I don't get out of breath

14 messages
18/02/2013 at 16:09

I'm currently training for the GPW recruitment st helens 10k run, (so far hitting about 50 mins) I've previously done a triathlon and a 5k swim. My question is, that although my breathing and heart rate does increase, I don't get out of breath, for all of these events I simply finished and normal breathing resumed. I think this may have something to do with my swimming breathing, but is it not odd that my muscles are whats holding me back and not my sort of 'endurance' breathing wise. A fellow coach at swimming said that I've built too many slow twitch muscle fibres due to my weights regeime in the gym so my muscles have no stamina. Any ideas anyone? + Yay first post!

cougie    pirate
18/02/2013 at 16:12
Your cardio system is probably far fitter than your running muscles ? So your legs cant keep up with your lungs ?

As you train more - it will come. I dont think its odd at all - isnt it exactly what you'd expect ? You've not trained for running properly so your legs would be the weak point ?
18/02/2013 at 16:15

Yeah that's a very good point actually, I just always imagined my legs would be able to keep up from swimming, cycling, thai boxing etc. But I guess running is a whole new level, I definately notice much more DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) the day after running that anything else!

cougie    pirate
18/02/2013 at 16:20
Oh yes - whole new ball game ! Keep at it though - its just like any other sport - if you're consistent - it improves a lot. And your lungs will be a massive help.
18/02/2013 at 16:22

I think it's lucky that you weren't out of breath, otherwise it would have been difficult to finish either the triathlon or the swim.  I believe if you swim out of breath it's actually called drowning - I used to train quite hard at that.

I'm not sure what your fellow coach studied when he did his physiology part of the coaching course.  Swim 5k and your muscles have no stamina?

If you would like to compare being out of breath, try sprinting up a hill as far as you can, and then keep going.  When you finally stop, call that a 10 on your Exertion scale.  Call 1 a nice walk in the park.  When you swim 5k that's about a 5 approaching a 6 to 7 as you near the end.  Running 10k is about a 6 to 7, maybe hitting 8 in the final k if you've got anything left to give it something.  These are just my own perception of the effort.  But you can see that to finish something that long you don't go flat out all the way.  As you train more you'll get a feel for the pace you can hold for the distance, and therefore be right on the 'no more' point as you reach the finish line.  That'll be when you know you've got it right.

18/02/2013 at 16:25

I hope to hit a straight 10 on my hill sprints session tomorrow! I'm definately going to push myself further for this 10k

18/02/2013 at 16:33

Enjoy the benefits of having a strong aerobic base! It makes sense that your running muscles are the main "limiter" and need to catch up in fitness with your general cardio conditioning.  Not only that, I find even amongst good quality, experienced runners, there is quite a variation in breathing rates at race-pace.  If I breathed as heavily as some people around me in the early stages of a race I think I'd be close to collapsing by halfway!

18/02/2013 at 16:38

For stamina and endurance sport you needs those slow twitch muscle fibres to be well developed. You have either misquoted your coach, or he / she is getting confused. Slow twitch muscle fibres are determined genetically. With training it is possible for some of the fast twitch muscle fibres to take on characteristics of slow twitch fibres.

It's not unusual for your cardio system to be well developed, yet you lack  muscle endurance - that sums me up nicely. Lots of steady mileage will help - no need to bust a gut to develop this.  

18/02/2013 at 16:38

I have a similar thing from a really strong swimming background. Your legs just need to catch up . It's a good thing though- shows you're consistent. When I raced distance swimming events I'd finish a 1500m and not feel particularly out of breath - talked to my coach, and said it's just because you're used to the sustained effort and so it's a good thing.

18/02/2013 at 16:39

Also, out of interest...what 5k swim did you do? Done quite a few 3.8kms now looking for a decent 5k to target.

18/02/2013 at 17:04
runwiththewind wrote (see)

Also, out of interest...what 5k swim did you do? Done quite a few 3.8kms now looking for a decent 5k to target.

Marie Curie swimathon at ashton pool. I know it's not open water But I'm hoping to maybe enter some open water swimming in the near future. Seriously considering 'tough mudder' too.

18/02/2013 at 17:06
Also-ran wrote (see)

For stamina and endurance sport you needs those slow twitch muscle fibres to be well developed. You have either misquoted your coach, or he / she is getting confused. Slow twitch muscle fibres are determined genetically. With training it is possible for some of the fast twitch muscle fibres to take on characteristics of slow twitch fibres.

It's not unusual for your cardio system to be well developed, yet you lack  muscle endurance - that sums me up nicely. Lots of steady mileage will help - no need to bust a gut to develop this.  

Sorry I think I may have misquoted him. The main jist of it was, that because I was doing alot of strongman work (eg 100kg olympic squat) that my muscles were probably used to those sort of exercising than continuous running.

18/02/2013 at 18:08
James Smith 68 wrote (see)
runwiththewind wrote (see)

Also, out of interest...what 5k swim did you do? Done quite a few 3.8kms now looking for a decent 5k to target.

Marie Curie swimathon at ashton pool. I know it's not open water But I'm hoping to maybe enter some open water swimming in the near future. Seriously considering 'tough mudder' too.

Definitely do some open water! Did my first one and now hooked. Also my friends just did tough guy and it looks amazing! They have now all signed up for tough mudder as well

21/02/2013 at 11:50
PhilPub wrote (see)

Enjoy the benefits of having a strong aerobic base! It makes sense that your running muscles are the main "limiter" and need to catch up in fitness with your general cardio conditioning.  Not only that, I find even amongst good quality, experienced runners, there is quite a variation in breathing rates at race-pace.  If I breathed as heavily as some people around me in the early stages of a race I think I'd be close to collapsing by halfway!

Also-ran wrote (see)

It's not unusual for your cardio system to be well developed, yet you lack  muscle endurance - that sums me up nicely. Lots of steady mileage will help - no need to bust a gut to develop this.  

^What they said^

I'm another in this camp - although not from swimming, but from years of football followed by only focussing on running in the last 18 months. My heart rate range and lung capacity have plenty in reserve but strength and endurance in my legs is the limiting factor and takes time and mileage to develop.

It's not unusual for my lungs and heart rate to settle very quickly after a race finish, but my calves will be begging for mercy for hours or days afterwards!


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