Tell me not to do this.

21 to 36 of 36 messages
30/07/2013 at 13:44

Target an autumn half and then a Spring full.  The Half should give you a taste for whether or not you really want to/feel ready for the full distance.  

30/07/2013 at 13:53

I dont understand the general obsession with marathons. The first question anyone asks me is if I have done one, the second when i say No, is are you planning to. The answer there is possibly. They then frown as if to say i am not a real runner. Of course i could 'run' a marathon if i wanted to, like most people, i would just have to do it a lot slower than i would want and risk injury.

I have been running 3 years now and at the point where i can do 50 miles a week without hurting, however i think its better to nail the shorter distances. As Tim says, get comfortable doing halfs and race them properly first. It takes a few of those to really understand what you can do in terms of pacing etc. I just don't really see the point plodding around a marathon just because its the perceived mecca!

30/07/2013 at 15:33

I ran for many years over all distances before  I decided to do a marathon which incidently was Dublin Golden pages Marathon in 1993. It was a two lap course

finishing in O'connell street.  Nine months prior to the race start I decided to stop drinking alcohol and just train religously.  I gradually increased my milage until  by early October I  was up to 26 miles. On race day  I was raring to go!  

Well i got caught up  with a group of runners going slightly faster than what i was ready for and by 15 miles i think i was crying .  The last 11 miles were pretty dire but I carried on vowing never to run another marathon!  

  The point being, you really need to train properly over a good time period ( nine months plus  in my opinion.  )  if you want to go into a marathon with confidence.

Then you need to stick to a race plan or you'll blow up. It's  a great learning curve and I wish you all the best .  

 

 

30/07/2013 at 19:28

 

Screamapillar wrote (see)
RicF wrote (see)

I'm afraid I come from a running background where taking on marathons were the preserve of athletes with about 10 years training behind them.

Now its just another item on an idiots bucket list.

Bit rude don't you think? The guy wants to give a go, who are you to call him an idiot? 

I didn't. And bucket list item wasn't mentioned by the OP.

I wouldn't encourage someone to partake in something like a marathon if they were not sufficiently trained for it. However, there are some on this forum who always do. What are their motives? 

It seems that under the guise of lending support, they really want to see someone get hurt.

Who am I?

http://s3.runnersworld.co.uk/members/images/493151/gallery/southgold.png?width=350

 Thats me in green with a gold medal from last years Southern Road Relays.

Two seconds faster than the guy on my left who has run every single London Marathon in under 3 hours.

30/07/2013 at 19:36

It really depends on your motives. Most people's motives are London. But that's a different kind of marathon. All the big city marathons are different to the small 500-600 entry races where you run 26.2miles practically alone. 

So the overriding factor on whether you should enter a marathon is determined by your motives. Entering and running a marathon are easy. Getting to the start line without an injury isn't.

Suffer and raise money is one motivation. And works for thousands. 

30/07/2013 at 19:39

Ric, I don't think most people on this thread are encouraging the OP to do the Dublin marathon in 13 weeks. Because it's a silly idea.

cj dold: Don't do it. It's a silly idea. 

30/07/2013 at 20:22

Maybe your post didn't come across very well then Ric but it sounded pretty flippant to me. 

The OP sounds like one of the more sensible posters we've had on here recently to be honest  - he (or she) knows full well they aren't ready yet.

And I'm still not sure why you need to question anybody's motives as to why they want to run a marathon. Even if it is something to tick off a list what harm does it do to anyone else?  

30/07/2013 at 21:02

That's not green, that's blue. 

30/07/2013 at 21:04

let's compromise and call it teal.

31/07/2013 at 06:44
Screamapillar wrote (see)

Maybe your post didn't come across very well then Ric but it sounded pretty flippant to me. 

The OP sounds like one of the more sensible posters we've had on here recently to be honest  - he (or she) knows full well they aren't ready yet.

And I'm still not sure why you need to question anybody's motives as to why they want to run a marathon. Even if it is something to tick off a list what harm does it do to anyone else?  

Where did I question anybody's motives to run a marathon?

 

 

 

Edited: 31/07/2013 at 06:46
01/08/2013 at 01:19

Yep, it's a silly idea, thanks for talking me out of it.

I tried entering 6 weeks into the calculator thing and it still gave me a plan. 10 miles max, then a couple of short runs and race. Possibly it ought to give link to a supplier of walking aids and a good psychiatrist.

Stop press! I just tried it with 3 weeks. Too silly for words.

Anyways, motive ? London ? I had quite enough of London as a motorcycle courier, although time as a cycle courier was fun (try it for a one week fitness plan).  Dublin features on my horizon because it's  fairly easy trip from here and I'm pretty sure of a place to kip.

Ah well, back to training, if I can stop slacking off and doing stuff like this:

http://www.walkjogrun.net/routes/current_route.cfm?rid=92C97F1B-07B5-28C2-5E574B5E149BFFE3

 

01/08/2013 at 08:35

You've dis-qualified yourself from potential 'idiot with a bucket list' to 'sensible fellow, paragon of common sense'.

 

01/08/2013 at 09:33
RicF wrote (see)
Screamapillar wrote (see)

Maybe your post didn't come across very well then Ric but it sounded pretty flippant to me. 

The OP sounds like one of the more sensible posters we've had on here recently to be honest  - he (or she) knows full well they aren't ready yet.

And I'm still not sure why you need to question anybody's motives as to why they want to run a marathon. Even if it is something to tick off a list what harm does it do to anyone else?  

Where did I question anybody's motives to run a marathon?

 

 

 

Simply by saying "now it's just another item on an idiot's bucket list". It suggests you need to have a "proper" or worthy" motive (although what that I don't pretend to know) or it somehow doesn't count.

It might just have been a brain fart on your part but you needn't have said anything at all. Especially if you didn't want to be misinterpreted.

01/08/2013 at 10:56

So, about the 10% guideline and 20 miles.

In my early runs, I ran to time rather than distance becaue I only had a cheap Timex and added five minutes a fortnight. Extend one week, repeat the next and then extend again until I felt like having an easy week with a shorter run. Later I added ten minutes when I got over 1:40. The second run at the same distance generally felt easier, better at the finish, slightly shorter time over the same route.

If people generally train to 20 miles, why not 22 and 24 ? Is there an actual reason or is it just custom ? a 30 percent increase on the day seems a heck of a stretch. Is it just becaue it's a bit too much trouble to set aside the time for practice at the full distance ?

People seem to agree that 'the wall' is at the 20 mile mark, which would appear to be the common training distance. Given that it represents point at which glycogen stores have been depleted and you rely on lipid metabolism, would it not make sense to train for longer distances ?

01/08/2013 at 12:07

Nothing wrong with the bucket-list marathon. It's what got me into running seven years ago.  That's different from doing one under-prepared though.

iwabl - I'd take some of those mileage "rules" with a pinch of salt.  20 miles is not a magical figure, but quite a nice psychological barrier cos it starts with a 2 and not a 1.  Your longest run in the build up to a marathon should (IMO) be related to your fitness level.  Charlie Spedding regularly knocked out over-marathon distance training runs; I'll do 6-8 runs between 20 - 24 miles; a newbie might best be advised to run at least 3 runs over 20 miles.  Same with "the wall" - which is really a concept to scare people into training properly.   There's no obvious connection between what happens on your longest training run and the marathon race in terms of glycogen depletion because (a) you run your training runs at slower than race pace, so you shouldn't be getting anywhere near the wall anyway, and (b) you start the race after a taper period and carb load, so should be in a more glycogen-fuelled state anyway.  Also (c) on race day, you should be prepared to eek out every last drop of effort.  If you're not gurning for England in the last mile you're not trying hard enough.  Who cares if you've got no energy left and your legs don't work for another week?  You certainly don't want to go that far in training!

01/08/2013 at 22:22

Speaking as someone who did go the full distance in training for their first - suffice to say I never did it again! 20-23 miles tops, now.

If you do fancy doing one I second the Hal Higdon recommendation for a safe starter schedule. It *is* possible to run a marathon on less but the likelihood of spending the last hour or more of it in a very bad mood indeed does go up rather, and again, yes I do speak from experience

 

 


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