too much about beating your previous best.

You obviously have the aerobic stamina, so if you are looking to do a much better time, I think, given that you only have 4 weeks, then 10 mile long runs, trying to do negative splits, would be the best bet.

Also, use some of your runs to practice pace, so that you don't set off too fast, and bomb out. On race day, *really* concentrate on holding a bit back in the first 5 miles, then you should have enough left for a faster finish.

Good luck!


(Although I admit Big Tim is a much faster, much more experienced runner than I will ever be, so his advice is probably well worth listening to!)
17/10/2005 at 17:12
I would advocate running your long run over distance - i.e. about 14-16 miles. This will build stamina and enable you to run the 13.1 comfortably having gone further than that in training. During the build-up to the London Marathon this year I ran a half-marathon PB on a Sunday sandwiched in between two Sundays on which I ran 20 mile training runs. The PB was effortless as I'd run so much further the week before that it felt like a short run.

I'd also make sure you do a tempo run of about 5-6 miles during the week just to get some faster stuff in. The third session should probably be a longish run, say 8 miles, and you could make it a fartlek-type run with some fast bursts in the middle, after a long warm-up and a good cool-down afterwards.
18/10/2005 at 10:35
OK guys, thanks for the advice. I think I will try to mix in a bit of everything that has been suggested. Maybe the tempo part one day, 10 mile/negative split another and a 13-14 miler on top. I'll also check some of the other threads that seem to cover a similar topic (should have tried this first!) Thanks again - I'll let you know how I get on.
07/11/2005 at 14:42
Well, completed the Stevenage HM in 1:22:02, very happy in the pouring rain. 4 week plan went well, so I'm going to carry on with the training for another HM towards the end of November.
27/11/2005 at 13:04
I want to run my first half marathon in march. I work offshore on a two weeks on and two weeks off rota.My two weeks onshore is great for training but how can I keep up the momentum when I`m offshore? I work very long hours (05.00 AM - 20.00 PM and I`m usually too tired to go to the running machine after that or it is too busy. Any sugestions?
28/11/2005 at 11:59
Motivating yourself after a long day at work is hard - I work in Sweden 06:00 - 20:30 Monday to Thursday, and it is dark cold and wet when I go running, but the feeling afterwards is worth it. Seems you have no opportunity to run outdoors at all when you are at work, but if there is a treadmill - use it! If you have entered yourself for the race, this should be enough to make you want to train, I know it certainly is for me. Sheer panic as the race looms closer gives me the energy to get out and do it! It also feels like I am training for something rather than just trying to keep fit. I'm no expert, but treadmill mileage, although no substitute for the real thing, has got to be better than nothing.
01/12/2005 at 05:23
Thanks Mark, although I do occasionally get on the tread mill I feel that half an hour is long enough before boredom along with tiredness sets in. Is this enough to get on with before I get home?
01/12/2005 at 09:44
Have you tried anything to relieve the boredom? MP3 player, radio, talking books? I don't often do long runs on my own but when I do I find a radio play recorded onto MP3 makes the time fly by.
01/12/2005 at 11:00
I don't suffer that much from boredom - long runs are a great way of clearing your head. Plus, as it is supposed to be training for a specific goal ie half marathon, then you should be focusing on the running, times, split etc. If you break it down in to smaller parts mentally it makes it easier. That's why I always register in advance for a race to get the motivation going! I bet you won't be bored during the race, so treat your training as a race with yourself. Also set yourself distances to run rather than times, and if you run quicker, the time will really fly by!
01/12/2005 at 18:56
This is the sort of training I used for my 10K runs of which I did quite well. PB44 minutes.I am 49 and have only been running since a year past October but I feel I can do better.
As this is a half marathon, which I have registered for in march, would the same training be sufice until I get home for my long runs? I do about 40 miles a week when I`m at home to try to make up. Should I be trying to make up?
I have never tried radio play on MP3 but I shall. Thanks for the good advice.
02/12/2005 at 11:02
One of the guys on this thread told me to continue my 10K training for the HM and hope for the best (4 week 10K schedule from this site) I ended up doing a bit of everything, basically 1 speed session (about 12K) one 11 miler with negative split and 1 13-14 mile run as fast as was comfortable. So basically 3 runs a week (total about 30+ miles)Tuesday, Friday, Sunday for 4 weeks. This gave good results. I'm no expert, but maybe you could do your 2 weeks away as 2 45 min speed sessions and a longer run per week, and then do your longer runs for endurance when you get home. The speed sessions really make a difference. Don't worry about making up, just do what you can!
02/12/2005 at 12:08
I think this is good advice Mark and have read the other threads which gave a lot of guiding. I shall put this to good use and I thank you and Mister W for your support. Good luck to you both in the future and I look foreward to my first 1.30 half.

07/01/2006 at 23:40
I too have entered for my first HM in March (Inverness) so will take note of all the advice I can get...
An experienced runner colleague suggested that I should get a Heart Rate Monitor to train more effectively. Can anyone point me in the direction of any articles/threads/advice for using one?
I'm off to google for plays on mp3...
10/01/2006 at 17:38
Hi

I have just entered the paris half marathon. My pB for a half is 1:53, so hoping to go sub 1:50 for the paris half.
Is anybody doing the paris half? (5/3/06)

Would anyone suggest any warm up races prior to that? or just training?
10/01/2006 at 18:13
If you can get in a 10K race a few weeks before you go that would be good - it certainly improved my speed for the HM race. Also its good preparation just to get your race day routine sorted (when/what to eat, when to start warm up etc.)so there's no last minute nerves and everything will start smoothly. I also tapered my last week of training before the HM so as to be fresh for the big day.
11/01/2006 at 17:38
Thanks for the suggestion Mark Vaughn 4. I am considering a late feb 10km run to get the race day nerves out of the way.

23/10/2006 at 11:47
This will be my second half marathon. last year's half was well worth the trip from Dublin. I trained for about 12 weeks last time and did more endurance training rather than speed. Felt that i didn't push myself enough (2 hrs 7 mins?), i was afraid to overdo it, still had some energy when i was finished, is this a good thing? i'm off to get a heart monitor, think that will help.
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