How to increase speed for 10K?

15 messages
10/11/2010 at 07:51
I completed a very hilly HM last week  at 1hr 49mins (hurray! under 1hr 50m), and hvae a 10K race coming up at the end of the month.  This 10K race is relatively flat, and I want to achieve around 45 mins (previously @ 50mins), but would be grateful for advice what training to do in the 2 or so weeks I have left til the race.  Oh, and the race is a big one, so lots of people to try to get around.....THANKS!
10/11/2010 at 09:47

Wow... 50min to 45 min is quite a big jump!   If you make 45min I want to know how cause I've been stuck on 50min for 10k for a few months... I've joined a running club and started doing more intervals (track sessions) and tempo runs as well as increasing mileage on my long run.  I think it's making a difference.  I'm going to have another go to get under 50min next week so we'll see if all the hard work has paid off.

Good luck with your run and let us know how you got on!

13/11/2010 at 19:20

Sorry but there's not much you can do in two weeks that will have any effect on your 10k time. It takes at least 6 to 8 weeks for any changes in training to begin to have an effect.

Your best bet is to keep the training easy so that you have fully recovered from the 1/2m.
JJ

15/11/2010 at 06:01

Try your local ParkRun (http://parkrun.com/) as running fast  for 5km is great preparation for 10km. they are also great fun.

It is also worth checking the race time predictor at http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/racing/rw-calculators/1465.html; you should achieve 49m27s so do  not be disheartened if you fall short of your ambitious target.

Speed and, in particular, speed endurance are the greatest challenge.

29/11/2010 at 01:20
Completed the said 10K yesterday and was quite pleased with a result of 46 mins....however I did find it hard to keep up a fast pace and took around 4 walk breaks during the run.  QUESTION: How do I train my stamina to keep up the pace for 10K and not walk???
Dubai Dave    pirate
29/11/2010 at 05:10

Run training is simple and basically consists of one long run, one tempo run, one set of intervals and two or three aerobic runs a week.  If you are targetting a 10K run and are having to take walk breaks clearly you lack endurance. How long is your present long run and at what pace?

Without knowing anything about your training I would hazard a guess that you need to increase the distance of your long run, increase your weekly mileage and through in some interval sessions to improve your speed. There are thousands of 10K training schedules available or best of all join your local club.

Good luck

29/11/2010 at 12:09

 Thanks DD.

 My longest run is around 17K, and long runs generally around 15K right now, with shorter runs around 8K to 10K. 

 So more long runs, at a slower pace?  And with no walk breaks, right?  I thought it was fine to take walk breaks, but suppose you have to get accustomed to running for longer periods of time. .  What is your opinion on walk breaks??

 OK, shall take this approach for my next race, which is just before Christmas and is a hilly 15K.  Here in Hong Kong it is racing season! 

Dubai Dave    pirate
29/11/2010 at 12:55

Moira

Its racing season here in Dubai too!

Its Ok to take a drinks break on a long run, but personally its grab some water and go again. You should be running your long runs at a slower pace. Without doubt you need to put in some interval sessions it will make you faster absolutely gaurenteed

Any training you do is going to take about 5 -6 weeks to have a effect. Good luck

29/11/2010 at 21:22
Mon77 wrote (see)

Wow... 50min to 45 min is quite a big jump! If you make 45min I want to know

I took 6 mins off my 10k PB (currently 39:25) for the same course the previous year with another PB 4mins behind for a hilly course in between (43:25). It is do-able (depending on your time obviously, taking 5 mins off a 35min 10k is far harder than 50-45) but you have to work hard and target whatever your particular weakness is, yours is obviously endurance. I would suggest that you're either:-

a) running too fast and thus having to stop and walk

b) not doing your longer runs correctly or not doing enough weekly mileage

Just try and get used to pacing yourself so that you don't need walk breaks and go from there.

29/11/2010 at 21:30
Yorkshire Rob wrote (see)
 I would suggest that you're either:-

a) running too fast and thus having to stop and walk


I suspect it's that. 46 mins down from 50 mins is a very good improvement (although you don't say how long ago the 50 was run) and you're obviously throwing yourself around reasonably fast to hit 46 mins while still taking four walking breaks. But generally someone with the fitness that time suggests shouldn't have to take walk breaks, which makes me think you are going out too fast. Do you have splits for your miles/kms?
30/11/2010 at 05:46

I forgot to turn on my timer at the start of the race, but here are my splits (in km):

  104:34204:27304:24404:14504:18604:46704:34804:54904:48

So you can see I am slowing down at the end....My 50 mins was from last season, i.e. beginning of the year.  But I have tried to do more speed sessions, usually on the trreadmill, some fast 800m loops.  But don't seem to be able to sustain a say, 4.30km pace for the whole 10K!  No one ever said running is easy!

Dubai Dave    pirate
30/11/2010 at 06:54

You need endurance runs and speed work, try run 1K intervals at 4:30 min pace with a 2 minute recovery between intervals, start with 4 and build up to 8, then either increase the pace or reduce the recovery period

30/11/2010 at 07:35
Ok, with try!! Cheers!
10/02/2013 at 23:42

While a lot of people set great times with walk breaks (through the drink stations), in my exerience walk breaks in training just lead to mental weakness and the thought that it's "ok" to walk.  Since banishing walk breaks completely in training, I've become mentally tougher in a race - I still long to walk when it hurts, but instead just drop the pace a little and keep going (or if in the last 800m just grit teeth and continue/speed up).

25/03/2013 at 14:36
To challenge your own time, to run by your own... Hill training will increase your confidence and stamina...

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