Heart rate monitor training

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20/06/2006 at 14:32
bb no it shouldn't take years but remember you also have to do hard sessions each week. 70% HR runs are base training. Are you sure your calculating your 70% HR correctly?
20/06/2006 at 14:40
I had tried a self test and got up to max 192. I calculate it using the WHR formula. I have now joined a local running group so i treat that as my trmpo run. with the remainder being easy runs.
20/06/2006 at 15:03
bb you should probably try at least 2 hard sessions a week. what is your speed at 192 HR? and what is your resting HR?
20/06/2006 at 15:31
speed at 192 is c6.0mph. Resting heart rate reduced from 62 7 weeks ago to 57.
Dex
20/06/2006 at 15:48
Paininthefoot

I was doing about 30-40 miles a week, but took advantage of all the easy miles to increase my weekly mileage and now do 50-60 miles per week.

I guess that the more aerobic training you do the more you push your body to make the physiological changes it needs to make. The more aerobic training you do, the more you push your body to make the adaptations it needs to make I suppose.

My long runs over recent weeks have been in the 15-18 mile range, up to about 2hours 30 minutes or so. I tell myself that otherwise I'd just be at home in front of the tv.

I haven't really done a lot of speedwork to be honest, not yet anyway, I go out with my club to the track on a Monday night, although I've missed a couple of sessions due to work over the last few weeks. And again, on Thursday night, which I look at as a Threshold Floor run. All my own training is then at Recovery Ceiling pace. Race Pace for my last Half Marathon was 8.09min/mile but I took it really easy and could have done about 7.30min/mile if I made more of an effort. I haven't really pushed myself in any race recently, and I'm curious as to what I could do myself.

Heres a link to my Motionbased On-Line logbook if you want to have a look at my runs. Running Log

I probably need to do some speedwork to make the most of it, I'm taking it easy this week as I'm running the North Downs Run which is 30k of hills and 80% track and trail I believe, so probably not a good race to judge what a potential road race pace might be.

I do feel stronger though, when I do a speed session, so I guess something is working ;-)

Dex.

20/06/2006 at 16:09
Dex,

Thanks for that. I guess if you can average 8:15 min/miles at 70% you easily be able to better that half marathon pace.

I've just found this and he's suggesting that if you can run 8:00 min/miles you can do 6:30 min/miles for 5k so sounds like you could go quite a lot faster.

That North Downs 30k looks a tough one good luck with it.

20/06/2006 at 16:23
Wore my HR monitor at a race at the w/e. Surprised myself by maintaining an ave HR of 171 over 39min. Not bad for a 41yo pretty hard going for the last few min!
Based on this I estimate my LT to be around 165, so I now need to adjust my training paces.
21/06/2006 at 10:33
bb so your 70% max is 151.5 yes? The fact that your resting heartrate has dropped is a good sign of improved C.V fitness. Maybe worth trying another max HR soon. In theory this shouldn't change too much I would also expect that 6mph (unless uphill) wouldn't give a max HR.
21/06/2006 at 13:28
groovy - yes that is the 70% number I am working to. What do you think is the best way for me to do a self test on a tredmill to redetermine my max HR?
21/06/2006 at 14:59
I'm not brilliant at these I have to be honest. If your on a treadmill then the best way is to run a speed session. So warm up as usual then do three speed sessions for 2 mins each with 45 second recovery between each. Speed will depend on you but if you get 192 at 6mph I'd try 7 or 7.5mph.The trick is to be absolutely knackered at the end of the 3rd session. If your monitor will record your HR to check later then you wont need to worry about keeping a check on it yourself. If not then look at the thing pretty frequently especially during the 3rd rep. Also keep an eye on it for around 30 secs after the final rep as HR may still go up after you finish. If you feel that you could have done more then you could try another rep or twoo or just redo the test after a couple of days at higher speed
21/06/2006 at 15:59
Groovy

Many thanks will try this at the weekend when refreshed. Did a hard run last night.
26/06/2006 at 11:23
I would appreciate some advice about racing with a HRM.

Since the winter I have spent several months base training, and I have found that my heart rate in training has dropped considrably, and I am now running at the same pace as a year ago, but with a rate 15 bpm lower. This in in training.

I have run two half marathons recently and I have found two things:

1 - I am racing at a far higher heart rate than in training. Even in a gentle jog at the start to get warmed up before the race my heart rate is probably 10-15 bpm faster than normal. This repeats itself in the race when I am running at a much higher bpm than in training. Yet I seem to have no ill effects, I can maintain the pace and rate fairly consistently (although I have slowed a little in the later stages that was because in both races the last few miles were into a head wind). So should I race at a slower pace, or not worry that my heart rate is so much higher?

2 - I do not train at the heart rates I achieve in races. So should I do some training at these higher rates to improve even more?
26/06/2006 at 11:32
DR - someone more knowledgeable than me will be along to give you a good answer. I have been doing HR training using the Compleat Idiot method now for a couple of months, doing ALL my runs @ 70%.

Yesterday I knocked 30 seconds off my PB, av HR for the race was 91%!

Not sure if this is a good thing or not mind you....
27/06/2006 at 11:26
DR/Hendo. Probably wouldn't worry too much about heartrate in races as I'm sure you want to achieve as good a time as possible. We all learn about going off too fast and dying towards the end of the race and learn from it. Hertrates are almost certainly going to be higher in races due to the adrenalin rush of compeating
27/06/2006 at 12:41
I tried a max test at the weekend. Cor how difficult was it. Previous max was 189 but I am sure I can go higher. However really struggled and couldn't get any higher than 182.

any suggestions anyone?
27/06/2006 at 13:57
Hi - a kind person just pointed me in the direction of this thread, I'd previously asked a question on heart rates in the Beginners forum. You can read that here:

http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/forum/forummessages.asp?dt=4&UTN=84793&V=6&SP=

...has details of me and how I run if you need them.


I'd like to know if my max heart rate of 226 is:

a) Possible. It seems way too high compared to other people, and the ala the forumalas
b) Indicating a health issue. Is is possible to get this high, but only if your heart's about to stop
c) Wrong, and my HRM is not reporting correctly.


Previously my MHR had been 218, and before that 202. I achieved my 226 reading by doing a 5 mile and sprinting the last 200-odd metres. I'm 30 years old and have been running for a coupla of months. I run 3 times a week and do a 3 mile at 8 minutes a mile, and 5 and 7 miles at around 8:30-9 minutes a mile.

I don't run with anybody else that uses a HRM, and although I run in a city centre I'm not sure whether it's near any overheard power lines or not. My brother, who has been running for about a decade, measured his MHR at 202 at the same time I got my initial 202.

Thanks for any help.
27/06/2006 at 16:41
Adam
Does seem high but there are sigificant variations in max HRs.

A bit of common sense. What is your resting heart rate, what is your HR when on a longish run and what is it when you do a hard run. It should ne fairly obvious if 226 was just an abnormal reading.

Do 4 or 5 sprints up a hill and you will get close to your max
27/06/2006 at 18:13
Thanks for your response redkite.

My resting heart rate is 52. On 5 and 7 mile runs, 8:30 a mile, I average around 170 with up to 185 on hills. Working hard on a fast section I'm up to around 195 but I can't sustain this pace for very long (maybe half a mile) and still have enough energy to complete the run.

As I'm a novice when it comes to running and heart rates I can't really apply common sense, or any sense at all, to know if 226 is obviously an abnormal reading based on those figures, as I don't really know what to expect of my heart rates. All I know is that each time I've hit a new max in the last 6 weeks I have felt like I'm pushing it harder than previously, so my percieved work rate has felt harder as I see new maxes.

To me it does seem high based on my limited knowledge, so I was after some more experienced opinions - thanks for yours.
27/06/2006 at 19:21
Adam - back at home now so can answer more fully - are you/were you sure that the reading was consistent and accurate? What I mean by this is that sometimes after I set out and before my chest gets sweaty (and hence improves the contact between strap and skin), my monitor will often read high. I know it's high because I'm beginning to learn what effort = what heart rate. A quick wiggle around of the strap and the true reading appears and becomes constant.

Keep trying and get an idea of what your monitor should read at perceived efforts. Obviously with a pinch of salt because perceived does not necessarily equal actual! Then try a max HR test again.

Lots of people on here swear by the book "heart monitor training for the compleat idiot" by John Parker. This is what he has to say about Max HR:

Your MHR has nothing to do with ability, nothing to do with fitness. It's a matter of genetics and cardiac efficiency. I've known former world record holder with a MHR under 160.. ..on the other hand I've done training runs with average runners who were still able to converse while topping 200!

I think that may ease your concerns?! One other thing that he says is that your MHR does not change, perhaps only a couple of beats as you age. So I would suggest that you just need to test your max more scientifically.

Hope this helps.
27/06/2006 at 19:26
A quick question (I hope).

Over the last 7 weeks, all of my runs have been what Dex calls "Recovery Ceiling" (which for me is <150HR(70%HRR/WHR). I am running 4 times a week, 30 miles per week in total.

In that time (on my 5 mile test course) I have reduced my pace from 9:49/mile to 8:38/mile.

Where do you recommend I go from here?

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